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DonBo

Need help with flinching.

7 posts in this topic

Am going on a rifle mule deer hunt in November. Here at home I shoot a .243 with no problems, but have started to shoot my 300 WSM in preperation for this trip. I started flinching bad!

I can dry fire the gun all day long with no problem, even shoot my .22 with no problem, but the big game rifles, even the .243 now I can't hold on the target and punch the trigger bad.

Anyone else have this problem that can give me some advise?

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I had a little problem with that or I just didnt like the kick. I had a muzzle brake put on and it really took the kick out. Only downside to the brake is now the noise is veeeery loud. Your ears will ring if you dont put protection on.

When I go to the range I will use ear plugs or a head set. When hunting since I will only be taking one shot I either put up with the noise or put ear plugs in.

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Since you have don't have the problem when dry firing, it seems as you are anticipating the punch. Flinching can be hard to cure.

Get your self a recoil pad made by PAST. It slips up your arm and goes on your shoulder. It works for both left and right handed shooters.

About a decade ago, I moved up from a 30-06 to a .338. Before I even shot my new gun, I bought the PAST pad. It really takes a lot of the punch out, and it may help you stop flinching.

Once you have fixed your flinching problem, here is a way to test and refine it. Go to the range with a partner. Have him load the rifle for you out of your sight. Instruct that on a random basis, a snap cap be loaded. Once you are on the firing line, you will not know if you are pulling the trigger on a live round, or a dummy. Start this with a .22, then something a little stronger like the .243, and then go bigger once that is successful.

A poorly adjusted trigger can be bad for flinching too. My old Remington 742 was draggy, creepy, and just plain bad. I found myself flinching some, as the trigger would never release the same way twice.

Good luck!

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Thanks for the advice, keep it coming.

A friend also suggested the live / dummy round idea, I definetly will try this. I put a SIM recoil pad on my turkey gun and love it! I may try this also.

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Have you tried a gun rest thingy? They sell them for around a hundred bucks and they take away 90% of the kick. Your rifle sits in a fork in the front like a "Y" and in the back there is a leather strap around the butt. It will make that gun kick a lot less.

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I would totally agree with Gissert on how to cure the problem. Don't expect to cure the problem the first session - it may take a few. But look at the bright side, you will have an excuse to shoot a lot laugh.gif.

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Here is my two cents worth. I am a fire arms instructor for our department and I spend a lot of time on the range with people who anticipate the shot and end up flinching. This can be an extremely hard habit to break...not something that you can fix with just a session or two. The dummy round thingy is by far the best way to combat this problem. I work one on one with my students and talk about the importance of being relaxed, soft and steady squeeze on the trigger..etc. Do yourself a favor and get some dummy rounds...grab a friend and head to the range. Good luck.

Cliffy.

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