Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

  • Announcements

    • Rick

      Members Only Fluid Forum View   08/08/2017

      Fluid forum view allows members only to get right to the meat of this community; the topics. You can toggle between your preferred forum view just below to the left on the main forum entrance. You will see three icons. Try them out and see what you prefer.   Fluid view allows you, if you are a signed up member, to see the newest topic posts in either all forums (select none or all) or in just your favorite forums (select the ones you want to see when you come to Fishing Minnesota). It keeps and in real time with respect to Topic posts and lets YOU SELECT YOUR FAVORITE FORUMS. It can make things fun and easy. This is especially true for less experienced visitors raised on social media. If you, as a members want more specific topics, you can even select a single forum to view. Let us take a look at fluid view in action. We will then break it down and explain how it works in more detail.   The video shows the topic list and the forum filter box. As you can see, it is easy to change the topic list by changing the selected forums. This view replaces the traditional list of categories and forums.   Of course, members only can change the view to better suit your way of browsing.   You will notice a “grid” option. We have moved the grid forum theme setting into the main forum settings. This makes it an option for members only to choose. This screenshot also shows the removal of the forum breadcrumb in fluid view mode. Fluid view remembers your last forum selection so you don’t lose your place when you go back to the listing. The benefit of this feature is easy to see. It removes a potential barrier of entry for members only. It puts the spotlight on topics themselves, and not the hierarchical forum structure. You as a member will enjoy viewing many forums at once and switching between them without leaving the page. We hope that fluid view, the new functionality is an asset that you enjoy .
Sign in to follow this  
palisade1kid

Why do you hunt?

Recommended Posts

palisade1kid    0
palisade1kid

This came up at another site with the anti's chiming in.

I thought to start a thread here...

Here's a few things I'm thinking about why I hunt?

1st off being in the outdoors,clean air,great exercise.

The beauty of mother nature is second to none.

Some of the experiences of seeing so many species of animals in their habitat is awesome and sometimes mesmerising.

Watching the sunrises and sunsets is like being in an art gallery.So beautiful and peacefull.The tranquility I get after being neck deep in the hustle & bussle of our society is a great way to shed it all.

2ndly For generations my family has hunted.

With our busy lives to join together for the hunt allows us to relink to each other.To catch up on births/deaths of friends and family.To share the past years ups and downs.

To reminisce of years hunts gone by.To joke,laugh and sometimes cry.

It's a time to teach the young ones the ways of the wilderness and support the old ones reaffirming their rightful place in the great outdoor.

3rd Our family supplements our food source with clean low fat foods.

When you figure in many meals of venison,waterfowl,grouse,fish the food $$$$ going to the stores stays in our pockets which can then go to bettering our lives with other products we can not make.

4th The HUNT is forever an adrenaline boost.No drug can make me feel like I do when those flocks of geese or ducks that I've called and so painstakingly laid my decoy spread to entice them close enough set their wings for that final approach.

Watching that deer walk in after my rattle/grunt sequence has been preformed with the scents in the proper areas.

The satisfaction of seeing that all of my pre-scouting has now paid off.

Finally the kill has been made.

Now comes the tracking and retrieval of my game.

At days end my freezer is full and I'm content to know I'll be eating some very fine food that I worked for.

Nothing that comes is easy worth very much & after the work involved seeing my efforts repaid with some awesome food makes me very happy that I did it on my own.Being self sufficient ,not having to rely on others to put food on my table carries it's own level of satisfaction.

I am a predator,a conservationist,an ecologist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BobT    104
BobT

#1 It's another source of food for my family. Why do they buy beef, chicken, pork, lamb, fish, potatoes, onions, tomatoes, carrots, beans, peas, etc?

#2 It's in my nature. I have been ordained to subdue the planet and all creatures are suitable for food, not just those that we put in a corral.

#3 I enjoy being outdoors, one with nature.

#4 I enjoy wildlife. No, I do not kill everything that moves when I'm out there. I probably see more wildlife in a given day than they do in a week.

#5 Because of hunting seasons, we gather together at the same time to pursue our passion. With that said, I enjoy the camaraderie.

