Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

  • Announcements

    • Rick

      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
Sign in to follow this  
Phunnyfarm

Deer Opener Superstitions/essential traditions

Recommended Posts

Phunnyfarm

I know you've got them! What are they?!

My wife suggested trying a different pizza place on the Friday night of Deer opener, different than the place we've always used on Deer Opener Eve. I gently had to tell her that we should stick with what we have always had (without getting into the reasons why!).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scott K

I have always had some beer the night before, seems to work good at our camp! Except last year I drank captain cokes, found that to be unlucky grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bigbucks

I always take my gun...

Seriously, I always try to buy a different kind of scent than what I've been using during bow season. Of course lately I've hunted nowhere near my gun stand during bow season, but that's what I do. I try to get some Pete Ricards Indian Buck Lure, just because I've used that many times & had good luck. Now I can honestly say I don't think I've ever had a deer follow that scent, but you were talking about superstitions. I've rarely had deer act like they were upset by my scent during opening day though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smnduck

Before I load my gun I kiss the bullet goin in the chamber.

When I see a deer comin towards me I squint my eyes so he won't catch me eyeballin him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HunterLee

I try to make sure i load my gun. But my first morning spot is picked on a whim. I do quite a bit of spotting the week or so before opener, and guess where the bucks might be a sunrise. It seems that if i don't get a good buck the opener before 8:30am, i wait til muzzleloader. Last year nice 9, year before, last day of muzzleloader, nice 10, then it was a couple decent 8's the first mornings, and finally my first big buck was a 140's-150's 10 pointer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coach1310

Essential traditions.....

lack of motivation at work for weeks prior.....unable to focus on anything but camp and hunting....making a list, checking it twice and still forgetting toilet paper....while easing to the stand perfectly, snapping a twig with your last step that you swore can be heard for miles...telling everyone to "stack 'em like cord wood", ...Friday night around the fire tell the same stories we have for years and they are better everytime...toss and turn so much you're not sure why you are even in bed....try to take a minute to be thankful for the opportunity to spend time with friends in camp and the peaceful time in the woods

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
eyecrosser2000

Yes, Phunny, traditions I have 'em. It starts the week leading up to the opener--I wear the "parade of deer sweatshirts" to work. I had to give up my favorite (a running buck in the crosshairs with the title "Real Drag Hunting Club" on it) after I accidentally on purpose got some gut blood all over the sleeves one year; my wife wouldn't let me wear it anywhere. Then we watch Jeff Foxworthy's Incomplete Deer Hunter Series on Friday & Friday night. I put on the lucky deer socks from Legendary Whitetails. I always take a BEFORE (Friday night) and AFTER (Saturday morning at 4:00 a.m.) picture with a digital cam and put it in our yearly family video. But our best tradition is our morning pre-hunt prayer/blessing before we head out...can't count how many times the guy praying gets a deer, almost to the point guys are fighting over who says it!

I never get bored or tired of all the traditions of the hunt. The hunt and all its shenanigans is one of the few things that has remained pure over all the years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Grant Pearson

traditions at our cabin is laying everything out the night before and making sure we have everything we might need (extra shells, TP, etc), packing it back up, getting the guns ready by putting one last light coat of oil on and try to go to bed. The next morning, we get up and at least two of us will unpack our bags, check to make sure they have everything and repack. At 4:30 in the morning, you can't really remember the entire list, and inevitably someone forgets to repack something. And that something usually is one of the first things needed. Then, when we get dressed, we step outside and no one is allowed to go to the stand until everyone is outside and ready to go. A little ribbing ensues while waiting for the stragglers and we all head to our respective stands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phunnyfarm

Quote:

Before I load my gun I kiss the bullet goin in the chamber.


I don't know why, but I started doing that the first time I went deer hunting too. It's been GREAT luck for me too. Also, if I go out and sit in the stand and don't see a single deer, I'll replace the bullet with another one the next time I go out to try and change my luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TrophyEyes

If I don't see a deer for 4 hours, I change out the chambered round and put in a "Fresh" one. Obviously because the other round wasn't lucky. Everytime I do that my luck changes. Maybe its because I am awake?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DonBo

Quote:

Everytime I do that my luck changes. Maybe its because I am awake?


Awake is good! I try to stay awake opening morning. After that the tag is filled and I can nap all I want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bassboy1645

traditions: Lack of sleep for three days/nights before, speak to the rifle, tell the same stories, study maps and air photos some moe, and weather channel before bed.

