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chucker34

Forget the Coyotes, Look Out For the Neighbor Dog

34 posts in this topic

Well, I ended my season yesterday morning with a yearling doe. It was pretty exhilarating since I took her from the ground while walking to my ground blind. I saw her before she saw me and it gave me enough time to duck behind a very large maple tree and draw. She kept coming toward me and when she paused 20 yards to the left of the tree, I sent a 100 gram muzzy right through the heart. She ran about 30 yards into a slough and collapsed. I didn't know it was a heart shot at the time and after losing the last one, I backed out and gave it a couple of hours.

It felt pretty good after a near miss and a shoulder blade hit with no deer to be found in the weeks leading up to this past one. It would have felt even better had I not come back to the doe and found our neighbor's dog chowing away on her. Luckily, he had only clipped the end of some ribs and chewed a little on the edge of one of the back haunches. He was primarily focusing his efforts on the innards, which saved it from being more of a loss. Had I got there another few minutes later and who knows.

Hard to be mad at the dog. He's a dog, that's what dogs do. What I can't understand, is why people don't keep their dogs in their own yards, even in the country, especially during deer season. That lack of respect for others is what makes me mad. BTW, I would talk to the neighbor directly but he's going through some terminal health problems and I just consider myself fortunate to be hunting and that I'm healthy in the first place. Would be a different story had not that wildcard be thrown in.

Regardless, a lesson learned. Get to that deer early if you suspect a good shot because who knows what will get a hold of it, no matter where you hunt. And all in all a good season. Venison will be in the freezer and I get to stay inside now while its butt cold. Until ice fishing of course. grin.gif Good luck everyone who is still out there!

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What I can't understand, is why people don't keep their dogs in their own yards, even in the country, especially during deer season.


I just have a discussion like this with my 2 new neighbors last year. This chaps my .... a lot

I live in the country, my neighbors always lived in the country, the 2 new ones are "city folks". My dogs don't have a "fence" where to stay, they roam their "territory" which includes my yard and surrounding properties which are mainly fields. It took a few months to get acquainted with the new people and their dogs, in the meanwhile the 2 new neighbors were complaining, causing a discussion which spoiled the friendship.

Don't blame the dog for something he does naturally, I could turn things around and say you shouldn't have left a dead deer for 2 hours in the woods, which I argue the legality of this. People has to understand that when they venture in somebody else's backyard they have to adjust to the environment, not the other way around.

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Are you trying to say its illegal to leave a deer you shot on your own property for two hours to make sure its down and dead so you don't lose it? I'm kind of confused. And again, I lost a deer a few weeks ago because I pursued it too quickly.

Also, to your other point, believe me when I say I've never been a "city folk." But I also believe in respecting other people's private property, whether it be man or beast that is trespassing.

I've had neighbor dogs literally screw up my hunts by running deer past me and now chowing down on one of my deer. I've taken it in good stride to get along with my neighbors and have tactfully mentioned such instances to them. In many cases, they've responded by keeping closer eyes on their dogs, espcecially in the Fall.

I don't expect my neighbors to change the way they live their lives on their own property, but I do expect them to respect my wishes on my own property.

That may make me a jerk or not as much of a "country folk" to others, but I think most hunters would agree they wouldn't want a trespassing human trapsing around their property during hunting season so why would they want a canine trespasser.

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So now we are labeling "city folks" and "country folks". Sounds like descrimination to me. What the heck difference does it make? Here is my take on the situation. Everybody keep your dog on your property! I consider it trespassing by the neighbor for not controlling their dog. I have always been a so called "city folk" living on a city lot and it is just universal to keep your dog in your yard. My inlaws are "country folk" as labeled in above post. My dog spends time over there, only 5 acres, he stays put. Their dog also stays put. If they are out of your yard, correct them until they understand the boundaries of the yard.

I can definitely understand not wanting neighbors dogs in my yard. What a liablity for the neighbor to let dog roam, what if it harms a child or one of the neighbors animals. I as a "city folk" hope to someday move to a so called sacred "country folk" neighborhood. My dog will stay in my yard and my neighbors better also. This is one of the things that really gets me riled up, control your dog and keep it in your yard.

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valve, I've seen many of your posts here, and this one is ridiculous. I too live in the country, and have learned over the years that dogs that roam end up dead, usually from being accused of chasing deer.

I commend a bowhunter who will allow time for the animal to expire instead of risking bumping a wounded deer.

Leaving it in the field not following up on it is legal. So is shooting the neighbor dog who is eating your fresh kill. I am very surprised at your post.

Keep your dogs on your property, that is the only territory they should be allowed to roam! This post really chaps me! And I am a dog lover and hunting dog owner!

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Valv,

I think you are way off here. For one, you can leave a deer LEGALLY as long as you want. As long as you tag it, register it and use it (no wanton waste). You obviously have never hunted big game if you think 2 hours is a long time. 12 hours is pretty typical for bow hunting.

