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troyslund

runnin deep crank baits?

18 posts in this topic

i read a lot of you guys are runnnin crank baits in deep water, some saying they are using bottom bouncers.. got first boat this summer and trolling cranks is pretty new to me.. what size bottom bouncer are you using? how long of a leader from bouncer to bait? what baits? i'll be on mille lacs sept 1st.. any suggesions on what crank bait and how deep to try? near rocks or flats?

thanks all

keep a tight line! cool.gif

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In my opinion the easiest way to learn to run deep cranks is to pick up a couple No.11 Taildancers. Just run the lures straight behind the boat with anywhere from 90' to 120' of line out. You can always let enough line out until you hit bottom and then wind up a little. No need to use weights or lead core when your just starting.

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Another option is to use 10/4 fireline instead of bottom bouncers. You can troll the mud flats, or off the edges too. Using taildancers, or even #9 Shad Raps, this will get you down plenty deep (trial and error on how much line to let out). It helps to have a line counter reel, or attach one to your rod handle that has your line running through it. That way, when you catch a fish, you know how much line you had out, and you can duplicate! Also keep close track on your speed and try to duplicate that as well. I usually have the best results trolling 2-3 mph. Good luck.

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This is tough, it would depend on what crank you are using.

Start with a .5 ounce or less and see what happens it you wnat to use a weight. Work from there on how it feels hitting bottom or not.

Mark fish and try to get in the general depth of were they are at. Easier said than done.

I would try a perch colored crank. Deep runner or any kind will will get you deep enough is enough line is let out.

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Does anyone ever downrig on Mille Lacs? I have two downriggers on my boat but I have never fished Mille Lacs before, just wondering if it is similar to Lake of the Woods?

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A lot of people don't because there hasn't been much in the way of success and the water is so clear the fish can see the weights.

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I believe down rigging is still in the beginning stages for Mill Lacs. Fives years ago, you would of never heard of anyone “down rigging”. In the last couple of years I have talked with people who down riged from up by Cross Lake down to Mill Lacs. As this practice becomes more common, the industry will provide more Mill Lac friendly equipment. I agree, down rigging is not a practical practice for Mill Lacs. I also am in the club of trying new things. If you have them on your boat, give it a shot. I would lean more towards plainer board use, because this is a great way to maximize your boats potential and cover more ground. Out on the flats that are deep, down rigging with cranks could be a good idea. If you have them.

Side Note: Some of the guys I know that are on the PWT use down rigging for some lakes.

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Remember troyslund, if you are trolling the mud you may not feel the bottom! It is basically silt.

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If the downrigger thing works let me know. I agree with the line counter thing. If you find something that works it will be easier to duplicate. It has to be better than guessing. So. you say tha water is really clear? I haven't fished anything with out floaties yet. I hope it is not windy this weekend!

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If you dont want to buy a new linecounter reel count passes on your baitcaster. Measure how much line in with 1 pass across spool while reeling in. I have several different baitcasters and it seems that 3' per pass is pretty accurate.

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How can you tell? I would have to measure it out. I do a lot of night fishing, and don't think I could sit and watch how many times the thingey went back and fourth. But if it works for you keep doin it. Line counter reals are actually quite inexpensive. Just my 2 cents ..

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There is a book called Precision trolling. It lists all cranks and running depths with the correct line amount out.

I would pick up a line counter reel. I like the Shimano Tekota around $155. You can pick up Daiwa reels for under $100.

The deep running tail dancers will get you to almost 30 ft deep. grin.gif

You could always use a bottom bouncer with floating rapalas or shad raps. Keep it off the bottom.

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Some alternatives to the expensive Shimano reels: Rapala makes a line counter that clips on to any pole, I think it's about $15, plus it comes with a lure depth book. Also Cabelas has a line of counter reels that are pretty cheap.

Just a tip I've found, the line counter reels don't measure the line they only count the revolutions of the spool (I think they are calibrated for a full spool of line), the clip on counters are more acurate. I checked my line counter reel and found out it was about 25% off, that's a lot if you're trying to run a lure with the aid of one of the charts.

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I found the drag on the cabelas #20 line counter reels to be way more predictable than diawa. I got those for around 30$. Good deal. And yes the precision trolling bible is an awsome book. Wouldn't be with out it!

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Great info!!!

The reason I mentioned the Shimano reels are because the

line capacity was a little smaller than some of the other reels, and as far as I'm concerned, they have the best drag out there.

I've looked at the Cabela's reels and may purchase one of them also.

I haven't tried the line counters that clip on the rods. I've heard that they don't work the best.

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I actually have both line counters & baitcasters and was just giving some different options for determining amt of lie out. Dont fish much at night either so counting passes is no problem. Works alot better than just letting line out for a while. At least you can get back to exact amt of line out. Thats my $0.02 grin.gif

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Braided Line and Mono, you can mark with a perm. marker or bobber stop to let you know how much line is out or depth.

I am old school grin.gif. Let her buck and wait for the strike. have spool open and index fingure on line. You feel a nibble or bite, let out line and set hook. After years of doing this, you have a good feel and I can not remember the last time I gut hooked a fish.

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Before I started trolling with bottom bouncers, I wasn't putting many fish in the boat and the ones I did were small. Buying some Daiwa trolling reels with the line counters and some colored lead core line is the smartest thing I have ever learned to use in my trolling methods. I use 2 oz. bottom bouncers with another 2-4 oz. of egg shell sinkers added to it to make my bb's a total of 4-6 oz (if wanting to troll deep water like mille lacs). Run a mono leader (10-12 pd. test) 10-12 feet from your bottom bouncer and tie on your desired crank. Find what's working, what depth the active fish are at, and duplicate your method the rest of the day until the fish stop biting, then it's back to the drawing board, find the depth they are at and duplicate again. Use your electronics to find the fish and put your bait in that range within a few feet.

Make sure to set your drag just enough so that the line is not coming out of the spool. You don't need your drag set on "extra stiff" to make a good hook set when you are moving (provided your hooks are sharp and well kept). If you snag, this way your line will not snap and the reel will allow line to drag out. You will know when it is a fish because the line will usually zip out, stop, and then zip out again. Many of times though, I have started reeling and thought I had a snag or a log attached to my lure and than all of a sudden a fatty walleye emerges. It is a great feeling when you think you are pulling in the infamous log bass and a trophy shows himself at boatside.

Good luck and don't get down if you aren't putting fish in the boat right away, it took me a good 6 months to figure the trolling thing out. It's worth it though....the trophies you will catch compared to the eaters!

GoggleEye

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