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Dahitman44

Ice fishing depth?

11 posts in this topic

Ok --I consider myself a pretty good fisherman, especially when it come to finding those trophy 10-inch eyes. wink.gifgrin.gif

But this question has always been on my mind. See if you guys have any thoughts.

Everyone knows that the best place to start ice fishing is where you caught the eyes late in the fall. Very good place to start.

Here is the question -- Why do we catch them in 35 feet of water before freeze up and then in 15 feet when there is ice on the lake?

I do not understand that -- anyone have any thoughts?

thanks

Hitman

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How long is it actually before the last open water trip and the first ice fishing trip usually??? I think the walleyes are offered a different presentation through the ice and were at that depth before but were not responding to it. Man I don't know just a guess. Or settle back into a more shallow feeding pattern after being left alone for a few weeks. ???????????

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hitman,

I think a lot of people overlook the fact what the lake was going through right before freeze-up. Around here it seems it is always extremely windy right before freeze-up, often the result of a big front coming through. Having sediment kicked up from the wind will temporarily alter fish feeding habit, often because the forage base gets affected or migrated. This could be why the fish may not be in the late fall spots when fishing them at early ice.

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Both are good points, guys, but it is winday all fall and they stay DEEP -- I just don;t quite understand. Maybe it is more simple --

With the water covered there is no wind to push the bait fish around? Maybe it is the deadish weed line?

I just don;t know.

Anyone else have that answer or a thought?

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Eyehunter --

How about you? I can't believe you fish as shallow as you do.

Why?

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Hit man i totally stay deep with new ice and i do just as good if not better than most peopl ei know. I work large sand flats that heave basically no structure. Fishing is not usually fast and furious but i can usually catch eyes all day long and they average to be nicer fish than my friends catch shallower. I hope that helps, plus i am usually always by my self. Nooner

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hitman, I can't say that I do much walleye fishing, but one thing I notice, is that I do fish deep breaks during early ice (December), and usually catch a some big fish (25" +). Usually by the time January rolls around, the crappies pick up, and by mid-January, trout season is open again.

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I guess I fish as shallow as I do, because that's where they are, which leads us back to your orignal question. Actually, where I set up it's usually about 15' on the deep end of the house and 13' on the shallow end, so I'm right at that same depth that you mentioned.

I guess I really don't know the answer to your original question. smirk.gif

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Eyehunter --

You have a wealth of knowledge up there somewhere, maybe you need a cool one or three to access the information?

wink.gifgrin.gifgrin.gifcool.gif

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Quote:

Eyehunter --

You have a wealth of knowledge up there somewhere, maybe you need a cool one or three to access the information?

wink.gifgrin.gifgrin.gifcool.gif


I don't know about a "wealth" but a couple of frosties sure couldn't hurt I guess...

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You also have to take into consideration the depth of the lake. If you fish a lake with a max of 25 ft and catch fish in 15 fow, you are fishing relatively deep for that body of water. If you're near 80 fow and fishing in 35 fow, your relative depth is much less in comparison. I also think bottom structure has a lot to do with it. Certain critters baitfish feed on come out at certain water temps and light penetration as well. Why is it I can never catch crappies at night in the summer, but can in the winter confused.gif Them fish are such a pain in the arse, but their fun to catch. I never stray far from structure (weedline, rocks, transition areas) during early ice when chasing walleyes.

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