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USPENAMC

what dog would be right for me?

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USPENAMC

Good morning,

My father, Cousin and I are interested in all pitching in to buy a dog but I would like to be more informed on what you guys think would be a nice dog for me.

1) Get along with kids

2) can hunt and do the following things

A)Be a good pheaseant dog

B)retrieve downed ducks/geese

c)Retrieve doves

i will look into the breed of dogs in your responses thank you.

david

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gspman

A lab or a spaniel.

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gonefishin11

I have a lab that does all of those things

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fishwithteeth

Lab smile.gif

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Harmonica Bear

Tha criteria spells L-A-B all the way.

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bhs91

If you hunt more upland that waterfowl, I would go with a Springer. However if it is to be more a water dog, go with a lab. I have both breeds and know that my springer is the better pheasant dog but my lab takes the cake in the water. I have 4 kids and both are awesome around all our kids (ages 2-13).

Good luck,

BHS

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Farmboy1

Looking at where you are from, Labs are big,a nd Eden Prarie may not have enough room to roam for a big dog. If you do choose to get a lab, please verify the breeder. There are some very good breeders, but also a ton of "my brother has a dog that got in with this other dog" types. This is why hip displasia is so prevelant in the breed, poor breeders. Do you homework and you will be OK.

And don't take anyones advise that one dog is better for you then another. I love my Viszla, but they are not for everybody. Do a few internet searches, find out about breed qualities, and find what works best for YOU.

Good luck, having and training a dog is a very rewarding experience. grin.gifgrin.gif

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gundoglily

Another good option would be a field bred English Cocker. It is in the spaniel family, but quite a bit smaller.

The 2 we have weigh in about 35 and 25 lbs.

They have all the desire and drive that a lab does without the size.

They are people pleasing dogs and are good with kids.

They can more easily live in the home than some of the bigger dogs. This is only based on size!!!We have labs in the house too!!

As the previous poster stated, what ever dog you decide on, do your research to get the best suited dog for your family and situation.

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MinnesotaMongo

Here's another thought - when you narrow down your search, one of the deciding factors might be training. I picked my Springer from a particular breeder, because I was able to train with their group. If I am going to spend all this money on a dog, I want to be able to give it the best training possible.

Just a thought....

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Kallista

LAB

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uplander

I still stand by the fact that every sportsmen needs 2 dogs!! 1 flusher 1 pointer or more, but 2 for sure. 2 dogs are better than 1 they can keep each other company when you're at that evil place called , what's it called again......oh yeah ....WORK

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cw642

The fact that you put Pheasants first screams pointing breed, but then the two retrieving requirements say to me you might want a more of a retriever than a pointer. If you do a lot more upland hunting with a weekend or two duck hunting I would say a good choice would be a Pointing breed. I don't think if you want a pheasant dog first, and retriever second I wouldn't even look at a lab. There are so many better choices if you look around. Try researching some of the more versatile breeds and find one you all will enjoy. As the local waterfall population decreases and pheasant and grouse numbers go up you might get a better bang for the buck with a well trained pointing breed. I never regret buying my first pointer, Just my $.02.

CW

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LABS4ME

Quote:

I don't think if you want a pheasant dog first, and retriever second I wouldn't even look at a lab.


You wouldn't even look at a lab?

Guess I'll have to take my Labs out and hope I find a pheasant or two... maybe I'll get lucky and they'll drop dead center in a pond so they can find them.

Many guys pick a lab 1st for pheasants and many of those guys don't even duck hunt. I know two pheasant guides in SoDak who wouldn't even think about owning a pointer as they feel many of the late season birds give the pointers fits. I find it fairly ironic that they won't even consider a pointer. Pointers are the 'specialists' when it comes to upland hunting, but in no way can you say a lab shouldn't be considered.

All dogs have their pros and cons... and all dogs have their followers. But blanket statements like the one made above will help no one in the end make a decision. That would be equivalent to me saying "if you want a dog that goes in the water and that'll make retrieves, I wouldn't even consider a pointer"... but I wouldn't say it, as it makes no sense. I knew an English Pointer that was a retriveing machine, she went in the water many times to get a downed rooster. I hunted over a wirehair once that did an awesome job on waterfowl (mostly geese in the field) and I owned a shorthair that did a great job on ducks for the 1st week or two. With that said my labs have found equally as many pheasants as any of those dogs did.

