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Eric Wettschreck

Transom saver

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Eric Wettschreck

I'm building a transom saver for my boat motor and trailer. Does the motor rest completely on the transom saver? Or, should the motor still rest on the "Built in motor rest thingys bar thingys" with the transom saver just there for insurance?

I'm guessing the motor should be resting completely on the transom saver, but I'm not for sure.

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NAGORSKI

Mine rests on the transom saver. I bring down the motor until it rests on the saver, then I "tap" the trim a little to get it snug.

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Shack

Mine rested on the transom saver that connected to bottom roller on trailer.

The one I bought rested on bottom roller and top Y bungied to transom. The bad thing was, the first time I launched with new transom saver I forgot it was on. Removed rear ratchet hold down straps, launched boat, parked truck and trailer, started out on Buffalo lake, felt a hes. on the first full throttle push, fished for a couple of hours and remembered when I returned to dock. Lucky, nothing happened to lower unit or prop. I lost transom saver in lake.

Good luck!

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blueroof

Pretty divided camps regarding transom savers these days.

I personally wouldn't suggest snugging your motor to a trailer mounted transom saver. If your boat and motor aren't completely fixed when traveling your saver will push up on the shaft, causing undue stress on your hydraulics and transom. I know this is contrary to lots of info out there, but IMO many trailer mounted transom savers likely cause more harm than good.

I would suggest using a MyWedge or something similar, or if you motor has a built in saver such as the Etecs, use that.

LB

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Valv

I'd like to now how can it push up on the shaft. Only issue you could have it to get loose since boat bounces on railer, but it bounces upward, not downward, it cannot go any lower than the bunks or rollers. Strap the boat down and you'll solve problem. Anyway I have excellent transom replacements if you have any issue...

I strongly encourage the use of the saver, I receive many boats and I can see where there has been problems, trust me it is a very useful tool.

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cold one sd

I think my dentist has the right idea. He uses a 2x8" board and lowers his outboard against it. I'm not that advanced yet and still use a transom saver that mounts to the trailer. And I let this guy use rotary tools in my mouth. shocked.gifwink.gif

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blueroof

I wouldn't suggest not using a saver, I was just pointing out that trailer linked savers can cause problems, especially when folks put downward pressure on them by snugging the motor down (too much.) Tightening a boat to a trailer is important, however, regardless of how tight you get it, it will always flex and compress some (both ways.) The MyWedge is cheap, durable and transmits far more of the motors mass directly to the trailer. Connections from the keel to the trailer do little in way of helping the transom support the mass of the motor in transit, all it can accomplish is keeping the motor rigid with the trailer and not bob and rotate. Keeping the motor from rotating is a big part of the protection game, translating large downward forces from the motor to the trailer in a sound way during transit is also important.

In the worst case scenario you hit a big bump blush.gif at 75mph, your snugged down motor is pushed slightly up by the keel connected saver just as the motorhead's center of mass is about to be slammed down onto your transom. Lots of repairs out there for sure.

LB

Quote:

I'd like to now how can it push up on the shaft. Only issue you could have it to get loose since boat bounces on railer, but it bounces upward, not downward, it cannot go any lower than the bunks or rollers.


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ChuckN

I am a believer in the transom saver. My old 14' and 12' boat shows proof how much stress goes on the transom from a little motor, and how traveling down the road adds a lot of stress to the transom. The transoms are cracked and bent, but with the saver you can see the stress is greatly reduced when the motor is supported. I've seen a larger boat's transom crack too because of stress.

The transom saver I have has a rubber shock absorber built inside and eliminates all the shock onto the transom, motor and trailer.

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mamohr686

On one of my first used boat purchases the previous owner didn't use a transom saver. He only towed short distances so he didn't think he needed one. About 6 months after I bought it the entire power trim and tilt assembly needed to be replaced and also there were some stress cracks in the transom area of the procraft fiberglass boat. That was several years ago and the total bill was over $900 (now with the jump in shop labor it would be closer to $1200), for a new Power trim and tilt assembly for a 150hp merc XR6 outboard. I could've tried to go the cheap route and had it rebuilt, but it was really worn out. A $40 transom saver is money in the bank as far as I'm concerned. Just watch for wear on the rubber part that snugs up to the lower unit. If they get worn the rivets can dammage the outboard, so it's a good idea to replace them every 5 years or so.

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cold one sd

I have seen an ad for a transom saver that plugged into the drain hole in a boat. Anyone else seen this one? It was several years ago when I saw it.

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Shack

No! But everything is sturdy, it sounds like a good idea!

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Mid-Lake Rock

Quote:

I have seen an ad for a transom saver that plugged into the drain hole in a boat. Anyone else seen this one? It was several years ago when I saw it.


If anyone sees this product please post a link or PM me. This sounds like the ticket. My trailer is not a bunk and getting a transom saver attached to the trailer is a chore. I've been using the M-YWedge and so far so good.