#6 I enjoy the chase.

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
troutmaster    0
troutmaster

to put meat on the table.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Big Pine Walleye    0
Big Pine Walleye

I like the time that I am able to spend with my sons--whether it be at the local sport shop, building deer stands, clearing trails, and of course actually hunting together. It has become a year around activity that we all enjoy!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
harvey lee    13
harvey lee

The challenge of the hunt, the open area and fresh air. One cannot forget about the friendships made over the years.

Tradition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shack    16
Shack

I hunt, there for I am!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jameson    3
Jameson

Because overabundant starving deer is a terrible sight.

It is food.

Most of the roosters aren't going to live that long anyways.

Because doves poop on my truck.

It's good for the economy.

Their is so many rabbits in my woods they are chewing all the bark off the trees!

Got anything better to do?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
so haaad    0
so haaad

Last Sunday a watched a tiny little red squirrel chase a giant fox squirrel around a tree for five minutes straight. I had to chuckle watching the smaller squirrel prove that size doesn't always matter. smile.gif Then both squirrels suddenly froze in their tracks, and I noticed that a very young coyote had snuck in to about 15 yards of me. Like a young child, he tripped and fell off of a log. Next he rummaged through the leaves like a pig, followed by a second attempt to climb up on the log. When he finally reached the highest point of the log, he posed there for all the world to see. It reminded me of when I was young, being back in elementary school playing "king of the snow hill". It was a great night out in the woods even though I didn't see a single deer. You ask why do I hunt? Because when I'm in the woods, life at that moment slows down. Life becomes simple again. I start seeing the little things again. And all is well in the world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hitman54    3
Hitman54

As I get older, I know now more than ever why I hunt. I hunt for the same reasons my Dad and Grandfather took me hunting when I was a kid. I understand the addage of "putting meat on the table". That is just part of it for me. I could save a hole lot of money if I just went to the store and bought meat instead of hunting and fishing for it. When you figure all the gadgets, gizmoes and upgrades the average hunter and fisherman makes the cost of that deer or walleye are more expensive than prime rib or Alaskan salmon! I hunt because it is a wonderful thing to share with my family. I got my wife into deer hunting about four years ago. I truely believe that I was more excited than her when she shot her first deer. It was at that moment that I realized how my dad felt when I shot my first deer so many years ago. I now have four kids who I also am teaching to hunt. My oldest will get to deer hunt with me this year. I know that I am more excited for him and the expierence than he is for himself! I can't wait for Nov.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bluegill1510    0
Bluegill1510

Same reasons as you CK, and basically everyone else. I do it to get away from people and be in nature and see how animals act and respond to scents and sounds you create to attract them. Plus I enjoy the whole process of deer hunting...scouting, putting up a stand or stalking and then putting in the time to get a nice deer, then retrieving it, field dressing it, skin it and cut it up for the freezer and processing some of it up myself for eating! To me I get more satisfaction doing that than just going to the grocery store and buying meating or food that I dont know where it came from. Plus what else am I suppose to do with my time? Sit and watch Opera and get in touch with my inner feelings? Give me a break, then you wonder why this country is full of anti's.

LoL thats another reason why I hunt so I get away from people that are like that, so I don't have to deal with them on a daily basis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shack    16
Shack

I HUNT, THEREFORE I AM

by

Philip O'Neil

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I once read an anti-hunting article that said there is no place in modern society for hunting. This article like many of its kind portrayed all hunters as heartless, barbaric, bloodthirsty “rednecks”. Just to be accurate, we unfortunately do have those in our fraternity who fit this description and give all of us a bad name…. The good old boys who have no respect for animals, game laws and human decency are in the minority however. The rest of us that number in the millions in North America alone must then be somehow genetically flawed, misinformed, misguided and brainless (Contact Us Please) incapable of making informed decisions and following our natural instincts. How else could we explain our passion for hunting….Hmm!