Superstitions: Kissing the bullet, not cleaning guns fear of oil scent, and knowing your going to have a good hunting day if you can see your breath floating to hunter Orion in the night sky. GOD I LOVE DEER HUNTING!!!!!!! grin.gifgrin.gifgrin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BKB

Hoping to not see any deer on the way to the hunting land or busting one out in the dark on the way to the stand, never been a good sign for me if either of those happen but in the end I always say that if I'm meant to get one I will.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tenpoint

Opening morning I hunt with the old 30-30 long barrel my grandpa gave me when I was 10. After that I use my 06.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
harvey lee

I really dont have any. I use to have to go to the bar the night before and have a few so I could sleep. Now, I go to sleep, get up and go hunting. I still enjoy deer hunting but I do not get near as thrilled as I once did.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
icecold

Years ago I would go to the bar and party stay out half the night come home smelling like smoke, sleep a couple hours and go out to my stand, and usally about 7;30 or 8 i had my buck, Now that Im older and married and dont go out and party, in bed before 8 pm on the night before deer hunting ,I havent got a deer the past couple seasons, Maybe I need to go out and party it up and stay out half the night again, and see if my luck changes. grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bassboy1645

ABSOLUTELY!! I hunt like 24/7 and bow hunt too but theres just something majical about gun season grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
iceman16

i have alot of the same Superstitions/essential traditions as all of you. changing out bullets after every hunt that i dont bag a buck. kissin it. it used to be opening night crown and water cheer that night but now i dont get to camp tell 3 in the morning because of work. then during the week we head to the neighboring cheese heads shack for dinner to look at there bucks and have a couple smoothies (best old fashions ever) as well. Then the next day they come over to our shack and do the same. not sleepin for weeks before imagining that 10 pointer comin into the clear cut him stoppin pull the trigger and down in his tracks. hmmm cant wait.

iceman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CanOCorn

Wear the same blue long sleeve shirt every year for the last 14 years. I was wearing it when I shot my first big buck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
analyzer

I'm a little embarrassed to say, but my son and I have a tradition of driving to the nearest movie theatre Saturday evening for a flick... we do every year, and sometimes, the nearest theatre aint that near. A couple times we had to drive 1 1/2 hours one-way. Kinda nuts, but it's tradition.

We always have steak first night.

I always wash our clothes in that scent killer stuff, and then line dry. Well, I stick it on the fence. Have you ever tried to dry your clothes outside in 40 degree weather? (Contact Us Please) near impossible.

I like the one guys tradition. He doesnt try to block his scent at all. In fact, once a week, all year, he takes a sweaty shirt of his, and goes and sticks it near his hunting location (I couldn't do that, I hunt hours away, but I suppose a bow hunter who hunts locally could). His theory is, if his smell is there, all the time, the deer get used to him. Plus they see him coming and going all year, and eventually decide he's no threat. He seems to have pretty good success.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kyle

I know people that also do that. They will even go so far as to take a crap in a bucket in the spring, and then leave the bucket underneath their stand for the rest of the year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
woody1975

How many people love to see the blaze orange hangin on the lines and porches on the way to your shack?

We go up Thursday every year and get the stands set-up and have a few. This year we rented a boat (4 boats in the group and we are renting) to try and catch a few walleyes.

Gettin' Pumped up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
analyzer

I forgot, we like to go out friday night, NO ammo or guns, with one of those 3 million candle watt lights, and shine the deer in the fields. It's legal before 10pm, and a ton of fun. Really gets the adrenaline going for the next morning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TKO_PUNCH

Friday night we all sit outside and wait for a falling star. The 1st person to spot it gets to pray to the deer gods.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HuskerBen

Our essential tradition is the presentation of the traveling trophy. It is given by last year's winner, to whoever he chooses. Last year, it went to my Dad for an outstanding buck he shot the previous year.

