Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

  • Announcements

    • Rick

      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
Sign in to follow this  
CodyDawg

Gun Accuracy

Recommended Posts

CodyDawg    0
CodyDawg

So recently I went to the range to sight in my shotgun for the opener. Really, to just check to make sure I was "on". So I shoot 3 shots each at 50 yards and 100 yards and am happy with the results (just a tad over 2" at 100 and less at 50). Plenty good enough for me...pretty typical of my gun. I know it isn't rifle-like accuracy, but it will get the job done. So I am happy but know that I can't blame the gun for any miss grin.gif. Here is the point that got me though. The guys on either side of me are shooting a 270 bolt, a 30/06 auto and 2 more bolts of unknown caliber. They asked me about shotguns and said too bad I had to use that...like it was just junk. This kinda irked me a little, cuz I am happy with my results, but that is the thinking these days. So we go down to see the targets and the BEST of their groups was over 6" at 100 yds and the worst was all over the paper. These guys were saying, yep, these are pretty good. I just couldnt help but show them mine saying, shotguns arent just too bad guys. Man, you should have seen their faces!

Then I looked at all the thrown away targets by other shooters ( I prolly saw 25 targets). What a complete shock. The accuracy that I saw was horrendous...and these are the guys that go to the range! I was really shocked. Except for 2 targets that were absolutely awesome, the rest I bet averaged 6" groups or more. as the longest range is 100 yds, I was astounded. Most of these were rifle targets as well. What an eye opener. Have other people seen this as well or was this just an anomaly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Big-Al    0
Big-Al

The question is were they shooting freehand or bench rest? There is a huge difference in the groups you will get.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jwhawkridge    0
jwhawkridge

Cool! I was able to sight my 49 year old 30-30 (with a 35 year old scope) in at 80 yards: all six shots were within 6 inches of each other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CodyDawg    0
CodyDawg

Since this occurred at a range, I believe all the shots were benchrest shots.

Careful with the hammer on that 30/30, statistically, if it is a lever action, it is by far and away the most dangeroug gun out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BobT    104
BobT

Interesting statement, CodyDawg. I feel a gun is as dangerous as the person holding on to it.

Why do you feel the 30-30 lever is more dangerous than any other action? You might be referring to past models. With recent designs it is not possible to accidentally actuate the firing pin by hitting the hammer due to a safety plate that extends up between the hammer and pin. In fact, I would be more inclined to think that the latest design makes them as safe if not safer than any other type. My .44 pistol has this feature and it is perfectly safe to load all six chambers in the cylinder. Something considered a no-no in past revolvers.

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CodyDawg    0
CodyDawg

Yes Bob, I was referring to the 49 year old gun mentioned above. They have recently made changes to make them safer. Statistically, they are 3-4 times more likely than any other action to be involved in an accident according to the graph I have seen from the MN DNR. The exposed hammer and the fact that you have to cycle the cartridges through the chamber in order to unload it make it dangerous. Please note, before you hand a kid one of these, put some thought into it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
analyzer    2
analyzer

I was at the range recently in Oakdale. At 50 yards with a scope and rifled barrel on my shot gun I got about a 2-3" grouping, although, slightly up and left...

The open site was more like 6 inches, with an occasional stray.

I went to the 100 and didn't bother with the open, I don't have confidence to get a decent kill shot. was able to hit the colored portion in the middle that's about 4 inches in diameter, about 50% of the time. I think I'll restrict my shots to 75 yards or less.

What was interesting to me. One of the workers, working the 100 yard range, was shocked I could hit the target with ANY accuracy with a shotgun. He works there and didn't know it was possible.

So I looked at the other shooters on the 100 yard range, and they were all sighting in rifles. But the guy next to me had a 3-shot 1" grouping. I was impressed with the accuracy... he was dead on. But not free hand.

I've had lots of people tell me they can shoot a shotgun accurately to 100, some even to 120... it surprised me that a range worker had no clue. But then, maybe he doesn't work the long range often or something.