Modern society is in such good shape that we should know better than to live a decent life that is closely and inexorably linked to nature, a life that gives us a deep appreciation for its beauty, and the real threats to life’s balance. Educated humans after all do such a wonderful job of looking after humans that animals should be afforded the same treatment…..there is no poverty, suffering, hatred and slaughtering of innocent humans is there? Sadly “modern” society is only more advanced in terms of technology, stressing us at a faster pace and developing every inch of earth into shopping malls. But does that equate to real progress for humans, ecosystems and animals? Oh, I almost forgot…experts living in concrete cities who have never spent real time with nature are the experts in making decisions on how to protect and proliferate wildlife. They instinctively know what is best for mother earth because the lost souls need a cause to give their own miserable lives meaning. We should listen to their propaganda and change our lifestyle to suit “modern standards”. If we lay down our guns and bows and stop paying attention to wildlife then maybe it will go away. I take solace and comfort in nature….people scare me.

Life is sometimes merely a game of numbers. The greater the majority the greater the chance you have of winning. Surely if you read in a newspaper that 80% of people surveyed believed that Saddam Hussein has no chemical/biological weapons then that must be true…right? Anti’s love to play the numbers game. They argue that most people never hunt and have no interest in killing animals….they just want to eat them off of Styrofoam! How is it that not everyone has the same instinct to hunt? That is a fair question. If, for example, 80% of the population has no interest in hunting then the rest of us must be fundamentally flawed. Have we not evolved at the same pace as the rest of humanity or is it that only 20% of the population has evolved despite the trappings of modern society? Who decided that all facets of modern life are improved and reflect the best direction for humans?

I was born a hunter. It was not a family thing, as my father did not hunt. He did fish and had a great love of the outdoors and that no doubt that had a positive impact on me. The awakening of these instincts in me happened at a very young age…..it was not a choice so much as a part of me. Hunting is not a sport, rather a way of life, a lifestyle and a way of being. I think and worry about wildlife all of the time, not just when it is convenient or I need a cause to hang my hat on to make me feel worthwhile. I am so glad that I have had the opportunity to hunt and develop an intimate knowledge of what really happens in nature’s daily struggle.

The ultimate survival of wildlife, habitat and common sense will rest with us it seems. We will have to be the stewards of the land and continue to follow our instincts. It is up to us to help create, or perhaps restore, the natural balance between humans and critters. We all have moments of doubt about what we do as hunters because there is so much complexity in the world around us. That is a normal human emotion but if we can get back to what is natural and instinctual both humans and animals will be the better for it.

Now that what I am talking about.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bluegill1510    0
Bluegill1510

Thanks for posting that Shackbash, Paul O'neil took the words right out of my mouth. Thats what I'm talking about as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palisade1kid    0
palisade1kid

Way to go SB!

Great read!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jigging-matt    0
jigging-matt

1. Because I love being outdoors.

2. There is nothing better than sitting in your stand and hearing the woods come to life as the sun comes up.

3. There is nothing like watching the dogs work the birds.

4. The camaraderie.

grin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Donk    0
The Donk

Wow. I wanted to get up and give a standing ovation after I read that.... Wow...chills ooo.gif

I hunt because its the only time I feel I can be true to myself, and feel as though I am part of a much bigger picture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bluebill    0
bluebill

about 10 years ago we talked about this in the duck blind on the last day of the season my buddy put it best "if you have to explain it to them they would never understand"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
analyzer    2
analyzer

I think I hunt, for the same reason I go to the BWCA every year. For those few days, I don't answer a cell phone, I don't have email, I don't sit in rush hour, I don't hear traffic, I don't sweat the mortgage, I don't worry about my childrens college fund, I don't have a honey-do list...

It is only about that moment. To sit there, and focus solely and intently on the crack of a stick, and trying to determine if the sound of those leaves, are that of a squirrel or a buck. You can hear and feel your own heart beat, as you watch those white tines, slowly creep through the brush... it is so intense.

And even if you don't see a single deer...

I love the smell of dirt.

I love the smell of wet musty leaves.

I love the smell of doe estrus.

I love watching a pheasant rooster, make his way across the cut corn field, wondering where the hell he was two weeks ago when I was Pheasant hunting.

I love going to my favorite woods, weeks before the hunt, merely to walk around and look for scrapes, and rubs, and poop... and it doesn't really matter if I'm successful, just being in the woods is so refreshing.

