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Dragonsm

1996 Chev Corsica question

7 posts in this topic

My commuter car is a 1996 Chev Corsica with the 2.2 motor with about 152,000 miles on it. In the past 6 months or so, I have noticed it has been harder to start at times. Seems as though when it is damp outside or after driving it for a while when it is warmed up it'll crank and crank and crank and maybe stutter and start, however I normally have to put the pedal to the floor and then it will start (smells "rich" then) and after it seems to burn the excess runs fine. I am guessing something similar to this was discussed in another post where putting the pedal to the floor "defloods" it and that it more than likely is a plug, wire or coil issue due to lack of spark?

Spark plugs were recently changed and gapped accordingly. Haven't touched plug wires or ignition coils just yet. Does this sound like I am heading down the right road? If you need more "information" for a guess, let me know and I'll try and provide.

Thanks in advance!

Steve

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Take a look in your plug wire caps to see if they're clean.

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Fuel pressure regulator. This is the most known issue for an extended crank especially with a warm vehicle that sits for 15 - 20 minutes and then has an extended crank. You should see the regulator on fuel rail. There will be a rubber vacuum hose attatched to it. Remove the hose cycle the key on and off a couple of times. If you see any fuel you have found the problem.

Another thing to try is just cycle the key a couple of time (on two seconds-off-on two seconds-off) then crank it over. If you notice a significant decrease in crank over time then try the above.

Have you noticed you fuel economy decreasing?

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Quote:

Fuel pressure regulator.


I concur! If you remove the vacuum line and find ANY fuel in the vacuum port (or hose) at the regulator, it definitely needs replacing. Its an easy one (two wrenches and a torx bit if I recall) and the regulator is in the 50ish range if I recall.

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Alright....well, I finally got around to digging around in the engine and after looking in my Chilton's manual, I noticed that it wasn't a larger rubber hose that I was looking for, but a rather small hose coming out the top? Anyway, I believe I found it right on the fuel rail (right side of motor when you are looking at it) and there was a rubber boot with a 90 degree bend into a small hose coming out the top. Anyway, I removed that and there was fuel that came pouring out.

Just want to check that I removed the right hose before I go pick the part up and that it sounds like the part is shot. (local checker store wants close to 100 for the part)

Thanks

Steve

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Sounds like you found the culprit. Yes it is a small vacuum hose on the top and a metal line on the bottom.

If you decide to replace it yourself I would suggest picking up a tube of syl glide to lubricate the rubber o-ring before installation. You'll find bunch of uses for this stuff once you have it.

Should look just like this

regulatorfh5.jpg

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Thanks for all the replies! I picked the part up last night (ended up finding one for $80)and it took me a little longer than a normal mechanic to get it uninstalled and the new one installed, but none the less it is in there and it was the culprit! Maybe it was just the "feel good" of installing the part myself, but I swear the motor is idling smoother, quieter, accelerates and decelerates better and I am guessing gas mileage is up too.

None the less....thanks!

Steve

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