After the presentation, we drink beer and talk about football and fishing and hunting and women. In about that order.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Posts

    • smurfy
      looks like cow bay!!!!!!!!!! nice fish.
    • eyeguy 54
    • Hoey
      I have not heard any reasons for the purported relocation.  Just thinking out loud here - Walker Bay has not had enough ice in many of the past years, so they have to hold the event on shore and not on the lake.  There is limited space for a shore event there.  Maybe Bemidji makes more ice and/or they have more on-shore accommodations.  Walker itself is more of a tourist and family town and the Pout Fest is not that.  
    • Rick
      Hunters are reminded to register deer before processing, before antlers are removed and within 48 hours after taking the animal, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.  “Deer registration provides information that is essential to our ability to manage deer populations,” said Steve Merchant, wildlife populations and regulations manager. “Hunters are required to register deer and it’s a fairly simple process.” Hunters register deer with a phone call, online or in person. Before registering a deer, hunters must validate their site tag. The validated tag must be attached to the deer when the deer is placed on a motor vehicle or an ATV, a vehicle or a trailer being towed by an ATV or brought into a camp, yard or other place of habitation. Phone registration
      Register deer via phone by calling 888-706-6367. Directions are printed on each deer hunting license. Have a pen or permanent marker ready. A confirmation number will be given; it must be written on the license and site tag. Internet registration
      Register deer via internet at mndnr.gov/gameregistration. Directions will be similar to phone registration, and a confirmation number must be written on the license and site tag. In-person registration
      When phone or internet registration is not possible, hunters must take their deer to a big-game registration station. The person whose name appears on the license must be present at the registration station with their deer. They will receive a big-game possession tag that must be attached to the hind leg, ear or antler where the site tag was attached. A list of all stations organized by city and county is available at any DNR wildlife office or at mndnr.gov/hunting/deer. During registration, the hunter must use the permit area number where the deer was harvested; using the wrong deer permit area for registration is illegal. Registration instructions for all methods are available at mndnr.gov/gameregistrationhelp. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • BrianF
      Hi Jim, the problem with channels on Tonka is not only the current, which keeps the ice thin all winter, but also due to the effects of road salt/chemicals.  Many of the channels have bridges over them which receive a lot of automobile traffic.  In the winter, road salt/chemicals are pour on the roads during adverse weather conditions.  Cars and especially snow plows cause the salt/chemicals to splash over the guard rails and onto the ice.  When you see new reports of cars going thru the ice on channels, it's usually right under a road overpass, for this reason.  Because of the road salts, channels are just a super dangerous place to be, even during our coldest winters.  
    • Hookmaster
      I'm pretty sure there is still a winter only access on Smith's bay just north of where hiway 51 intersects hiway 15 at the lake.  It's just before the North Shore Marina. You'd have to trailer to there but then you'd have the main lake to fish.
    • Rick
      Pheasants banded in Nobles and Redwood counties Pheasant hunters can voluntarily report roosters that were banded as part of a study being conducted by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.  DNR Farmland Wildlife Populations and Research Group workers captured and banded roosters during a research project. The two study areas involved in the project are the Lamberton Wildlife Management Area complex in Redwood County and the Worthington Wells Project Area south of Worthington, located in Nobles County. Although the study is focused on hen pheasants and their broods, roosters were also opportunistically captured in an attempt to collect survival information on males. A plain metal leg band with a unique identifying number was placed on the right leg of each rooster. Hunters are asked to contact the Farmland Wildlife Research Group to report harvest information. The band number, date of harvest, and location information (WMA name or GPS coordinates preferred) are requested. If hunters want information on when and where the bird was initially captured, they may also provide their contact information so that researchers can return their call. GPS locations and personal data will not be made public. Although Minnesota has a rooster-only hunting season, hunters who come across a dead radio-collared and/or banded hen are also asked to call with information so that researchers can refine their hen data. To voluntarily report birds marked as part of this study, contact Lindsey Messinger, 507-642-8478, ext. 224. Alternatively, people may contact Lindsey by email at Lindsey.Messinger@state.mn.us. This work is funded in part through the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act. Additional details about pheasant hunting are available at mndnr.gov/hunting/pheasant. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, in conjunction with the Michigan and Wisconsin natural resources departments, will take questions about the Lake States Forest Bat Habitat Conservation Plan at 3 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 31. The phone conference is for anyone interested in the integration of forest practices with conservation measures to support bat populations.  