I like to look for sheds, at first snow melt, just so I can get excited 6 months early.

My father never took me hunting. I only got into it recently because my son wanted to learn.

Thank god, because now I'm hooked, and when all the pressures of this world build up, and some times I think about giving up, about quiting life...

it gives me one more reason to hang in there...

Cuz next month, is deer opener...

and I can't wait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palisade1kid    0
palisade1kid

This was an interesting read from the MN DNR.....

Dispelling some myths about hunting

By Tom Dickson, DNR information officer

Note: This article may be reprinted in newspapers, newsletters, and other publications.

If you don't hunt, you might wonder what's so appealing about this activity. Why, for example, would anyone sit for hours in a chilly duck blind? Or trudge mile after mile through soggy cattail sloughs? And what's the thrill in trying to kill an animal, anyway? If hunters want to be outdoors and see animals, can't they just watch wildlife without shooting them?

Hunting, with a half-million Minnesota participants, must certainly stir the curiosity of those who don't take part.

Why someone hunts is a personal matter. Many do it to spend time outdoors with friends or family. Others hunt to continue a tradition passed down from their parents and grandparents. Some go for the satisfaction of providing their own meat or the challenge of outwitting a wild animal. Many hunt simply because they feel an urge to do so. As environmentalist and hunter Aldo Leopold put it, "the instinct that finds delight in the sight and pursuit of game is bred into the very fiber of the race."

It's hard to generalize what hunters are doing when they go afield each fall. But it is possible to explain what hunters are not doing, and to shed light on some aspects of hunting that might puzzle those who don't participate. Hunters aren't killing animals needlessly.

People who say there's no need to kill animals for meat when it can be bought in a grocery store don't understand how food happens: Whether someone eats venison or beef, a big brown-eyed mammal has to die first. The animal doesn't care whether you pay someone else to kill it or you do it yourself.

Of course, vegetarians don't kill animals. Or do they? Most vegetable production is done at the expense of wild creatures, either by converting wildlife habitat to cropland or requiring the application of chemical pesticides and fertilizers. Soybeans and corn, for example, are often grown on wetlands that have been drained and plowed. Without a place to nest, a hen mallard doesn't die, but she doesn't raise any young, either.

1. Hunters aren't being cruel to wild animals.

Most wild animals don't pass away in comfort, sedated by veterinary medication. They usually die a violent, agonizing death. Though a hunter's bullet or arrow can cause a wild animal pain and trauma, such a death is no worse than the other ways wildlife perish. A deer not shot eventually will be killed by a car, predator, exposure, or starvation. An old, weakened pheasant doesn't die in its sleep. It gets caught by a hawk and eaten.

Of course, hunters don't do individual wild animals any favors by killing them, but they also don't do anything unnaturally cruel.

2. Hunters aren't dangerous, inept, or trigger-happy.

Hunting would seem more prone to accidents and fatalities than outdoor activities that don't use firearms. Not so. According to National Safety Council statistics, far more people per 100,000 participants are injured while bicycling or playing baseball than while hunting. And the Council's most recent statistics show that while roughly 100 people die nationwide in hunting accidents each year, more than 1,500 die in swimming-related incidents.

One reason for hunting's safety record: Most states require young hunters to pass a firearms safety course. In Minnesota alone, 4,000 volunteer instructors give firearms safety training to 20,000 young hunters each year.

Just as they handle their gun cautiously, so do most hunters strive to kill game as cleanly as possible. Hunters practice their marksmanship, study wildlife behavior and biology, and take pains to follow a wounded animal to ensure any suffering ends quickly.

As do all activities, hunting has its share of scofflaws. But most hunters obey the law and act ethically. To nab the wrongdoers among them, hunters created Turn In Poachers, a nonprofit organization that offers rewards for information leading to the arrest of fish and game law violators.

3. Hunters aren't harming wildlife populations.

Hunters see to that out of self-interest. That's why they support state and federal conservation agencies limiting seasons to just a few weeks or months a year, limiting the number of animals they kill, and placing restrictions on killing females of some species. These regulations help ensure that wildlife populations stay healthy. They also make the pursuit of game more difficult, requiring hunters to use their wits, patience, and hunting skills.