I don't have any issues with my shotgun, although, I have huge issues with buck fever, I definitely shake too much, and sort of counteract any ability I have to have a tight grouping... I'll have to buy one of those steady-sticks or whatever they call em.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
analyzer    2
analyzer

I think at my sons gun safety class, they told us they were the worst as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Deitz Dittrich    4
Deitz Dittrich

Some of the targets you may have seen were people sighting in... if there are bullets all over the paper, that would account for that. I myself would not be happy with a 6" group with a gun at 50 yds... I would be willing I could come fairly close to doing that with my bow...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EXTREME    0
EXTREME

I used to work at the "Rifle Sight in Days" in Grand Rapids and have seen some dandy's out there. One time a guy brought .30-30 Win. ammo for his 32 Win Special...didn't touch many riflings on the way down...didnt' hit the target much either. Another time a guy put his scope on with the left right function on the top. Another dandy was this kid brought in a shotgun one time that had no sights and a broken stock. He hit the paper one time out of 10 at 25 yards and called it good enough. The point I am trying to make here is that some people are really poor shots...others buy really poor equipment. I think we owe it to the deer to shoot good and practice. I don't think that 6" groups are out of the question at 100 yards because most people don't shoot that far....plus the vitals are bigger than that. But if you can't hit a paperplate off a bench everytime...you have some issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CNCMike    0
CNCMike

I used a 12 Ga with slugs from the age of 12 until 31. Then my wife bought me a 30-06 for deer. I never missed with the slug gun. I absolutely loved it. I love my 30-06 as well. I never used a scope on the 12 yet dropped a 6 point at @ 105 yards in 98. To be honest, I wouldn't allow myself to shoot either if my groupings at 100 yards were more than 4".

I can't understand the awe from these guys. You drop grouse and pheasant, ducks and geese with shotguns all the time, and they are flying. Why be shocked that you can be accurate with a still target? JM2C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CodyDawg    0
CodyDawg

I took into account that some people could be moving their scope. But you should see tight groups regardless and I certainly didnt see that. I was just really amazed at how poor the targets were. I knew there were some people that were bad shots, but man, there were soooo many. And at a range with sand bags and stuff, the groupings should be much, much better. Remember, the purpose of sighting in a gun is to sight in the GUN. Remove the human element. From what I saw, I would be willing to put my shotgun up against rifles anytime and it would win more than half the time. And that just shouldnt be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BobT    104
BobT

Quote:

I myself would not be happy with a 6" group with a gun at 50 yds...


Off a bench I would agree with this. Freehand would likely be much worse.

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ferny    0
Ferny

I have seen some pretty large groups and guy's pack up "ready to go" How many times do guy's show up that have just had a new scope mounted and bore sighted and don't hit paper at 100? They think it's magically going to hit the bulls eye! It's just to get you on paper at 25 yards isn't it?

I've noticed with my own big bore shooting that my groups get bigger if I shoot more than 1 box. I call it the painful flinch factor! You have to find the right ammo and work on your form to get tight groups with any gun.

I have to laugh at your Oakdale GC comment. I was over there sighting in my 30-06 semi auto last week. One of the old timer range snobs comes over and starts ridiculing my gun! "It's not a real gun unless it has a bolt" and "That thing must jam all the time" "I wouldn't rob a bank with it because it would jam" WOW! I had to laugh since they should be there to help! Your welcome for spending $15 supporting your club dork!!! Could imagine a new shooter hearing that and have his confidence eroded by an old snob like that?

Ferny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scott K    28
Scott K

I have a 11-87 remington, rifled barrel, cantel scope with a 1x4 Leupold scope on it. At 50yds 5 shots 1" grouping, 100yds 1.5-2" grouping, 150yds 5" grouping.

My 30-06, 3x9 Leupold scope, from 50-150 its within 1", 200yds starts to drop and vary abit more 3" with one being off 5". At 300yds it would drop about a foot, but all holes were within 6".

There is no comparison, rifle is much more accurate, but it depends on the shooter, wind, bullets, gun, and just how sore your shoulder gets! If you spend time sighting the scope or sights in, the better the shot you will be, I just seem to be picky, I want them within 1" at a 100yds, and I will keep at it until it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Blair Nelson    0
Blair Nelson

One thing I have noticed about watching people sight in is an absolute lack of bench technique. Helped friends get ready for an elk hunt by sighting in from a bench and they ignored the sandbags (front and back) until I showed them how to use 'em. Breathing and trigger squeeze matter too.

I was in the same boat as they were until I started handloading a couple of years ago. Nothing like a few hundred rounds of load development over a spring/summer to work on shooting technique and hone in on loads that shoot well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SkitterPopper    0
SkitterPopper

I agree with the previous poster. I think it is unethical to go out in the woods without be able to have a good grouping at the range. I heard a guy brag about not sighting in his gun in 5 years and it still knocks down deer. If you buy a license and want to harvest a deer, do everyone a favor and spend the two hours on a October afternoon and check your gun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cheetah    0
Cheetah

All this talk of people with poor gun skills doesn't surprise me too much. We see a lot of the same with archery. Very few people shoot in the off season, and then right before deer season opens they take their bows out and can hardly hit a paper plate at 20 yards and figure it's good enough. confused.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CodyDawg    0
CodyDawg

Just for the record, I did not mention any club where this took place.