Forest bat populations are rapidly declining, and one or more species may soon be reclassified as endangered. If reclassified, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provides the opportunity to develop a Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP). An HCP helps endangered species recover by setting out habitat conservation plans during land management activities. In preparation, Minnesota and neighboring states are developing a forest bat HCP that aims to maintain bat habitat and allow important forest management activities to continue. Input from forest land owners, forest managers, conservation groups and other stakeholders is essential to developing an effective HCP. An introductory video describing the HCP process and how to participate is available at https://youtu.be/46IAHTaqJQE. The DNR encourages participants to watch the video prior to the Oct. 31 question and answer session. To access the session, in the ten minutes prior to the call start time, participants should dial 855-802-6790 toll-free and, at the prompt, enter the conference ID code 93441291. Anyone requiring an accommodation to participate in the phone conference is asked to email bathcp.dnr@state.mn.us or call 651-259-5919 as early as possible. More information is available at mndnr.gov/bathcp.   Contact: Lindsey Messinger, wildlife research biologist, 507-642-8478, ext. 224.   Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      A video about how to get deer tested for chronic wasting disease is available on the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources website at mndnr.gov/cwd.  “Getting a deer tested for CWD only takes a few minutes and the video takes hunters through steps that make the process go smoothly, such as positioning their deer so the head is easily accessed in the vehicle,” said Lou Cornicelli, wildlife research manager. Testing will be required in portions of north-central, central and southeast Minnesota during the opening weekend of firearms deer season. “We want to thank hunters for cooperating during this sampling process,” Cornicelli said. Precautionary testing from 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 4, to Sunday, Nov. 5, will determine whether chronic wasting disease may have spread from captive deer to wild deer in central and north central Minnesota. Central Minnesota deer permit areas with mandatory testing are 218, 219, 229, 277, 283 and 285. North central Minnesota deer permit areas with mandatory testing are 155, 171, 172, 242, 246, 247, 248 and 249. Testing in north central and central Minnesota became necessary after CWD was found in multiple captive deer on farms near Merrifield in Crow Wing County and Litchfield in Meeker County. Test results will determine whether CWD may have potentially been passed from these captive deer to wild deer. Deer harvested in southeast Minnesota’s permit areas 343, 345, 346, 347, 348 and 349 also are subject to mandatory testing on Nov. 4-5 because they are adjacent to permit area 603, the only area of Minnesota currently known to have CWD-infected wild deer. All hunters in affected deer permit areas will be required to have their harvested deer tested Nov. 4-5. After field dressing their deer, hunters must take them to a sampling station. DNR staff will remove lymph nodes, which will be submitted for laboratory testing. Hunters must register their deer by phone, internet or in person at any big game registration station. Harvest registration will not be available at CWD sampling stations. For sampling to accurately detect whether CWD exists in wild deer, the DNR needs hunters’ help to collect 3,600 samples in the north central area, 1,800 in the central area and 1,800 in the southeast. Proactive surveillance and precautionary testing for disease is a proven strategy that allows DNR to manage CWD by finding it early and reacting quickly and aggressively to control it. These actions, which were initiated in 2005 to successfully combat bovine tuberculosis in northwestern Minnesota deer and in 2011 to eliminate a CWD infection in wild deer near Pine Island, provide the best opportunity to eliminate disease spread. Hunters not in a mandatory testing area can collect their own lymph node sample and submit it for testing to the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Minnesota for a fee. A video showing how to collect a lymph node sample and a link to the lab’s website are at mndnr.gov/cwdcheck. Complete information about mandatory CWD testing, sampling station locations and a related precautionary feeding ban, which includes salt and mineral licks in all areas and attractants such as estrus urine in southeastern Minnesota, are available on the DNR website at mndnr.gov/cwd. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      State wildlife chief addresses upcoming season and future challenges By Paul Telander, DNR wildlife chief When Minnesota’s deer season ends Sunday, Dec. 31, it is quite likely the harvest will be in the 200,000 range.  This Minnesota Department of Natural Resources projection is above last year’s harvest of 173,213, below the 2003 record harvest of 290,525 and similar to the most recent 20-year average of 205,959. Prior to 2000, deer harvests in excess of 200,000 occurred only four times. Deer harvest totals typically relate to the size of the deer population and to a lesser degree to weather conditions immediately before and during the hunting season. On the 2017 season
      This should be a good deer season barring any unforeseen unusual weather. Deer numbers are up following three years of conservative harvest regulations designed to rebuild the population, coupled with three relatively mild winters. As a result, more antlerless permits are available this year, and hunters in many parts of the state will have additional opportunities to harvest more deer because of other more liberal season framework changes. Unfavorable weather, like heavy snowfall immediately before or during the hunting season, is the main factor that would prevent a harvest increase. On putting 2017 in context
