Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Scott M

Where shall I practice in the Metro

6 posts in this topic

By Jean Hopfensperger

Star Tribune

Lewis Anderson looked out the window of his Roseville home this spring and spotted a couple of teenage boys shooting arrows into a bale of hay next door. Anderson's blood pressure soared: His wife and young son had just been playing nearby.

The boys weren't using "some toy archery kit," he said, but fast, compound bows. Anderson walked over and asked them to stop, explaining that shooting bows and arrows was illegal in back yards. But after checking city ordinances, he was shocked to learn it still was allowed.

Not anymore. Roseville recently became one of a growing number of suburbs to ban bows and arrows from back yards, offering a few exceptions for their use. A similar ordinance in Bloomington went into effect last week.

A classic childhood sport is being limited increasingly to school programs and archery ranges as suburbs become more densely populated and bows become more powerful.

"I think that with typical suburban lots, you don't have the length required for safety," said Lewis, whose complaint to Roseville City Hall sparked its ban. "As first-ring suburbs get more populated, they need to adopt the same rules as St. Paul and Minneapolis."

A typical bow and arrow used by hunters can travel 250 feet per second, according to a report prepared by Roseville city officials. Bows and arrows used by beginners are far less swift, but also can be less accurate. And a clear stretch of 60 to 90 feet is needed for safe target practice -- with no trees or other back-yard obstacles blocking the shoot.

'Public safety concerns evolve'

The bans also apply to parks and undeveloped, natural areas of cities. Sandra Johnson, associate city attorney in Bloomington, says that before the ban, residents could legally shoot bows and arrows in some areas near the Mississippi River flats that now are being used by joggers and walkers.

"Your public safety concerns evolve with your community," Johnson said.

Before adopting its ordinance, Roseville checked the law in several other suburbs. It found that Falcon Heights, Golden Valley, St. Louis Park, Burnsville and Richfield had banned bows and arrows, with a few exceptions.

Likewise other cities around the country have begun to limit the sport. Last month, Eau Claire, Wis., banned the use of bows and arrows in its own Archery Park. Last year, the Cincinnati suburb of Fort Mitchell also banned archery in back yards after a family pet was shot. The bans aren't exactly engulfing the nation, archery advocates say, but they are slowly surfacing in the halls of government.

Typically under the suburban bans in Minnesota, back-yard archery is prohibited, but schools and authorized archery ranges are allowed.

In some suburbs such as Minnetonka, the police chief was authorized to grant individuals permission to shoot from their yards, but typically after residents applied for a time-specified permit.

Although the bow and arrow falls under the category of "dangerous weapons" in most city ordinances, it has some quirks. It's against the law to "conceal" one, but as Johnson jokes, that would be pretty tough. Criminals are not robbing homes or committing deadly assaults with them. And in suburbs such as Roseville, police do not recall any arrests for unlawful possession, transportation or use of a bow and arrow.

"How many people get shot and killed in the United States by accident with a bow and arrow?" asked John Larsen, who runs the Bwana Archery range in Little Canada.

Larsen is among the suburban residents who urges city councils to "be realistic" when they change rules. He grew up shooting bow and arrows in his parents' back yard in Arden Hills. He still enjoys practicing with red and orange balloons as targets in a makeshift archery range that extends from his driveway to garage in Maplewood.

"Most people have been shooting in their back yards for 30, 40 years without a problem," he said. "I see things as just going overboard. We've had a business 30 years and never had to carry someone out on a stretcher."

Daniel Erickson, an officer for the Rapids Archery Club in Coon Rapids, says he understands both sides of the debate.

"I think it depends on the size of the city lots," Erickson said. "There are lots of places, such as Minneapolis, Brooklyn Center, or Fridley, where I can see [a ban] making sense there. Accidents happen. But if you live somewhere where most lots are an acre or more, I don't have a problem with it."

Roseville Mayor Craig Klausing also grappled with how far to go with the ban, acknowledging that bows and arrows haven't been a burning issue in the city. The original language of Roseville's ordinance out and out banned them, he said.

The City Council ultimately passed an ordinance last month that gives the police chief the authority to grant permits to individuals with particularly large lots or other special circumstances that would make archery safe.

A few weeks after that vote, a bow hunter contacted City Hall, asking if the city could create a site for hunters to shoot. Klausing said the city is now looking into the request.

Anderson continues to argue for a complete ban. He wonders whether neighbors will be consulted when the police chief considers issuing a permit, and whether police will actually enforce the new ordinance.

"I understand that there are [skilled] archers out there," he said. "But I still think the possibility of an arrow going off target is high."

************************************

What a bummer. Granted most people don't even have yards big enough to practice in, but for those that do, what does it matter and who does it harm? No precedent of any human accidents yet they take away someone's rights to shoot a bow in their own back yard.

I guess you can't do what you want on your own piece of dirt anymore. I can't wait to move out of the cities..... frown.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will keep shooting in my back yard, my 8 year old and 5 year old shoot all the time, I also let a few fly from my longbow. As long as the neighbor smoke outside I have a better chance of getting second hand smoke complications than I do of getting stuck by one of them. wink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's always the 17yd hallway shot to fall back on... just make sure the center of your target hasn't been shot out! Did I mention I'm great at patching drywallcool.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

There's always the 17yd hallway shot to fall back on...


