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Rather_B_Fishing

Hunting Boots and Tree Stands

10 posts in this topic

I am going shopping in the next day or 2 to pick up some hunting boots and a tree stand.

As far as the boots, I want them to be waterproof and warm, as well as quiet (not squeaky) and scent free (doesn't retain great amounts of scent) as possible.

As far as tree stands, I understand there to be 3 basic types - ladder, climbing, and hanging. It seems that the ladder would be the bulkiest, but the easiest to get up and down once set. It seems the climbing one would be easier to tote around, but more of a pain to come up and down.

I got some great advice regarding holding a bow steady in a previous post. Now I am hoping that some of you can weigh in with your thoughts on purchasing the boots and the stand .

Thanks.

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You will probably get a ton of advice on this topic.

I suggest getting a pair of rubber type boots...I have not yet...but wish I had when I bought a pair or "regular" boots a couple years ago. The rubber type boots can have up to 2000 grams of thinsulate...so they are just as warm or warmer than other types of hunting boots....not to mention they are more waterproof and contain scent better than "regular" hunting boots.

As far as a stand...depending on what kind of woods you'll probably be hunting...I'd suggest a nice, Aluminum (lighter than steel), hang-on stand with tree pegs or climbing steps as it will probably be your most versatile stand (being able to use in various kinds/shapes of trees). However, if you are hunting in an area that suits climbing stands (tall, straight trees, with limbs starting up high)...they are tough to beat as you can move spots much easier.

Have fun shopping.

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I'm a big "MUCK BOOT" fan. I see that there are know off's now that have the "Scent Loc" technology for what ever that is worth.

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I never used a climbing tree stand for years as many told me they wouldn't work very well in all trees. They were right that there are some trees that it will not work in but that goes for almost all tree stands. Ifr you have a good limb saw, one can climb and cut as you go. One just cannot have a real crooked tree or one with a huge branch. I used hang on stands for years but always hated the tree steps that had to be put into the tree and setting the hang on up.

For me, the climbers works almost every where I hunt and is easy to go up and down a tree and it sits better than anything else out there.

Ladders stands I have also used and own but choose not to use them very often as they are rather heavy to carry into and out of the woods and one needs to make numerous trips. They do sit preety nice though.

I would guess that if you are in an area thats not all pine or crooked trees, to go with a climber. It will go into more trees than one believes.

As for the boots, I use rubber scent Lox boots until it gets rather cold, below 10. Then I go with a boot type footwear. The Muck line is a pretty nice boot.

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Tree Stands-

I have one or more of each type. This will be my first year using the climber so I cannot comment much on it, but I like how portable and lite it is. If you get a decent one, it shouldnt be to hard to get up and down as well as sit in for long periods. I like my ladder stand for simplicity, but I don't move it much once I find a good tree. My hang on stand is nice, but it is bulky (one can get smaller ones). Setting it up isn't too bad, but it goes much better with a partner. If you are hunting alone and have the right trees, I would get a good climber.

Boots-

Lots of good boots. I just bought a pair of cabelas rubber boots with 1000 grams of thinsulate. So far I love them. They are scent free and quiet.

As some one else said, enjoy the shopping.

-cupper

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I hunt exclusively with ladderstands. The ladder stands are pretty portable, can be put up in a very little amount of time, and are the most sturdy. I don't like heights and have never felt comfortable with a hanging stand. I have a climber that does work well, but I haven't used it in years because it got old and noisy, but the new ones are much nicer and comfortable. I don't hunt in areas with a lot straight trees either.

As for boots, I'm not sure what you are looking for. Warmth ? Traction? Scent control? Personally, I have never thought that the boots really mattered. I usually try and step in cow crap while on my way to the stand. I haven't had a deer blow my trail yet and have had numerous deer go right across it. I like the normal boots for ankle support, comfort, and warmth. I usually only go up to 800 grams. THere are some really nice boots out there. Try a few on and see what you think.

If you are looking at boots for warmth, realize that very few boots have insusation on the bottom of the boot and most boots can't stop the really cold stuff. Good luck.

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For boots it is a personal preference here. I have some rubber Browning boots with like 1000 grams of thinslate. They are not the warmest but also can be used when it is warm out. Good socks ususally fix that problem. They do not hold scent because they are rubber and have a nice lugged sole like my Danners. I would not invest in those scent lock cause with rubber boots they don't hold scent anyways.

As far as stands go I have all three. I have a Ladder at my rifle hunting spot. I have an aluminum hang on at one of my bow spots on Private land and I also have a Summit cliber which is my favorite since most everywhere I hunt has suitable trees. By far the hang on Aluminum is the most versatile but a pain to set up and move around. If you go this route get a hang on ladder sure tree steps are cheap but they are terrible to use on a regular basis if you ever move around. My favorite tree stand though is my summit Goliath by far. This is the most comfortable stand I have ever hunted out of and I really can't think of a time when I couldn't find a tree to use it in providing there were trees at all. If I was going to buy 1 Stand I would go with a Summit climber period. They are a bit pricey at around $240 but belive me when I say they are worth every penny once you hunt out of it. They are like a Fish trap for the trees. Talk about mobility here! Only negative is they are so comfortable that you may fall asleep!!

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Rather B

Jump in the truck and go hit Cabelas in Rogers.

Last year I was in need of new boots, and went there, sat down and started trying them on. Bottom line, some fit bad, some fit good, and the pair I bought was like it was made for me. The beauty was that the pair that fit perfect, was on the clearance rack too. Half off. They were boots that at regular price were out of my target range, but on clearance they fell right where I wanted. The staff there was excellent in asking questions about what application you plan to use them for the most.

As far as stands. I am 100% ladderstand. I am like 96trigger, I just dont like heights, and the ladderstand gives me comfort because of its stability. I have no reason to go with a type thats easier to get in and out of the woods. I use an ATV on private property to haul the ladderstands around. Hands down, ladderstands fit 100% of my needs.

PS-Cabelas had literally hundreds of ladderstands in the clearance tent a couple weeks back when I was there. The cheapest was $59.99.

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Boots- I'd look for some tall slip on type rubber ones, with enough thinsulate to keep you warm in most weather, how much probably depends on how easily your feet get cold. I have some that are 1000 grams, they work well. When it's warm I wear more of a normal lace up boot for evening hunts.

Tree stands- I have all three types. I like to hunt out of a nice hanger the best, but they're the biggest pain to setup. I tend to put those where I think they'll stay for a while. The ladders are fairly comfortable & easy to move as long as you can drive fairly close to them or aren't moving them very far, you can set them against almost any tree. Personally I think ladders are better gun stands. They work fine for bowhunting, if you find a spot with a fair amount of underbrush or a clump of basswoods where you can tuck it in with a half dozen trunks or more. Deer will notice the ladder itself if they get too close & it's not hidden & they'll follow the rungs right up to you & then the gig's up. I would agree with Harvey who said the climber is very adaptable for most situations & is also quite fast to put up. Popples, pines, ash trees, a lot of red oaks, & even some maples all can work well for climbers. If I had the money right now I would be buying an aluminum climber with the straps around the back. Not sure of the brand, but in that $250-350 range. I have a Gator Jaws, which works well & was very cheap, but it's heavy & it isn't very quiet to setup. If you move it a lot you get pretty wore out.

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MUCK BOOTS are in my opinion the best option out there. I've had a pair for 3 years now, hard hunting, they are water proof, easy to put on and take off, no laces, and can be worn at all temps you hunt in. Also good support. I use them for bow hunting as well as duck and pheasant, you can walk for miles and never have sore feet.

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