4. Hunters aren't using non-hunters? tax dollars.

Hunters pay their own way, and then some. Minnesota hunters fund almost all Department of Natural Resources habitat acquisition and wildlife research with their license fees and a federal excise tax on hunting equipment. In addition, their financial support pays to improve populations of non-game wildlife. Wetland destruction has wiped out the habitats of many bird species, causing their numbers to decline. Were it not for wetlands bought and improved with state and federal waterfowl stamp revenue and with the contributions of hunting conservation organizations, hunters and others who like to watch wildlife would today see fewer marsh wrens, pied-billed grebes, Forster's terns, and other wetland birds. These are some things that hunters aren't doing.

What I suspect most are doing--if they hunt for the reasons I do--is fulfilling a need to be part of the natural world that observation alone can't satisfy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gspman    0
gspman

Because I enjoy it. It doesn't matter if I get anything or if I have fancy equipment. I just like being out there with my dog. If the dog does okay then I'm happy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MikeYager - Suzuki    0
MikeYager - Suzuki

Instinct.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  



  • Posts

    • Rick
      When archery deer season opens Saturday, Sept. 16, mandatory testing for chronic wasting disease and restrictions on moving deer carcasses begins again in southeastern Minnesota’s CWD management zone, deer permit area 603.  “With archery deer season approaching, hunters are encouraged to plan ahead and be aware of the testing that will be required and the specifics about when they can and can’t move carcasses out of the CWD zone,” said Lou Cornicelli, wildlife research manager for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Archery hunters in deer permit area (DPA) 603 will be required to submit the head from all adult deer 1 year old or older so lymph nodes can be tested for CWD. Hunters cannot remove the carcass or carcass remains from the CWD zone until a negative test result is reported. Carcass movement restrictions do allow hunters to immediately transport out of the zone quarters or other deer pieces without spinal column parts; boned-out meat; and antlers with a skull plate that is free of brain matter. Hunters should check page 65 of the 2017 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations Handbook for additional information. “Archery deer hunters also should check the DNR website for the DPA boundary map,” Cornicelli said. “As a reminder, the CWD management zone was created from DPAs 347 and 348, so hunters need to be mindful of what area they’re hunting.” Hunters are required to register their deer. DNR will allow phone and Internet registration during the archery season in the CWD zone. The system will be monitored for compliance and may be turned off if needed. Mandatory testing and carcass movement restrictions will remain in effect for area 603 throughout deer seasons for archery, firearm, muzzleloader and any late season hunts. Head collection boxes will be located in: Chatfield: Magnum Sports, 1 1st St., 507-867-4399. Preston: DNR area forestry office, 912 Houston St., 507-765-2740. Lanesboro: DNR area fisheries office, 23789 Grosbeak Rd., 507-467-2442. Wykoff: Goodies and Gas, 104 E Front St., 507-352-2421. Harmony: Oak Meadow Meats, 50 9th St., 507-886-6328 Archery hunters should do the following: Field dress (gut) deer as normal. Register deer via phone, internet or walk-in big game registration station. If harvest occurs late in the day, sample (head) submission and registration do not have to occur on the same day. If the deer will be mounted, a video showing how to properly cape your deer is available at bitly.com/capeadeer. Remove the head, leaving at least 4 inches of neck attached. Hunters can take meat out of the zone immediately but the carcass (head with brain and spinal column) cannot be moved outside deer permit area 603 until a negative test result is received so hunters must: Make arrangements to refrigerate the carcass before the deer is processed; Cut deer into quarters or other pieces; or Bone-out the meat. Ensure no spinal column or brain matter is included with the meat or on the antlers. Properly dispose of carcass remains. There will be a dumpster at the DNR forestry office in Preston for hunters who don’t have a way to dispose of remains. The Preston dumpster is being provided as a courtesy for deer carcass disposal only. It will be removed if people attempt to process deer there or use the dumpster for trash disposal. Bring the entire head of deer to one of five head box collection sites. Each collection box has specific instructions on how to properly submit the head for sampling. Put heads in the plastic bags provided. Use the maps provided at each box to mark an “X” where the deer was harvested. Submit this map with sample. Samples during the archery season will be submitted for testing on Mondays and Thursdays. It may take up to four business days for test results to be available.  CWD test results can be searched using a nine-digit MDNR number online at www.mndnr.gov/cwdcheck. Deer hunters should regularly check the DNR’s CWD website at mndnr.gov/cwd for the most recent information. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • delcecchi