As for your dogs... come on. Have some respect for hunters. You complain when people are disrespectful when you are fishing but since you don't hunt you don't have to be respectful? Keep you dogs inside or leashed or whatever it takes to keep them on your own land during hunting season. Lot of people aren't so nice and won't think twice about plugging a dog... especially if it is chasing deer and there is nothing illegal about that during certain dates of the year.

See page 28 of the 2007 MN DNR Hunting Regs.

Also, you better keep you dogs away during hunting season as the DNR does not mess around with the Hunter Harrassment laws and you can be fined and issued a citation if you dogs interupt a hunt.

You may not be disturbing hunters but if your dogs are roaming on to other people's property and they have an issue with that then you are responsible and need to respect other people a bit more than you do a couple of dogs.

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I'm sure this will get dog/animal lovers all riled up, but a bee bee in the butt of a stray dog will teach them real quick. And before people freak out, I wouldn't shoot a dog for fun, but our neighbors literally let their dog go and he won't go home for days- get him the he(double hockey sticks) out of my yard!

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Letting a dog roam is bad for many reason.

1 Tick off the nieghbors who more than likely don't want "your"dog around.

2 "Your" dogs territory is your property and that is it.

3 "Your" dog is going to be harrassing animals all year long,nesting and mating seasons, birds and mammals.

4 Keep your pets near the house and in your yard if you want to be a responsible pet owner. Yes your pet will get into trouble,(trap,poison,car hit,shoot, rabid animal).

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A lot of places, such as the township I live in, have leash laws which require that you keep your dog on a leash. The number of residents that actually abide by this is slim to none. Lot's of vicious dogs where I live too - they are all pit bulls, rottweilers, german shepherds, dobermans, etc. and they are all mean as all get out. You can't even go for a walk/run around here without fear of being mauled. (I've been bitten myself in the past)

You've got every right to shoot and kill every one of those dogs that threatens you or attacks you and is not leashed in the owner's yard. And if any one of those beasts came onto your property, you have every right to kill it there too. This is taught in gun safety classes, was told by a CO himself, along with shooting dogs that are running deer.

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Valv,

I grew up in about as much of a "country" place possible, and I can tell you that if your or my dog is regularly seen out wandering around the country side, you might as well not get too attached to him because he won't be coming home eventually.

You can't be serious with your post. You call what you do "country"?? I call it lazy and disrespectful.

I love the way you try to spin it to convince yourself that you're the victim because people didn't appreciate your dog running all over the countryside. Good humor, and its only Tuesday!!!! lol....

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Whoaaa gentlemen. I think we all misunderstood what I meant, no need to get hotheaded like BigTen.

Let's get back to our business and don't transform this in something that will get locked/erased etc due to personal attacks.

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This is a tough one!

I live out in country and have a kennel for my dogs. I do like to let them run around yard every now and then. They mostly stay right by garage or front porch area. Once I got a call from a neighbor who had one of my dogs (a little minni black lab, palmeranion/fox terrier/ Pekinese mix, that was all black and looked like a minnylab). I went over to get dog, only to have the guy yelling at me. Here, my real life sized black lab had gotten away from him, but before killing and eating a little girl’s bunny rabbit right in front of her eyes. I under stood why he was mad and offered to buy another bunny for the girl, but he refused. I never have talked with this neighbor since and I keep a very close eye on my dogs since then. This was 3 years ago.

This time of the year, I would never let dogs run on there own. I have to much invested into them and would die to loose one. Also I have respect for other fellow hunters.

I would never shoot a dog in a deer stand though.

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Quote:

Quote:

What I can't understand, is why people don't keep their dogs in their own yards, even in the country, especially during deer season.


I just have a discussion like this with my 2 new neighbors last year. This chaps my .... a lot

I live in the country, my neighbors always lived in the country, the 2 new ones are "city folks". My dogs don't have a "fence" where to stay, they roam their "territory" which includes my yard and surrounding properties which are mainly fields. It took a few months to get acquainted with the new people and their dogs, in the meanwhile the 2 new neighbors were complaining, causing a discussion which spoiled the friendship.

Don't blame the dog for something he does naturally, I could turn things around and say you shouldn't have left a dead deer for 2 hours in the woods, which I argue the legality of this. People has to understand that when they venture in somebody else's backyard they have to adjust to the environment, not the other way around.


Could you please elaborate on what you meant that we are misinterpreting?

Thanks.

I've heard a lot of people tell me that this subject "chaps their a#%, but I've never ever heard anyone say it ticks them off because of your reasons. It's always the other way.

If you feel that I am personally attacking you, that is not my intent, but I don't see how you could not think its at least somewhat lazy and disrespectful to your neighbors to let your dog run free while everyone else tries to keep their dog home.

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Ya, big ten!

That kind of a post is not cool!

I do not know how much land Valve has, but the farmers and land owners around here let there dogs run free as well. They are good dogs and you get to know them after time. Some of these people have 300-1000 acres and dogs are never chained or kenneled up. Its how it has been for years. Drive up driveway and dog gets up and comes to your car.

Its country living, not lazy. When I grew up, our malamute used to run free for ever and lived a very long life. We picked her up 15 miles away from home once, found her trotting her way back south on 169, when we where going north. The down side was she would bring home road kill for us to see. It was kind of her present to us.