Yeah, it sure eroded my confidence in the accuracy some live with and it surely enforced my belief that hunters stretch the truth as much as fisherman. My shotgun shoots almost identical to the one mentioned above, with a pretty similar setup. Beretta 390 with Hastings cantilever with a Burris 1.5X6 shooting Federal Barnes Expanders. We have 4 setups exactly like this (one is a 20 ga) in our party and all shoot exactly the same. 1" groups at 50 and 2" groups at 100. Like I said, based purely on what I saw I would put this shotgun up against rifles any day and would beat more than half of them. It wouldnt beat the good rifle shooters, but I no longer think there are that many of those out there!!

Kudos to those of you who have put in the time and patience to get your guns shooting accurately. Go ahead and slap yourself on the back. And the deer thank you too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
analyzer    2
analyzer

For the record, I want to note that I like Oakdale Gun Club. I think they run a smooth, safe operation, at least when I've been there. It was just the one comment that caught me off guard.

Dietz, I wasn't happy with a 6" grouping at 50 yards with my open sites... that's exactly why I bought a rifled barrel and a scope. Maybe it's my vision, or tendency to shake, but I needed the better accuracy I get from the latter...

However, my son is coming with me, and I couldn't afford another $200 for a second set up. So he'll get the scope and rifled barrel in his blind, where he's more likely to have a 50-75 yd shot.

I'll get the open sites, where I really don't anticipate much over 40... and most would be in the 25-30 yd range.

But it's different with a bow. You can't afford to stick him in the shoulder. If my slug hits his shoulder it's blowing right through and taking him down. With a slug, I generally aim 5-6 inches below the hump in his back. A little high I get vertebra, I little forward I get tracea, jugular, maybe portion of the lung, a little back I get lung, a little low I get both shoulders or heart. There's a fair amount of room for error. 6" grouping probably works, but considering my shake, I'd really prefer 3.

If I were bow hunting, I'd have to wait for quartering away, and put it in the exposed vital shot behind the leg...

READ Doctor Ken Nordburg's books on shot placement... and it doesn't necessarily have to be behind the leg, with a gun... in his opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
analyzer    2
analyzer

That was "whitetail hunters almanac" btw, 3rd edition maybe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
vister    0
vister

as far as grouping goes, are you using rifled slugs with the rifled barrel? i think that is a no no, as rifled slugs are for smoothbore barrels. rifled slugs are rifled to create the spin out of the barrel of a smoothbore. rifled barrels only make the spin worse, making them shoot all over the place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Deitz Dittrich    4
Deitz Dittrich

Analizer- Great post.. I wasn't posting to you personally! I hope you didn't take it as such... I respect you all that much more for giving the more accurate firearm to your child.. That is great.. get them hooked on hunting/fishing!!!! I wish you and your family the best of luck this season!!!

The kill area is quite large on an animal... off by 6" will usually do the job quite well.. I only state that we do our best to make the best shot in case that we are off by more than that 6"....

You seem quite in tune with knowing what is a humane shot!. and I commend you for that, and assume you are teaching that to your children as well!!! Cudo's to you!

Good luck!!! and please post picts when you harvest!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Donk    0
The Donk

I guess confidence would play a big part in it, I bring my gun out a couple weeks before opener and fire 2 sets of 3 through it, 3 from 30 yards, and 3 from about 125. Its always the same, a grouping of an inch or 2 and a grouping of 3-4 inches. I think its good to check, but the gun/scope shouldn't have moved from last year unless you dropped it boys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
analyzer    2
analyzer

Thanks Deitz, I'd like to post a pic of last years buck, and the story, but I don't know how.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Posts

