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Browning83

South Dakota License Question

6 posts in this topic

I was wondering what kind of license you need to hunt early goose in South Dakota....for a nonresident. All I saw was an early goose license and federal stamp.($45). I was just wondering if you need a small game license like MN and WI. Anyways any info would be appreciated.

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I know for ND you need a ND state stamp, fed stamp and a small game for reg. season. But in SD I know for reg. season you need to apply by july sometime.I dont know if it is the same for early season.

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There is an excellent Web site for ND G&F Dept. that will tell you all you need to know. wink.gif

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From the South Dakota Game Fish and Parks website:

A South Dakota nonresident waterfowl license is required for a nonresident to hunt migratory waterfowl in South Dakota. Fall licenses are limited in number and distributed by lottery drawing. Thus, one must submit an application with payment either by paper or computer on or before the indicated deadline. All nonresidents must complete the Migratory Bird Certification questions on the application. The license that is issued includes the Migratory Bird Certification privileges.

And also:

The Early Fall Canada Goose Season has been revamped for 2007. All of last year's units have been merged, except for Unit 2 of the regular Canada goose hunting season (most counties on either side of the Missouri River and portions of Fall River and Custer counties) and Unit 4 (Bennett County).

In addition, nonresidents may not hunt in the counties of Beadle, Brookings, Hanson, Kingsbury, Lake, Lincoln, McCook, Miner, Minnehaha, Moody, Sanborn, Turner and Union during the Early Goose season.

Season Dates:

September 8 through September 28.

Licenses

Residents will need a small game license, migratory bird certification stamp, and federal waterfowl stamp.

Nonresident licenses for the Early Fall Canada Goose Season are valid from Sept. 8 through Sept. 28 only. Beginning Sept. 29 nonresidents are required to have either the 10-day or 3-day regular season license.

Nonresidents licenses are $45. Licenses still remain for the Early Goose Season. Use the nonresident waterfowl application to apply for Unit NGW-ST1-86. See the Waterfowl Index page for the link to print applications.

Obtaining one of these licenses does not affect eligibility for other nonresident fall waterfowl licenses.

*The federal waterfowl stamp is required.

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Out of all that, I guess the highlight would be:

Nonresidents licenses are $45. Licenses still remain for the Early Goose Season.

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Thats what I kind of got out of the DNR regs too. Well now all I need are some birds to work our fields.

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