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Quote:

My dogs don't have a "fence" where to stay, they roam their "territory" which includes my yard and surrounding properties which are mainly fields.


I couldn't disagree more. Nothing urps me more than witnessing deer being chased by dogs while out hunting. Early season bowhunting started as a goldmine with the best numbers of deer I've seen in years but we've had 2 separate incidents with dogs in the past few weeks and the woods has been dry ever since. I don't have the heart to shoot a dog but I know of many that would...

Please keep your dogs from running wild... for their own safety.

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Valv -

(Contact Us Please)? My 80 year old dad came out to purchase some items from you, and your white dog bit him twice. You apologized, but you should have seen the bruising on him, and luckily the skin was broken as a scratch, not a puncture.

From first-hand experience with you and your dogs based on my dads experience, I say you're w a y out of line on this one. Condoning free range dogs is asking for trouble - if I were to find a dog eating a deer I'd killed, I would not - absolutely would not - hesitate to shoot the dog.

Your dog bites my dad and you say it's his fault for not accomodating? Whatever happened to civility? You're very lucky he didn't pursue legal action against you - he's a nice guy but sure was mad about that incident.

PS - Moderators, would you at least let Valv reply before you boot me and lock this thread? I'd like to read his response before I'm out.

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Quote:

Ya, big ten!

That kind of a post is not cool!

I do not know how much land Valve has, but the farmers and land owners around here let there dogs run free as well. They are good dogs and you get to know them after time. Some of these people have 300-1000 acres and dogs are never chained or kenneled up. Its how it has been for years. Drive up driveway and dog gets up and comes to your car.

Its country living, not lazy. When I grew up, our malamute used to run free for ever and lived a very long life. We picked her up 15 miles away from home once, found her trotting her way back south on 169, when we where going north. The down side was she would bring home road kill for us to see. It was kind of her present to us.


Are you kidding me? I give up. You win.

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Guys, I think some people are mis-understanding what Valv meant. In all honesty, I'm a little confused myself.

None the less, things need to calm down and the personal attacks stop now or this will get locked, and the sharing of good info along with it.

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This comes from the MN DNR site.

RadioBite script: Dogs chasing deer

February 21, 2003

RadioBite Script

Dogs chasing deer

Track: As the snow begins to melt, the DNR reminds owners to not let their dogs chase deer and other wildlife which can become quite a problem at this time of year. DNR Conservation officer Steve Jacobson says a deer chased by dogs can die of stress and exhaustion. Dog owners face fines, or worse.

RadioBite #025

:24 Dogs chasing deer, Steve Jacobson, DNR Conservation Officer

"But the big thing is for every deer that they kill, they can be assessed a $500 civil penalty for each animal that that dog kills, so it can be a very expensive if their dog is seen chasing deer. As well as the fact the dog can be shot by police officers or conservation officers at anytime they observe a dog chasing deer."

Track: The DNR encourages anyone seeing wildlife harassment to contact their local conservation officer.

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Big Ten,

This is an old time way of thinking. Call me down home or a country boy, but nothing reminds me more of the country than a farm dog. Now is this right, I can not say it is now a days. With encroaching developments, the old time land owner or farmer does have to change. It sad when a neighbor sells off his land and the next store neighbor has to change things that have been that way for years, that’s how it is.

I do not condone letting dogs run free, because of liability aspect. But to knock a fellow F.Mer like that, for a belief he has (even if it does not go with what you want or think) is not good posting. Read forum policy.

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I have absolutely no problem letting your dog "run" as long as it stays around your place. If it will not, then you need to either take action, whether it be to neuter or spay them, put up some form of constraint system, or something. The "farm dogs" I know stay around the yard, otherwise the owner or neighbor takes care of the problem. That is all I'm saying.

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Big ten,

You are correct!

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I would agree that the personal attacks should not come into play here. Everyone's entitled to their opinion either way. Let's hear them all without any personal jabs.

I would also agree, I have no problem with your dog running free around your yard or your own property if you're with him and/or knows where he is at all times. Or at least make an attempt to know. You may not think he's hurting the neighbor by trapsing around his woods, but how do you know the neighbor isn't bowhunting or trapping for that matter. No one wants to see a dog get stuck in a trap but someone's belief that their dog can run the countryside shouldn't stop me from being able to trap on my own property.

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BigTen, you are correct, and what I meant is what Shackbash added.

My dog(s) (only 1 now, a border collie) don't run wild, at all.

I apologize if I seemed to (and I don't) condone any wildlife chasing, killing, or even harassing by dogs, I was just irked by the statement of "during deer season", like a dog knows about it.

The dog Heartman mentioned was a stray that was found and it was put down by Humane Society the next day, he knew about it and omitted it.

Chucker34, thank you for trying to come up to my rescue, I've been spending past hour thinking what to write to get out of this "hole"

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Valv, thanks for replying and clarifying. I meant that, expecially during deer season, a dog owner should be considerate of not screwing people up on their own property with free roaming dogs, or risk that dogs life should someone decide to take aim - which I don't agree with.

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