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99ranger

Boat in the Rocks Wahkon Bay!!!!!

22 posts in this topic

On Sunday afternoon I was out fishing outside of Wahkon Bay. I was fishing near numerous rock bouys as most people will know several spots around in the area. Anyhow! I am fishing 40ft from a bouy and this Inboard/Skiboat comes cruising past me at full speed between me and the Rock marker i was fishing about 20 25ft away from me. This did not make me happy at all as most would think.The boat did not even slow down and kept going south right into the rocks. Needless to say It was not stopping when I waved at it. It then ran right in to the rocks at full speed. It ripped the lower unit clean off with parts flying 30ft out of the water. It looked as if took the lower unit above the cavitation plate even. They people did not even know what had happened the way it looked. I am glad all were ok. But what i want to know what the heck they were thinking. One to drive that close to a boat at full speed and then to go past the bouys like that. It was worse then Swindle in the Classic this spring. Well that will teach them to pay attention.

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Good humor. I am sure this type will find something to blame it on and not learn a thing. Good hear no one was injured. Doh!!!

tweed

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You want to know what they were thinking? Probably hey we need more beer.

I don't feel one bit sorry for people foolish enough to drive through markers and destroy their boat. They were lucky no one was hurt or killed.

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When I was reading the post, I was reminded of Swindle at the Classic. That just sounds dumb, and possibly alcohol induced. It is pretty incredible what some people will do.

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The only difference is that Swindle most likely knew the water whereas these other folks most likely did not.

It just goes to show that until you are familiar with an area you should not go full bore.

Sure there were other issues like the guy coming so close to the fishing boat.

What are people thinking sometimes,it just baffles me.

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Could they hear you laughing out loud? that would be the second thing I would have made sure of in that situation. The first being that everyone was okay, but that whole side of the lake would have heard me laughing my rather large posterior side off.

I agree with the previous poster on the beer run idea

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they could have been on a beer run, but they might have just been plain stupid.....with more and more people owning boats just means there are more people that don't have a clue as to what to watch for and how to respect a lake and the people on them.....they should require a license to drive a boat just like a car.....I got buzzed about 10 times on Sunday on a smaller lake......people just cruising around but feel the need to drive within 30ft from us at full speed...Thanks tongue.gif

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Did you help them/give them a tow?

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I did not help them out for several reasons. 1. They were on the flat with rocks that I was not going to be able to get to them with my boat with out breaking something. 2. They were blowing away from me. 3. The wind had picked up bad and I was trying just to be where I was at and ended up having to head for shore due to the wind. 4. They did not wave or want any help. 5. Plus I was trying to stay in my boat from laughing so hard.

I know it sounds bad but what do you do. Cant really feel bad if they want to be that way. And they did not want any help.

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Its hard to offer help to folk that don't want help.

Been there, done that...

Most of the time, its pride (and embarrassment) that takes over and they just don't want anyone to lend a hand.

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"I'm trying, I'm trying, I'm trslurring." grin.gif

Later,

Corey Bechtold

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"Hey fellas, you got anymore Beerss?"

Der der der.

Someone was not thinking that day.

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This made me think of what I should have in the boat in case we have a problem out in the lake. I'm relatively new to boating and want to be prepared if anything ever happens. Besides the safety things like fire extinguisher, cell phones etc what else can I do to be ready? Flare guns, extra battery etc? Appreciate anyone chipping in some info.

Big Cahuna

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Airhorn and or whistle is good to have and required for boats over 17' I think. Also, a rope you can use for towing is nice to have.

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If you are going to be on the big lake, a marine band radio is sure nice.

I would also carry:

- Lifejackets (req'd)

- Throwable (req'd)

- Fire Extinguisher

- Air Horn

- Simple tool kit

- First Aid Kit

- Heavy Duty Rope

- Spare prop & prop wrench isn't a bad idea either

- Cell Phone

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- Fire Extinguisher

- Air Horn

Are these two items required for a boat over 16'?

I thought they were. I got them and luckily never have had to us them (crossing fingers). I got searched on 5 mile once and they asked me to see them. I got a written warning for not having throw able out in plain site (under console).

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Quote:

- Fire Extinguisher

- Air Horn

Are these two items required for a boat over 16'?


I believe so.

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I had 50% of that list. I am very glad I asked. Thanks to everyone that pitched in.

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Quote:


Its hard to offer help to folk that don't want help.

Been there, done that...

Most of the time, its pride (and embarrassment) that takes over and they just don't want anyone to lend a hand.


Double + double on the been there done that!

Some of us get the Jeff Spikolie or the Tim Allen attitude in cases like this. Others just tend to sink back and wonder what to do or all out panic! These are the times it is way better off to wave for help.

I also have boated up to people that are having troubles, to find they do not need or want my help. This is "just" the right thing to do (Minnesota Nice) and at least you know you tried to help them. Especially if you see or hear on the evening news something happened to them. That’s the way I look at it.

“Cross my fingers”! I have never had to be towed yet! But, if I ever find my self on hard times, it is nice to know Minnesota Boaters are some of the best out their!

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I suppose you could have offered them more beer if you had any smile.gif

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I would not have wasted a good beer on them. I would have needed it to enjoy the show watching them.

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Quote:

The boat did not even slow down and kept going south right into the rocks. It then ran right in to the rocks at full speed.


Man attempts to to rock climb on Mille Lacs.. details at 10:00

PS: Don't try this at home...

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