      That's ok.   Bass, Pike, Musky more fun anyway. 
    • delcecchi
      I don't know if fishing is better or worse in Minnesota, but you can get a perfectly adequate fishing boat for under 20k,  under 10k if you are ok with used.   For example, a boat like this would totally do everything you want to do... http://hotspotoutdoors.com/forums/topic/181008-2005-lund-explorer-1600-with-merc-60hp-4-stroke-efi-fully-loaded/ I don't know if this is a good price or a good boat, but you get the picture...
    • Rick
      Firearms and muzzleloader hunters who want to harvest antlerless deer in a deer permit area designated as lottery this hunting season are reminded they must purchase their license by Thursday, Sept. 7. Hunters who purchase their license before this date are automatically entered into the lottery for the deer permit area or special hunt area they declare.  This season, antlerless deer permits are issued by lottery in 48 of Minnesota’s 130 deer permit areas. No application is needed to take antlerless deer in permit areas with hunters choice, managed or intensive designations. Hunters who want to participate in special firearm deer hunts also need to apply for permits that are issued through a lottery, and the application deadline is Sept. 7. More information about deer permit areas, how their designations are set and special hunts is available on the deer page and in the 2017 Minnesota Hunting and Trapping Regulations Handbook. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Beginning Friday, Sept. 1, hunters can access 26,700 acres of private land across 46 counties in western and south-central Minnesota through the Walk-In Access program.  “Finding land for hunting can be a challenge,” said Scott Roemhildt, Walk-In Access coordinator for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “Walk-In Access allows hunters to access high-quality private land and makes it easier for landowners to allow that access.” The Walk-In Access program pays landowners to allow hunter access. Hunters with a $3 Walk-In Access validation may hunt during legal hunting hours, during open hunting seasons from Sept. 1 to May 31. No additional landowner contact is necessary. More than 230 sites across 46 counties are available through the program. Bright yellow-green signs have been placed on Walk-In Access boundaries. Hunting seasons open Sept. 1 for mourning doves, crows, snipe, sora and Virginia rails. Hunting seasons open Saturday, Sept. 16, for several small game species including squirrels and rabbits. The Minnesota pheasant hunting season opens Saturday, Oct. 14. Maps of all Walk-In Access sites are available electronically at mndnr.gov/walkin. Printed atlases can be found across the 46-county area at DNR license agents, DNR wildlife offices and county soil and water conservation district offices. Atlases are also available by calling the DNR Information Center at 888-646-6367. “Walk-In Access works because hunters respect the land and that respect encourages landowners to enroll their land,” Roemhildt said. “We are glad to talk with landowners who are considering the program,” Roemhildt said. “We hope to grow the program to 30,000 acres by 2018.” Parcels enrolled in the Walk-In Access program must be at least 40 acres in size with high quality cover. Most land is also enrolled in private land conservation programs. The next enrollment period will begin in January 2018. The Walk-In Access program began in 2011 and is currently funded through 2018 with a three-year grant from the Natural Resources Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Other funding sources come through a surcharge on nonresident hunting licenses, a one-time appropriation from the Minnesota Legislature in 2012, and donations from hunters. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has confirmed the invasive algae starry stonewort in Lake Minnewaska in Pope County. This is the second new confirmation of starry stonewort in a Minnesota lake in 2017.  