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SCUMFROG

New bow help.

15 posts in this topic

I'm looking to get into bow hunting. I'd like some input on what you guys shoot and why. Also what should I look for in a new bow? I'm new to this.

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Scum- be ready for quite a few answers.. its just like asking which is better.. Ford/Chevy... Lund/Cresliner ... Ranger/Skeeter.. ect...

I myself shoot a 05' Hoyt Ultratec IT fits me, feels good in my hand. I love the draw cycle.. its fairly light, holds stedy for me, and is pretty fast.

There are a ton of companies out there that make a good quality bow. I think its most important how well the bow fits you than how much it costs, yet I also feel you do get what you pay for at times as well...

I suggest going to a good bow shop and have them explain how the bows are different. Shoot them and then write down what you did and didn't like about the bows.

Best of luck!... its a grand spot to be a part of. Be carefull you may never shoot a deer rifle again like me.

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Yep, you'll get a mess of different answers like DD said. I totally agree with him about how to proceed. Personally, I've never been a Mathews guy- they just don't feel very good to me. However, there are a ton of people who love 'em. Same can be said for Bowtech, Hoyt, PSE, etc. When you check them out, the things I like to pay particular attention to are the draw cycle, how the grip feels to me, noise, and hand shock. I like a fairly fast bow, but I don't worry a whole bunch about it- fps or what the thing IBO'd at isn't too big a deal for me. Oh, one other thing I really like and recommend to anyone is a fairly long bow (axle to axle). The longer the bow you shoot, the more forgiving it will be (all other things being equal). The drawback to longer bows is the added weight and less ability to get in and out of tight spaces (both pretty unimportant to me and I think usually blown totally out of proportion).

Anyway... just a few things to chew on. Follow DD's advice and you'll be off and running.

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Ditto what's been said. Go to a pro shop or even somewhere like Scheel's with a dedicated archery department and manager (I love that place). Anywhoo, shoot a lot of bows and ask lots of questions. I too, am afflicted with the illnes that has overtaken Deitz. In fact, I commented to my wife the other day on the number of times I could have takend deer if I was using a rifle or shotgun versus my bow this season. At first she thought I was nuts for making it tougher on myself like that but now she understands the enjoyment that comes with it. The sense of accomplishment. I could go buy some hamburger if I wanted meat or get some sheds much easier if I wanted a big rack. But the challenge and thrill of outwitting a deer (and getting outwitted far more times) is what keeps me coming back. Good luck !

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Don't get caught up with feet per second, accuracy is far more important.

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And don't worry about getting a 70 pound bow, most people are better off with the 50-60 pound and saving their shoulders.

As of this year the DNR allows deer killing at 30 pounds and up.

Let us know when the addiction starts! grin.gif

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Deitz is spot on, go to a pro shop and talk to the dudes. They will not steer you wrong.

For what it's worth, I shoot a PSE Express. Why? Cuz i got it about 20 years or so ago and I like it. Don't get caught up in hype about the latest and greatest.

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Quote:

And don't worry about getting a 70 pound bow, most people are better off with the 50-60 pound and saving their shoulders.


Good point. With the lighter pull weight, you'll practice more and when it gets cold and you've been on a stand for an hour or more, you'll find that you might not be able to pull back that heavier weight. (Found that out with experience.)

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Thanks for all the info.

I did look at those mission bows. Any one heard of these/used one before?

And also what about a used bow? I looked at a mathews switchback that was all set up. The only thing I needed to add was a release and arrows. It was in my price range.

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If you go used you will save money, but make sure it's the one you want. If you are unsure of what type set up you like it's really in you best interest to visit a pro shop, look around, and talk to the guys there.

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Buying a used bow is a great way to get into the sport without dropping the large chunk of ching that new bows cost. Even a new mission is half the price of the big boys and once you've bought all the candy for it, get a release and arrows you are gonna be around $1000 anyways.

I bought my first bow used from Cabin Fever where they let guys sell there stuff on consignment. Now its been 3 years and I've changed the rest, sight and the strings. Not too bad.

Now that I know I'm serious about sticking with bowhunting (I love that pun), my wife has said I can get whatever new bow I want this year. Woo-hoo!!!!

The biggest ting is find out what you like. Shoot as many as you can. If one place only carries 2 brands, than find another shop where you can shoot the rest. Once you know what you like then you can start watching prices and finding something in your price range that you like to shoot.

I have a 8yr old Darton. I had never heard of them cause they don't spend $$$$ advertising in the big magazines, but they are a top level bow maker with good stuff. I've used that bow for 3 years and I plan on getting rid of it after this season and I will still get $150-250 for it depending on what goodies I leave on it.

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you know I knew I asked this before.. grin.gif

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That's great that your taking your time. I'm definately too much of an impulse buyer and can be one-track-minded.

Just might have been a good idea to add to your old post so stuff dosen't get duplicated.

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Thanks for finding it for me. I forgot I even posted that.

I think I'll go with the mission bow from mathews. It's the best bow for the price. And it'll be ready to go when I pick it up. grin.gif

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