It seems like this discussion comes up all the time. Maybe the memebers of this board should organize an outing. All the FM engineers get together and develop some experiments to test the force created from a trailer to the transom using a saver and the force on a transom using the Wedge or some wood. I'm not an engineer, but I'll sweep the floor or something. laugh.gif

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Eric Wettschreck

I did a small test last night. I set up a dial indicator between the keel of my boat, and the trailer. Then, I had a kid watch the needle. I hopped in the boat and jumped up and down. I hopped out and pushed and pulled and bounced everything I could. This is with the rear of the boat firmly strapped down.

From my results, I don't see a problem as long as the boat is firmly strapped down. I realize all trailers and boats are not created equal, but I custom built my transom saver for my boat and trailer. Not for mass production.Heck, if all else fails I'll buy a transom from Valv. grin.gif

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JDM

I use a 2 x 4. I tilt the motor down so that it holds it. Is this sufficient? The boat dealer suggested this.

Obviuosly, I don't want to harm anything. Does the piece of wood do the same thing? In my mind it does, but I am not an expert.

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fivebucks

The 2x4 to the motor does not help the transom imo. Where the motor attaches to the transom can still be stressed by going down the road. It may take many years to do any harm but why take the chance. Using a transom saver that ties into the trailer keeps the weight and pressure of the motor off of the transom. I will always use a transom saver. At $35 or so it is cheap insurance.

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blueroof

Not to jump back into this, but the Trailer to keel transom savers do not support the weight of the motor or offset the motors downward force on the transom to any significant degree. It's not possible with the center of mass of the engine head up so high and transmitted through two lever arms as it is.

LB

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cold one sd

Quote:

I wouldn't suggest not using a saver, I was just pointing out that trailer linked savers can cause problems, especially when folks put downward pressure on them by snugging the motor down (too much.) Tightening a boat to a trailer is important, however, regardless of how tight you get it, it will always flex and compress some (both ways.) The MyWedge is cheap, durable and transmits far more of the motors mass directly to the trailer. Connections from the keel to the trailer do little in way of helping the transom support the mass of the motor in transit, all it can accomplish is keeping the motor rigid with the trailer and not bob and rotate. Keeping the motor from rotating is a big part of the protection game, translating large downward forces from the motor to the trailer in a sound way during transit is also important.

In the worst case scenario you hit a big bump
blush.gif
at 75mph, your snugged down motor is pushed slightly up by the keel connected saver just as the motorhead's center of mass is about to be slammed down onto your transom. Lots of repairs out there for sure.

LB

Quote:

I'd like to now how can it push up on the shaft. Only issue you could have it to get loose since boat bounces on railer, but it bounces upward, not downward, it cannot go any lower than the bunks or rollers.



Do you use the centering clips to keep your motor from rotating while trailering???

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Kyle Sandberg

Ok, I'm a little confused. What exactly does a transom saver do? When I drive down the road my motor dosen't turn or bounce around. Would you recomend I get/build one?

Thanks

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blueroof

Quote:

Do you use the centering clips to keep your motor from rotating while trailering???


I've been using a bungee cord lashed around the steering wheel and seat post. The clips look like a good product.

LB

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cold one sd

K Dawg, My bigger boat is an 1800 Fisherman with a 150 hp outboard on it. I trailer with my outboard tilted up some to keep it away from the surface of the road. Otherwise it would drag while going down the road. A transom saver goes between my lower unit above the gear case and the rear crossmember of my trailer. It keeps the outboard from acting as a lever on the transom of my boat while I'm traveling because it holds it steady. All it does is keep the lower unit from bouncing up and down causing stress to my transom while traveling. On my 14 foot boat I don't use one because it only has a 15 hp motor and it is straight up and down when I travel. What size is your outboard?

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cold one sd

I have a 150 Verado with hydraulic steering and I don't think it would move either way, but I use centering clips anyway. It is rock solid on the road.

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blueroof

Quote:

What exactly does a transom saver do? When I drive down the road my motor doesn't turn or bounce around. Would you recomend I get/build one?


The primary reason to use a transom saver is to prevent your engine from pivoting about the fixed hookup points on the transom. On bigger engines with hydraulics, this point is pretty much fixed. The weight of the shaft when trailering can cause the motor to flex, heave and ho quite a bit when hitting bumps.

The standard option is hooking a linkage between your motors shaft and the trailer, possibly another part of the boat. Another option is it use a block of wood or something to push between the trim/tilt ram pistons and the ram contact cavity on the motor. I believe the new Evinrudes come with a transom saver built in. I have seen folks use both types together.

I prefer using a linkage in the trim/tilt cavity bacause it directly supports some of the outboards mass (you can draw a line directly from the trailer to a good portion of the engine's mass.) Any mass that is supported here, isn't weighing down the fixed points your trying to protect. No system is perfect.

LB

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Kyle Sandberg

Quote:

What size is your outboard?


Just a 90 on a 17 footer. Thanks for the responses. I think thats something I'll have to work on over the winter.

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cold one sd

I was looking at one on the web yesterday that has a "T" on one end and it seems to have spring loaded pins in it that snap into the motor mount in a couple of the holes where the trim pin goes and the other end went to the lower unit. It looked like it would at least transfer the shock to the lower part of the engine clamp that is bolted through the transom. Lots of options and like you say, you have all winter. It is called Swivel-eze Lock'n Stow. I would post the link here, but I would probably get busted. You can google it. Good luck.

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