    • PakAttack86
      I've been fishing all my life, but I've only recently started seriously catfishing. I've discovered a spot near my home on the Minnesota river where the current comes to a still near a small, no longer active dam where there are rocks and tons of baitfish, which I assume should be a good spot for big flatheads. I've fished this spot a few days now and have only successfully pulled out a small flathead of maybe 5 or 6 pounds on a medium sized live sucker about a foot below a bobber. For your experienced catters, what's the best approach for big cats this time of year? Do you prefer live bait or cut bait? When using cut bait are heads or filets better? Since MN only allows one rod out should I be focusing my bait near the bottom of the river or a couple feet under a bobber? I tend to fish between 7pm-10pm although I'd like to try more late night fishing. Thanks for any suggestions!
    • OhioVike
    • OhioVike
      Had similar issues.  I was up for three weeks, each week it was a different set of boats encroaching.  I don't think you can do to much about the one week fishermen. They are in a panic to find fish and when the see one go in the boat, look out. One time,  I was looping in and out of a small spot picked up nice fish and this guy comes in right on that spot and starts jigging.  I couldn't even get back to it.  He would have never know it was there.  I just leave and find more fish.  
    • RoosterMan
      Definitely that time of year again.  Load the boat full of kids and put the raps out and be prepared to catch a lot of fish.  Only gets better from here.  Pic of my son and his cousin and their limits.  Good memories being made.
    • Rick
      When archery deer season opens Saturday, Sept. 16, mandatory testing for chronic wasting disease and restrictions on moving deer carcasses begins again in southeastern Minnesota’s CWD management zone, deer permit area 603.  “With archery deer season approaching, hunters are encouraged to plan ahead and be aware of the testing that will be required and the specifics about when they can and can’t move carcasses out of the CWD zone,” said Lou Cornicelli, wildlife research manager for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Archery hunters in deer permit area (DPA) 603 will be required to submit the head from all adult deer 1 year old or older so lymph nodes can be tested for CWD. Hunters cannot remove the carcass or carcass remains from the CWD zone until a negative test result is reported. Carcass movement restrictions do allow hunters to immediately transport out of the zone quarters or other deer pieces without spinal column parts; boned-out meat; and antlers with a skull plate that is free of brain matter. Hunters should check page 65 of the 2017 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations Handbook for additional information. “Archery deer hunters also should check the DNR website for the DPA boundary map,” Cornicelli said. “As a reminder, the CWD management zone was created from DPAs 347 and 348, so hunters need to be mindful of what area they’re hunting.” Hunters are required to register their deer. DNR will allow phone and Internet registration during the archery season in the CWD zone. The system will be monitored for compliance and may be turned off if needed. Mandatory testing and carcass movement restrictions will remain in effect for area 603 throughout deer seasons for archery, firearm, muzzleloader and any late season hunts. Head collection boxes will be located in: Chatfield: Magnum Sports, 1 1st St., 507-867-4399. Preston: DNR area forestry office, 912 Houston St., 507-765-2740. Lanesboro: DNR area fisheries office, 23789 Grosbeak Rd., 507-467-2442. Wykoff: Goodies and Gas, 104 E Front St., 507-352-2421. Harmony: Oak Meadow Meats, 50 9th St., 507-886-6328 Archery hunters should do the following: Field dress (gut) deer as normal. Register deer via phone, internet or walk-in big game registration station. If harvest occurs late in the day, sample (head) submission and registration do not have to occur on the same day. If the deer will be mounted, a video showing how to properly cape your deer is available at bitly.com/capeadeer. Remove the head, leaving at least 4 inches of neck attached. Hunters can take meat out of the zone immediately but the carcass (head with brain and spinal column) cannot be moved outside deer permit area 603 until a negative test result is received so hunters must: Make arrangements to refrigerate the carcass before the deer is processed; Cut deer into quarters or other pieces; or Bone-out the meat. Ensure no spinal column or brain matter is included with the meat or on the antlers. Properly dispose of carcass remains. There will be a dumpster at the DNR forestry office in Preston for hunters who don’t have a way to dispose of remains. The Preston dumpster is being provided as a courtesy for deer carcass disposal only. It will be removed if people attempt to process deer there or use the dumpster for trash disposal. Bring the entire head of deer to one of five head box collection sites. Each collection box has specific instructions on how to properly submit the head for sampling. Put heads in the plastic bags provided. Use the maps provided at each box to mark an “X” where the deer was harvested. Submit this map with sample. Samples during the archery season will be submitted for testing on Mondays and Thursdays. It may take up to four business days for test results to be available.  CWD test results can be searched using a nine-digit MDNR number online at www.mndnr.gov/cwdcheck. Deer hunters should regularly check the DNR’s CWD website at mndnr.gov/cwd for the most recent information. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • delcecchi
      That's ok.   Bass, Pike, Musky more fun anyway. 
    • delcecchi
