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JoeTC

How much thinsulate

9 posts in this topic

Is 1200 grams of thinsulate in rubber boots good enough for cold weather? I have a pair of 400 and they just don't cut it. I'm looking for something about as warm as my winter boots but those aren't thinsulate so I can't compare them.

Thanks

Joe

Thanks

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They will be a little better but remember that your feet will sweat in rubber boots which is what makes your feet cold. Only wear good moisture wicking socks. NO COTTON! For really cold weather I have found nothing better than boots with a thick removable liner. Although I'm told that military "bunny boots" are really warm and I don't think they have a removable liner.

Nels

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One important key to warmth is that the boots fit loosely and are not tied tight. This allows good blood circulation which helps keep feet warm. You'll get cold feet even in the best, most insulated boots if your feet are tightly restricted and the boots tied tight.

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I have a pair of the 1200 gram boots and they are not as warm as a good pair of winter boots. There may be 1200 grams of insulation around the foot but there is not enough insulation below the foot to keep you warm on ice or even a cold day on a deer stand.

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It all depends on what you define as cold weather. Many bow hunters don't hunt after the rifle season cause its too cold. I hunted Dec. 29th last year. I've been out bowhunting in -10*F. I had 2000gram boots for that kind of cold and still used heat packs.

Another factor is whether you are a normally "warm" or "cold" person.

I am a warm bodied person. I get sweaty feet easily and don't like it. I use an 800gram boot for everything but below zero temps and I am fine as long as I layer the proper socks. I also like a lighter boot cause I do a lot of hiking.

I would say for the average person, a 1200gram boot will work in cold weather with the right socks, down to 10-15*F. I think socks are the most important part. Your feet are gonna sweat no matter what. If you use a good wicking sock of polypropylene or similar and layer another sock or two over it then you will be plenty warm.

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It all depends what you define as 'cold weather' and how you handle cold weather. From 35 to 25 degrees, I'll wear my 1000 gram boots. Below 25 degrees I goto my Lacrosse Ice Kings. Below 5 degrees I go with the Ice Kings with chemical handwarmers in them. Keep your feet, head, and hands warm and you'll stay on stand a lot longer!!

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I have pretty warm feet in general so I think 1200 will work. In the past I've worn my Lacross Iceman boots but I'd like to have a pair just for bowhunting. Thanks for all the input.

Joe

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I frost bit my feet when I was 8 years old. I get cold feet in my house. I use 1200 gram Thinsulate, but it all comes down to the Socks. Bad socks = cold feet. This is weird, but also get a good stocking hat and your feet will be warmer. Don't know why, but that is how it works.

Another great trick is have your wife sew little pouches in the inside back of your jacket/favorite sweatshirt (where your kidneys are). Toss a HEAT package in there and you will stay much warmer.

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I had good luck last year with 1,000 gram rubber boots and using the little heat packs. (standing in a deer stand)

Remember those heat packs need air. If you wear lace up boots and tie them tight they won't get warm. That's why I like the rubber boots with toe warmer heat packs.

If I'm walking, then almost any lace up works for me, but I sure like my 1,000 gram redwing's. (Then the packs just bunch up in the toes, so I skip that part when walking.)

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