DNR invasive species specialists confirmed an abundant growth of starry stonewort among native aquatic plants in the narrow Lake Minnewaska marina off the main body of the lake. Additional searches are being conducted to determine whether it is anywhere beyond the marina. Treatment options are being considered. Starry stonewort has never been eradicated from any U.S. lake, but treatment can help ease lake access and water-based recreational activities. There are now 11 lakes in Minnesota where starry stonework has been confirmed. Two were confirmed in 2015, seven in 2016, and two this year. It has been present in at least some of these lakes for several years, rather than being spread to many lakes in a just a year or two. Since the first case was confirmed in 2015, all but one have been reported in the month of August, when the telltale star-shaped bulbils are most abundant and visible. Now is the best time of year to look for it. Information on how to identify starry stonewort can be found on the DNR’s website, and any suspicious plants should be reported to the DNR. Starry stonewort is an alga that can form dense mats, which can interfere with use of a lake and compete with native plants. It is most likely spread when fragments have not been properly cleaned from trailered boats, personal watercraft, docks, boat lifts, anchors or other water-related equipment. This new confirmation reminds boaters and anglers to follow Minnesota laws to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species: Clean aquatic plants and animals from watercraft; Drain all water by removing drain plugs and keep drain plugs out while transporting watercraft; and Dispose of unwanted bait in the trash. Some invasive species are small and difficult to see at the access. To remove or kill them, take one or more of the following precautions before moving to another waterbody, especially after leaving infested waters: Spray with high-pressure water. Rinse with very hot water (120 degrees Fahrenheit for at least two minutes or 140 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 10 seconds). Dry for at least five days. Details about starry stonewort and other aquatic invasive species are available on the aquatic invasive species page. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Wildlife artists can submit entries for the 2018 Minnesota Pheasant Stamp from Tuesday, Sept. 5, to 4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 15.  The pheasant stamp validation for hunting is $7.50 and is required for pheasant hunters ages 18 to 64. For an extra 75 cents, purchasers can receive the validation as well as the pictorial stamp in the mail. It also is sold as a collectible. Revenue from stamp sales is dedicated to pheasant management and habitat work. The ring-necked pheasant must be the primary focus of the design, though other species may be included in the design if they are used to depict common interactions between species or are common inhabitants of Minnesota’s pheasant range. Artists are prohibited from using any photographic product as part of their finished entries. Winning artists may issue limited edition prints of the artwork and retain proceeds. Final judging is open to the public and will take place at 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 21, at DNR headquarters, 500 Lafayette Road in St. Paul. The public is welcome to come and view the winning design 10 a.m. to noon on Friday, Sept. 22. For more information on stamp contests, guidelines for submitting work, and to sign up to receive regular email updates on stamp contests, visit the contest webpage. Contest guidelines also are available from the DNR Information Center by calling 651-296-6157 or 888-646-6367. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • ozzie
      same here for the panfish...find the weed line and slow troll or cast, fall, slow retrieve.
    • guitpic
      I'm 68, retired, moved back to MN 2004 from SDAK. This year I tried to learn to fish MN  again after leaving MN fishing back in 1968. Been fishing in my backyard on the Ottertail river...waters are fast and there are rocks/weeds.  Tried buzzbaits(just a bit) frogs..anything topwater, simulated and live night crawlers.  Get a bite now and then...smallmouth bass. A friend suggested I buy a boat, try some other parts of the Ottertail river and Minnesota lakes/rivers in general. Fishing boats are now $50k plus or minus and I can't figure out if the fishing is any better in MN with a boat than my backyard. Part of my issue is that I experienced hunting and fishing in SD from 1969 - 2004...when I lived there...that's my point of comparison.    
    • BringAnExtension
      I am in the middle of a rebuild as well.  The carpet needed to be replaced, and the best way to do that was to remove things, which turned out to have some rotting boards, which led to more removal and this is how it currently looks:   Most of the wood in my boat merely need a new coat of paint.  However, you can see the framing in the bottom picture are all rotted.  I have actually been thinking of replacing it with some 2x2 cedar.  Hoping that will be better at avoiding rot.  I also need to replace the deck above that frame, it had gotten a little soft and I am going to lay a new piece of treated plywood on top.  Probably the best for replacement would be marine grade plywood, but it is expensive and not convenient for picking up over the weekend.  Of course, I have never done this before so I am not speaking from experience.