Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
rockman

Need help to for decision to buy a bow...

11 posts in this topic

Here's a newbie question that I could use some help with.Now that you folks steered me towards a couple of decent pro shops, I have something else to consider.I recently started developing symptoms of mild osteo- arthritis in my hands/fingers.It probably stems from family history and work related movement, but here's the deal: Can the rigors of shooting a bow/archery setup be done with someone who has pain, and reduced strength in the hands/fingers from such a condition?You veterans of this type of hunting with this equipment, can tell me better than anyone else. My novice mind on archery tells me that the advances of equipment in this day and age make it reasonably tolerable, if not a pleasure to shoot a bow.I am asking this because there is no sense for me to invest the cash for the equipment, and the time it takes to shoot adequately to hunt if in the long run I can't handle using the tools to do it with. I am not in a dire strait at the moment physically, but some days it hurts like h*ll to pick up a glass of water.Thanks for any feedback you folks have, once again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that if you go to a pro shop and shoot a bow, then you will know for sure. There wont be much pain shooting 1 arrow at a deer. The practice sessions might just need to be shortened up but thats not a big concern either.

I have arthritis and it bothers me some but not that much. You'll have to shoot and see I believe for the best test.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

rock! my $.02.

if you have that kind of pain, then you will also have to deal with it shooting a bow. soem tings that you can do to help is to shoot a lower poundage.30-40 is still a tolerable weight to use for hunting. you can also play with handle sizes that could help some, and shoot a release that has a wrist strap, as this would take most of the pressure off your fingers. it sounds like pain is a given! you have to decide what you can handle. del

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Del,thanks for that dose of reality. If I can sit on a bucket on an ice covered lake holding a rod and reel for hours on end in pain, I can sure hold and shoot a bow. Somehow I have a beginners idea you have to have hurculean strength to fire archery equipment, and that's where my question comes from. Harvey,well that is the reason I posted my inquiry because I figured I am not the only guy who deals with this stuff.Thanks for the insight.I can't quit everything, or not do something because of a bit of pain.I sure do hate weather changes, such as the line of t-storms that just came through here.Ouch for me! Well,it'll be time to go to the pro shop soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One suggestion I might make is to purchase some good used equipment and try it for a couple seasons. If it turns out its too much, you wont be out near the cash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking about this post tonight while I was shooting my bow. I really don't use my hands that much. I shoot with a trigger release so most of my pull is done with my arm and shoulder. My bow hand is very loosly gripping the bow to stabilize it, mostly it is a brace point for the draw and hold. I would be more concerned if you had major shoulder pain or rotator cuff problems. When bowhunting, I really don't grip anything too tightly.

Go to a pro shop, shoot some bows, go with one that has an adjustable drawweight that you find comfortable. It may or may not work for you. I wish you luck, bowhunting is by far my biggest rush in the outdoors.

Harvey has a great suggestion about buying used equipment to keep your investment low, however, if you are buying used, you may settle for a bow that is available and in your price range, instead of trying to find a bow that fits you. I would think that right now would be a great time to try and find a new bow, or maybe a closeout model.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too many people injured themselves because the macho thing to do was shoot the highest poundage out there. ALso many people can't live with a "slower bow". Many many deer fell to stick bows and wooden arrows and I doubt they were shooting 300fps.

The new minimum weight is 30lbs. Its hard to find an adult sized bow that shoots that low, but for the average person you can easily find something in the 45-60lb range that you should be able to hold and shoot comfortably.

I totally agree with hitting the pro shops and shoot as much as you can. FInd something you like and work with that. I have a used bow I bought 2 yrs ago. It cost $250 and I have maybe another $200 into my setup. Thats still way cheaper then you can get into a new bow nowadays. Its worth a shot if you're interested in the sport.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I completely agree with trigger. not much really to do with the hands and fingers if you use a release.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rockman,

I will agree with all suggestions made so far, but I would also throw in the suggestion of after shooting a few bows at a proshop, if you feel a great deal of pain or discomfort, consult your doctor and consider a crossbow. I know this may not be popular with some of the "purest's" but It would be a way for you to be able to archery hunt with a painful condition. I hope that everyone can find a way to enjoy our wonderful sport.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very good suggestion ANYFISH. I guide every fall for a handicapped hunt and this is the only way many with medical issues are able to enjoy and participate in archery. There is nothing wrong with using a crossbow to continue hunting as that is the only way many are able to do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great advice as always here!

i would echo all of the above, and as an instructor reiterate the comments about not gripping tightly. Using a release puts the draw pressure on the wrist, not the fingers...on the bow hand, a relaxed grip keeps you from torquing the bow. Get a wrist sling to prevent the bow from dropping out of your hand. The crossbow is a possible alternative, but you would most likely want a mechanical draw (crank) to cock it....crossbows can be much harder to draw that a regular bow.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Neighbor_guy
      When I left for work yesterday the lake had white caps on it. When I got back 10hrs later it was locked up. An hour after that the first idiot was broke through the landing. If we get the snow they are predicting for Saturday my guess is there will be sleds in the water this weekend. They do it every year.    Patients people. 
    • ZachD
      never been on the ice there but know from the summer there is good ones in there.... Good luck
    • ZachD
      Minnetonka there is a guy named John he just picked up 4 2017 wheel houses to add to his rentals I think he has 7 total now. He knows the lake darn well this is probably you best bet for the limited area you are willing to travel. I will pm you his info
    • Cliff Wagenbach
      I have never fished it in the winter. Do not know of anyone that has either. Should be good though! Cliff
    • eyeguy 54
      he is like a submarine, pops up every once in a while.