      The highest deer harvests occurred during the early to mid-1990s and from 2000-2008. During this latter period, the harvest topped 200,000 each year. The high harvests in the early 2000s occurred at a time when the over-riding harvest strategy was to reduce the deer population so it wouldn’t grow out of control, as had happened in certain eastern states, and to address certain environmental, economic and social concerns. Deer harvests in excess of 225,000 occurred only once in the 1990s. Going further back, the harvests in the 1970s never topped 100,000. The harvests in the 1980s were under 150,000. Today, there’s growing discussion in the hunting community as to what’s a reasonable harvest target, and that’s a good conversation to have. On managing toward population goals
      Our aim is to keep deer numbers at population goals identified during DNR’s periodically occurring public goal-setting processes. There are 130 different deer permit areas throughout the state, and nearly all permit areas have a numeric population goal range. Population goals range from as low as a handful of deer per square mile in intensively farmed areas to 20 to 25 deer per square mile in prime forested areas. A few permit areas are too small or have too low of a harvest to model the local population. Deer numbers are at or have exceeded population goals over most of the state. Some northeast and southwest permit areas are slightly below goal. Parts of central Minnesota and southeastern Minnesota are above goal. From an overall, statewide perspective, we’re not far from where we believe Minnesota should be. On DNR transparency
      Many hunters are curious as to how we make our decisions on antlerless permit numbers and season structure, and that’s something we are trying to more effectively communicate. The process starts immediately after the deer season closes. That’s when area wildlife supervisors and staff monitor deer harvest results in their local areas and collect informal feedback from hunters, conservation officers, foresters and others. In spring, after winter severity has been monitored and deer mortality losses have been estimated, research staff run population models for each permit area based on the last year’s harvest, winter mortality, anticipated fawn births, predation and other data. These calculations are the basis of research staff recommendations for season permit area designations (lottery, managed, intensive harvest, etc.) and the number of antlerless permits that should be made available to hunters in each lottery permit area in order to achieve population goals. Research staff recommendations are sent to all area wildlife supervisors, who then have the option of agreeing with them or modifying them based on their own local observations and informal input. Often, these recommendations agree with each other, but not always. When this happens, differences get resolved at the regional or St. Paul office level. Ultimately, the agreed upon season structures and number of permits to be issued for each area are communicated to hunters through the multi-colored deer map that is part of the hunting regulations booklet and a new, more informative interactive deer map on the DNR website at mndnr.gov/deermap. On managing expectations
      That’s perhaps the hardest part of deer management, and it’s often a function of scope and scale. Our agency’s focus is on the big picture and a half million hunters. Conversely, the individual hunter is most interested in what’s happening within their immediate hunting area, which is often as little as 40 acres. It’s not well-known but among 13 Midwestern states, only Missouri manages deer populations at a finer spatial scale than Minnesota. We are serious about managing expectations and deer numbers in small geographic areas. Still, it is common to have a wide variety of opinions in each area on whether there should be more, fewer or different sized deer. To that point, we recently conducted a hunter satisfaction survey and one of the findings is that today’s hunters have higher expectations than those who hunted just 10 years ago. On communicating with hunters
      When I began my career it was common to interact with hunters at deer registration stations and local field offices. Today with the ease, convenience and popularity of phone and internet game registration, the DNR no longer has staff at deer registration stations. And people don’t visit DNR offices like they once did because so much information is available on the DNR website. Our challenge is finding new and efficient ways to have two-way conversations with hunters. This past winter we received more than 1,400 comments during a three-month long deer management plan public input effort. We were pleased with the response yet those 1,400 comments from an engaged and important audience represent only a minute fraction of the hunting public. There’s an irony in the fact that even though it is easier to be connected to one another these days because of smartphones and other technology, many people feel less connected than they once did. Figuring out how to maintain strong relations with hunters and other stakeholders is something on which we need to keep working. Minnesota’s first-ever deer plan will outline key concepts and crucial, ongoing work needed to manage deer, one of the state’s most popular and economically vibrant natural resources. An important aspect of the plan is how DNR will reach out and communicate deer management needs, necessary actions and reasons for those actions. A draft plan will be available in early 2018. I encourage everyone to read the draft plan, consider DNR’s suggested approach and give us your feedback and ideas through the public input opportunities we’ll make available. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.