      I don't know if fishing is better or worse in Minnesota, but you can get a perfectly adequate fishing boat for under 20k,  under 10k if you are ok with used.   For example, a boat like this would totally do everything you want to do... http://hotspotoutdoors.com/forums/topic/181008-2005-lund-explorer-1600-with-merc-60hp-4-stroke-efi-fully-loaded/ I don't know if this is a good price or a good boat, but you get the picture...
    • Rick
      Firearms and muzzleloader hunters who want to harvest antlerless deer in a deer permit area designated as lottery this hunting season are reminded they must purchase their license by Thursday, Sept. 7. Hunters who purchase their license before this date are automatically entered into the lottery for the deer permit area or special hunt area they declare.  This season, antlerless deer permits are issued by lottery in 48 of Minnesota’s 130 deer permit areas. No application is needed to take antlerless deer in permit areas with hunters choice, managed or intensive designations. Hunters who want to participate in special firearm deer hunts also need to apply for permits that are issued through a lottery, and the application deadline is Sept. 7. More information about deer permit areas, how their designations are set and special hunts is available on the deer page and in the 2017 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations Handbook. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Beginning Friday, Sept. 1, hunters can access 26,700 acres of private land across 46 counties in western and south-central Minnesota through the Walk-In Access program.  “Finding land for hunting can be a challenge,” said Scott Roemhildt, Walk-In Access coordinator for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “Walk-In Access allows hunters to access high-quality private land and makes it easier for landowners to allow that access.” The Walk-In Access program pays landowners to allow hunter access. Hunters with a $3 Walk-In Access validation may hunt during legal hunting hours, during open hunting seasons from Sept. 1 to May 31. No additional landowner contact is necessary. More than 230 sites across 46 counties are available through the program. Bright yellow-green signs have been placed on Walk-In Access boundaries. Hunting seasons open Sept. 1 for mourning doves, crows, snipe, sora and Virginia rails. Hunting seasons open Saturday, Sept. 16, for several small game species including squirrels and rabbits. The Minnesota pheasant hunting season opens Saturday, Oct. 14. Maps of all Walk-In Access sites are available electronically at mndnr.gov/walkin. Printed atlases can be found across the 46-county area at DNR license agents, DNR wildlife offices and county soil and water conservation district offices. Atlases are also available by calling the DNR Information Center at 888-646-6367. “Walk-In Access works because hunters respect the land and that respect encourages landowners to enroll their land,” Roemhildt said. “We are glad to talk with landowners who are considering the program,” Roemhildt said. “We hope to grow the program to 30,000 acres by 2018.” Parcels enrolled in the Walk-In Access program must be at least 40 acres in size with high quality cover. Most land is also enrolled in private land conservation programs. The next enrollment period will begin in January 2018. The Walk-In Access program began in 2011 and is currently funded through 2018 with a three-year grant from the Natural Resources Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Other funding sources come through a surcharge on nonresident hunting licenses, a one-time appropriation from the Minnesota Legislature in 2012, and donations from hunters. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed the invasive algae starry stonewort in Lake Minnewaska in Pope County. This is the second new confirmation of starry stonewort in a Minnesota lake in 2017.  DNR invasive species specialists confirmed an abundant growth of starry stonewort among native aquatic plants in the narrow Lake Minnewaska marina off the main body of the lake. Additional searches are being conducted to determine whether it is anywhere beyond the marina. Treatment options are being considered. Starry stonewort has never been eradicated from any U.S. lake, but treatment can help ease lake access and water-based recreational activities. There are now 11 lakes in Minnesota where starry stonework has been confirmed. Two were confirmed in 2015, seven in 2016, and two this year. It has been present in at least some of these lakes for several years, rather than being spread to many lakes in a just a year or two. Since the first case was confirmed in 2015, all but one have been reported in the month of August, when the telltale star-shaped bulbils are most abundant and visible. Now is the best time of year to look for it. Information on how to identify starry stonewort can be found on the DNR’s website, and any suspicious plants should be reported to the DNR. Starry stonewort is an alga that can form dense mats, which can interfere with use of a lake and compete with native plants. It is most likely spread when fragments have not been properly cleaned from trailered boats, personal watercraft, docks, boat lifts, anchors or other water-related equipment. This new confirmation reminds boaters and anglers to follow Minnesota laws to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species: Clean aquatic plants and animals from watercraft; Drain all water by removing drain plugs and keep drain plugs out while transporting watercraft; and Dispose of unwanted bait in the trash. Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody, especially after leaving infested waters: Spray with high-pressure water. Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees Fahrenheit for at least two minutes or 140 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 10 seconds). Dry for at least five days. Details about starry stonewort and other aquatic invasive species are available on the aquatic invasive species page. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.