I have my past-the-water-heater, over-the-washer-and-dryer, and into-the-bale-of-cardboard-while-the-wife's-at-work shot. It's about 15 yards, but it's tricky. And the down-the-stairs-and-into-the-foam-block shot. Helps with treestand shooting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

anyone else find themselves asking why this reporter failed to mention that it doesnt matter that it was legal in roseville because Ramsey County already banned the discharge of a bow at any place that was not a designated range? Either way, i will continue to shoot in my backyard in st. paul, the neighbors dont care, so why should it concern anyone else?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kind of sad that this happened. One bad apple will ruin it for the rest

***********************

Lino Lakes family wants charges filed in dog's death

by Mitch Anderson, Star Tribune

A Lino Lakes family is looking for authorities to press charges after someone shot and killed their family dog with a bow and arrow.

Around 9 p.m. March 21, Rhonda Neuberger let her dog Wally, a 3-year-old beagle mix, out to run around the yard. While finishing laundry inside the house, Neuberger heard a yelp from outside.

"What we saw when we all went out was Wally trying to walk toward our back steps and the arrow was sticking right through him," she said Friday.

Neuberger's husband, Edwin, removed the arrow, which punctured his lungs and broke several ribs, and applied pressure to the wound while the police were called.

In an attempt to save Wally's life, the family swaddled the dog in blankets and rushed him to a veterinarian -- but it was too late.

"We pulled up and he died as we opened the door," Rhonda Neuberger said.

"We've got a lot of family that cried along with us that night," she said. "You know, Wally was family."

A path of blood and dog prints led police to a house across the street, the police report stated, where officers eventually arrested a 21-year-old man. He was released three days later.

Any charges are pending the conclusion of a police investigation, Assistant Anoka County Attorney Bryan Lindberg said Friday.

According to the police report, when questioned about his whereabouts, the man first told police he had been sleeping in the house and hadn't shot anything, but later said he was hunting fox out of his back window.

When officers told him it was a dog that had been shot, the report stated, the man immediately replied, "Was it [the] Neubergers' dog?"

Police retrieved a hunting bow from the downstairs bedroom of the house and took the man into custody.

An unidentified man who answered the phone at the residence Friday declined to comment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • eyeguy 54
      pretty neat that the train went over. 
    • Muskies
      Was out opening weekend walleye fishing. Caught walleyes in 10 -12 ft slow trolling minnows. Looked like the spawn was over and this coming weekend should be much better. Water was 55 degrees in the area I was in and didn't  get any other species.
    • Muskies
      Good evening hooked up as a non resident you are allowed one walleye between the sizes mentioned per day no matter what license you posses. As others have stated, the smallness should be off their beds and the walleyes will be transitioning to the deep water reefs. Wind blown points or current are always good places to start.
    • Wheres_Walter
      I'm not a big bass chaser, but last year I started tossing senkos rigged wacky around rock piles and docks and did pretty well on Smallies.  Green Pumpkin color seemed to work the best.    Stay away from white bouys, they mark hazards..... Unless you are creeping up on them with your trolling motor to pitch senkos on top of the rock pile.  I'll be on Trout Lake June 7-10 so if you want to text me when you get up to Vermilion I can give you a report on how it went for us.   Lots of resorts on Vermilion rent 25 HP fishing boats.     matt 612-868-1282
    • JBMasterAngler
      Boat traffic isn't all that bad, there's a million places to escape it on that lake anyway. Bugs are usually pretty bad that time of year, and we've had a pretty wet spring so far also. But they're not an issue out on the water. You can launch at a different access each day, and it'll be like being on a completely different lake.
    • JeremyCampbell
      Thats a great view
    • Wanderer
      This time of year inside weedlines with sand have been good historically.  Find some cabbage and you should be golden.   Those walleyes could show up here and there on cranks in that 10 foot range too.
    • Cliff Wagenbach
      I do not fish bass very often but have had good luck using straight braided line for bass and walleye. Very few bugs out on the water! Shore bugs usually only out in the late evenings. Very few jet skis and water skiers on most of Vermilion most of the time. Weekend Holidays can see a lot of traffic. Some one else will surely answer your bass bait questions ! Tons of rusty crayfish in the East end that the bass love! Cliff
    • Mr. Basskisser
      Hey guys. My wife and I are coming up June 10th for a week of bass and pike fishing. Staying in Niles Bay area. Had a few more questions, hoping for some insight from some locals/regulars.  I was wondering ab ou how bad the bugs usually are in mid June, mosquitos,  biting flies and no see ums. Hoping when are are out in the boat fishing they will pretty much leave us alone.         I mentioned going to Vermilion on a thread on our local Ohio fishing forum. A few guys commented that it was a very busy lake with lots of jet ski and tubers. I was thinking if I wanted a more remote feel for a day maybe renting a boat and taking the portage to Trout Lake. I know our 40 hp is too big. I was also thinking of trying the river below the dam launching on 8 mile creek. Saw that on an episode of Ultimate Fishing Adventures. I was wondering if that area is limited to 25 hp motors. What would be the pros and cons of each spot?     I know V is tannic stained. We use pretty much braid on all our poles. Do you braid users feel you need a flouro leader when  bass fishing. Here in Ohio our water is rarely clear enough to worry about that.   One last thing what are the go to colors for tubes and senkos for bass?        Thanks for any help info you can give.                    Mr. Basskisser      
    • eyeguy 54
      Cathedral     brown with black specks senko style has been really good.