You are correct when you say if you primarily hunt upland game, you may want to consider a pointer. They are stylish and are very effective and thorough hunters. They can be a little more difficult to train, especially for first time gun dog owners such as USP, but if you work hard enough, and stick to a training regimen, you can have a real nice working dog. If you want to mix in waterfowl hunting and have your sights set on a pointer, look into one of the versatile breeds. If you're looking at grouse hunting primarily, look into Setters and Brittanys. That is where these pointers really earn their wings... in the grouse coverts.

Now with all that said, I think you would do well with a Lab or Golden, Springer or English Cocker or a Wirehair or Griffon. 2 breeds from each category that can handle all the game you are listing as wanting to pursue.

Good Luck!

Ken

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Greybeard53

Lots of great choices already mentioned, but I'll cast my vote for a golden retriever. First off, they are AWESOME family/companion dogs that love kids. Next, they're very versatile hunters, for any upland and waterfowl.

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kgpcr4

I have a pointing lab and have the best of both worlds! cant do everything as well as a pointer but when the roosters are in the cattails my lab will run circles around the pointers. also they cant do any real water work when its cold and i have yet to see many pointers that can find the cripples as well as a lab

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springerspeed

All I have to say is WOW confused.gif! These are some pretty bold statements.

This question is a loaded question my friend. Only you know what dog is right for you grasshopper grin.gif.

Your best option is to do some research on the different breeds and find the ones that suite your hunting style. Then go to places like a hunting preserve and ask what they have for guide dogs and take them out and hunt behind them to see if you like them or not. Kind of like test driving a car before you buy it.

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gspman

kgpcr4,

Quote:

when the roosters are in the cattails my lab will run circles around the pointers


This comment comes up every year and I've always found it very dubious. Any dog can hunt cattails. Please explain your position.

gspman

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LABS4ME

I agree! I have yet to see a dog that has not been able to hunt in the cattails...

A lot of stereotyping of breeds going on. How exposed to all these breeds (other than their own) are the ones that are making the generalzations?

Good Luck!

Ken

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SportFishin'

Although your criteria spells out a "Lab" it also spells out "Wirehaired Pointing Griffon" check them out this maybe another option for your research. Very good with kids,great duck dog, plus you get a pionter all wrapped in one package.

Good Luck with your search!

Chris

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SportFishin'

kgpcr4

Quote:

Also they cant do any real water work when its cold and I have yet to see many pointers that can find the cripples as well as a lab


You obviously haven't seen a trained NAVHDA UT dog my friend? I'd run my WPG pointer out of the blind any day no matter what the weather & after every cripple.

Best regards,

Chris

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MinnesotaMongo

DON'T get a Schnoodle.

We can all agree on that....

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SportFishin'

Amen to that brother!

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FrankGWP

First off: make sure that you check out a number of dogs. Some of the statements on this board are WAY over the top. I erased my reaction to the opinion on pointing labs being equal to versatile breeds. Lets just say I find it to be uninformed. [i am not saying that PLs are bad dogs.]

IMO: You will be doing your self a disservice if you do not check out the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon (WPG) and the German Wirehaired Pointer (GWP). I am not saying that you still may not choose to go with the more familiar lab or springer, but you will be making a decision that lasts 10 to 15 years. Why not gather as much information as possible?

Wires are are excellent rooster dogs, very good waterfoul dogs and great in the home. Stereotypically, the WPG has a more family friendly reputation while the GWP is generally considered more of a sure thing in the field.

A well bred Wire will accept as much training as you choose to provide, but will hunt with very little training. Just like a Lab, etc., all a versatile dog needs is introduction to birds and they will hunt them up. However, extra training is not work. It's fun. Do not let it scare you off!

Echoing the earlier concerns about finding a good litter, it is not often that a wirehair breeder will sell dogs to a non-hunting home. It does happen, but rarely. Further, often versatile dogs have been rigorously tested in a fashion that reflects real world hunting conditions. On the other hand, other breeds are quite popular with non-hunting homes and are regularly breed without hunting in mind. Accordingly, one is more likely to find a wire breed for the field and the home - not just because the breeder can get rid of the puppies.

Finally, two points of advice.

(1) Go online and order "How Gun Dogs Train Themselves" by Joan Bailey.

(2) Remember that you do not buy a dog you buy its grandparents. Here are some rules of thumb in accordance with this principle. Become familiar with pedigrees. Do not purchase a dog from someone not familiar with the parents of the Sire and Dam. If possible hunt over one or both of the parents.

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Harmonica Bear

Good advice.

Quote:

1) Go online and order "How Gun Dogs Train Themselves" by Joan Bailey.


Great book, I highly recommend it as well.

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LABS4ME

Good sound advice FrankGWP. Great informative post.

Good Luck!

Ken

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