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slick2526

coyote hunting tips

14 posts in this topic

Hey guys, Well im new to hunting coyote. My friends were telling me they have been hearing alot of them and one of them shot one today deer hunting and they other guy told me he seen two running today while deer hunting. Well next week im geting a .243 and decided trying to shoot some coyotes would be fun.

I guess im looking for information as far as what type of call to use that would be easy for a newbie. and where to set up as far as wind and location. Theese areas have some trees along the sides of the fields. One field still has the corn standing and the other field is just tall grass.

Any info on how to set up as far as an area to sit in, calls, or decoys would be appreciated.

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can't really help with where to sit, but I would start by making sure if they are in the woods, you are not going through the woods to make your stands.

Wind: coyotes will usually circle down wind of you so make sure you use the wind crosswise or give yourself the least amount of downwind area possible (make sense?)

calls: dan thompson's red desert howler is nice, but it takes a little practice since it is an open reed call (kind of like a clarinet, you move your mouth on the reed to raise and lower the pitch of the call. The PC series of calls are closed reed so they are a little easier, just blow and the sound will come out. If you have ever heard a dying rabbit, it sounds awfully painful, remember that when you are calling.

With out seeing your fields and your areas to set up this is about all I can offer at this time. Get out there and good luck.

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I will be taking my .222 rem with me. Primos has a couple excellent videos worth buying. Head to the sportmans ware house or simular store to the coyote section and you will find everything you need.

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Slick, I also recommend a video. Crash course on everything you need to know to get started.

I hunted fox and coyote for several years in North Dakota, wearing the white camo and calling them in with a screaming rabbit call. I used a Scotch game call that you didn't blow into but that had a rubber flexible tube you squeezed and forced air through the call. I liked it really well and it worked great. Not to mention it never froze up like the mouth-blown calls can do on cold days. They still make them. I just bought another one a couple winters ago because now I'm calling them into the camera instead of the gun.

Most of my hunting in N.D. was for fox, because coyotes weren't as common in N.D. then as they are now, but I had coyotes come in now and then, too. Fox didn't circle downwind very often, but the coyotes almost always did.

Don't know the country you're hunting, but if it's open country, I'd make sure you're calling from a location with enough shelter to break your outline but with a lot of open land around, including downwind, so you have a fighting chance to see and get a shot at circling coyote.

A video will certainly deal with this, but most new predator callers make the mistake of calling too much. The hearing on coyotes and fox is so good that sometimes after I'd make my first series of screams and didn't hit the call anymore after that, I've seen them coming from nearly a mile away (really open country when I was on a ridge with a view), and they would have passed within 50 yards of my location.

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thanks for all the info guys. keep it comming

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What do you guys do with the 'Yotes once you shoot them? Just wondering. I know most people will keep the hide. I've been thinking about going for the past couple winters in western MN. They're everywhere.

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my uncles trap, so there are plenty of carcus to use as bait. skin em out keep the hide to be scrapped at the fur shed and sold. carcus either gets used as bait or goes to the rendering plant in preston, mn where it gets turned into makeup for women!

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There are a plenty in the area, a person needs to get out and the more you go the more you will learn.

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[

Quote:


. carcus either gets used as bait or goes to the rendering plant in preston, mn where it gets turned into makeup for women!


Now we've all heard the phrase coyote ugly, but come on, ya mean the women down there try to get the coyote uglies. grin.gif Couldn't resist, sorry.

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Slick, I just got in the mail a Knight and Hale Lead Dawg 2 in one coyote call. I haven't taken it for a real test yet but the neighborhood australian sheepdog sure liked the rabbit sounds I made. 2 in 1 because you can flip the reed over and go from a open reed howler to a closed reed distress call. The distress sounds more like a jackrabbit, but it sounds good. I got mine for subscribing to predator extreme magazine. Pretty good magazine and has gotten better over the couple years I have subscribed.

I am heading to Iowa this weekend and heading out Friday morning to make a couple sets with M1 Bandit (minaska outdoors) and this hand call. I like the ease of it compared to my red desert howler.

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Any time of the day better then other times?

I am going to start coyote hunting in the next week or so and would like any info on what time of the day is best.

Thanks!

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Early Am and last light are best. Set up so there isn't cover directly down wind of you or the dogs will come in and leave, you'll never know they were there. Canines noses are amazing, let the wind be your friend.

Any coyote that is more than one year old has been exposed to the traditional rabbit calls, instead get a electronic call with many sounds, this will help. Also the call can be placed away from you so you can get by with a little movement without getting busted.

Snow and cold will increase your stand to coyote ratio alot. In the bset conditions your doing good with 25%, if it's warm they don't need to eat as much.

If you get a double coming in shoot the last dog first, it will be the female, then make a wounded dog call on your howler or call. This will stop the first dog so you can get a shot.

Last but not least don't take a shot if the dog is moving! I don't care how good of rifleman you think you are, you are better off letting out a bark to stop them. They will look right at you but buy then your rifle will be ready for an easy shot. Enjoy the early season the dogs get smart in a hurry.

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YO Slick ha ha jk lol look at the yote season thread on here it's near the top here i posted some good info and so did a bunch of other people

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Peder, Thanks for the info... smile.gif

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