Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
barney

July 28 thru August 10 report and comments

5 posts in this topic

My family enjoyed another fantastic trip to Lake Vermilion. We targeted walleyes exclusively and found them in 12'-21'of water on our favorite Big Bay reefs. 3ft snells with a yellow float,a transparent green bead,size 8 Gamakatsu hook, and a one ounce bottom bouncer did the trick. We used nite crawlers exclusively and hooked the whole crawler through the tip of the nose. I have found that using the whole crawler produces more lip hooked fish. We miss a bunch of "hits" but it's way better than letting a bleeding 17" or better fish go. There seems to be an abundance of 14"-16"+ walleyes this year and the fishery appears healthy at this time. I just hope the up and coming 14-16 inchers are off somewhere eating crayfish getting ready for their turn. We caught fewer slot fish than in the spring and my percentage fell off to ~8% from over 20%in the spring.

Trout Lake has become a serious disappointment during our July/August time slot. It seems that bass are "taking over" every reef on the lake. It's virtually impossible to try to "work" for reluctant walleyes without losing your bait to bass. Fortunately, spring fishing is still great when the bass are still in spawning mode.

My "controversial" comment for this post will involve the intersection at Hwy 77 and the Ledge store. Why in the world doesn't "the powers that be" put up flashing yellow lights and reduce the speed limit to 30mph from every direction before another terrible accident happens? How many fatal accidents have to happen before they do something? The August 8 accident put a damper on an otherwise very enjoyable visit. We pray everyone survived.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The state doesn't want to slow traffic down in that area because it would only become more congested. There is talk out there about combining hwy 1 and 77 to eliminate some of the confusion but with the new bridge going in on hwy it doesn't seem logical to reroute it now. I had also hear discussions of moving 169 to the east side of the Ystore or splitting and putting 169 nb on the east side and sb at its current location. That to me sounds like alot of confusion. Who knows what they will do. The upgrades they did to the intersection last year have helped. You will always have the people that look one way but forget to look the other or assume its still clear even though 30 seconds have passed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When entering Virginia, there are stop lights on a 65mph highway! I am sorry, but I can't understand how "slowing down" vehicles approaching the Hwy77/Ledge intersection to 30mph would contribute to the congestion. Getting T-boned by a vehicle travelling 55mph+ is not proper punishment for not looking both ways at an intersection with a historical traffic problem. Something needs to be done now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

My family enjoyed another fantastic trip to Lake Vermilion. We targeted walleyes exclusively and found them in 12'-21'of water on our favorite Big Bay reefs. 3ft snells with a yellow float,a transparent green bead,size 8 Gamakatsu hook, and a one ounce bottom bouncer did the trick. We used nite crawlers exclusively and hooked the whole crawler through the tip of the nose. I have found that using the whole crawler produces more lip hooked fish. We miss a bunch of "hits" but it's way better than letting a bleeding 17" or better fish go. There seems to be an abundance of 14"-16"+ walleyes this year and the fishery appears healthy at this time. I just hope the up and coming 14-16 inchers are off somewhere eating crayfish getting ready for their turn. We caught fewer slot fish than in the spring and my percentage fell off to ~8% from over 20%in the spring.

Trout Lake has become a serious disappointment during our July/August time slot. It seems that bass are "taking over" every reef on the lake. It's virtually impossible to try to "work" for reluctant walleyes without losing your bait to bass. Fortunately, spring fishing is still great when the bass are still in spawning mode.

My "controversial" comment for this post will involve the intersection at Hwy 77 and the Ledge store. Why in the world doesn't "the powers that be" put up flashing yellow lights and reduce the speed limit to 30mph from every direction before another terrible accident happens? How many fatal accidents have to happen before they do something? The August 8 accident put a damper on an otherwise very enjoyable visit. We pray everyone survived.


A few people I know have been hammering the walleyes on trout. Lots if 7 lb plus fish aswell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because of fantastic fishing in Vermilion, I made only one trip into Trout this last visit. I put Jim Zak on my permit and he lost his propeller on the middle reef in South bay at 9:30 in the morning! I spent the rest of the morning towing him back to the portage and, ultimately, back to his place on Vermilion. Up to that time, we had caught nothing but bass at 4 other pretty good locations for this time of year. The reef at the end of Pine island was full of walleyes but the bass drove us nuts.

Trout Lake has spoiled me for a very long time. I like it when the "hits" are walleyes and the older I get, the less patience I seem to have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • trebormorgan
      It's Thursday, March 23rd, and we're still running four wheelers on many of the lakes north of Brainerd. The panfish action was hot last weekend, especially up in the shallow spikes close to deep water. The small cold-snap that hit early in the week seemed to slow the bite and push some fish out on the breaks that lead to shallow spikes. It's a special time of year. I watched my brother release multiple slabs over 14", multiple walleyes over 20", and some nice bass, all while fishing in 5 ft of water. It doesn't happen to us often, but it last weekend it was hard to find the eater-size crappies. Almost every fish was over 13". Good times.    How's everyone else doing out there?  Any new suggestions on panfish presentations, jigs, plastics..etc?   Good luck to all that get out on the last ice, and be safe!
    • Capt. Quicksteel
      Welcome to Minnesota. I moved to the metro from way up north about 20 years ago so faced some of the same questions. Once I scouted a bunch of local WMA's I found several that didn't get much bow hunting pressure. Most days you're by yourself. But you have to be prepared for the unexpected. Once I was in a tree stand near some water. Right after sunrise I heard some shooting and shouting and a minute later a nice looking black lab ran past my stand with a mallard in his mouth! I didn't even know they were sitting in a blind down the shore from me. All in all I have had pretty good luck at finding places to hunt especially if you can go during the week.
    • Rick
      Following the pattern observed in neighboring states, white-nose syndrome, a disease that can be fatal to hibernating bats, has now been confirmed in six Minnesota counties, according to the Department of Natural Resources.  The disease has recently been confirmed in Becker, Dakota, Fillmore, Goodhue and Washington counties. Minnesota’s first confirmed case of WNS was in St. Louis County last March. The disease is named for the white fungal growth observed on infected bats. It is not known to pose a threat to humans, pets, livestock or other wildlife. The recent DNR bat surveys have recorded declines in the annual bat count ranging from 31 to 73 percent in locations where WNS has been confirmed. The 73 percent decrease was observed at Soudan Underground Mine in St. Louis County, where the disease was first confirmed in Minnesota a year ago. DNR biologists think the sharp decline there may reflect how long the disease has been present. With WNS confirmed in Fillmore County in southeastern Minnesota, the count at Brightsdale Tunnel was down 39 percent from last year, and the count at Bat River Cave decreased 31 percent. “While some locations are still testing negative, the results of recent surveys lead us to conclude that WNS is likely to be present anywhere bats hibernate in Minnesota,” said Ed Quinn, DNR natural resource program supervisor. “Four of Minnesota’s bat species hibernate, and four species migrate. WNS will have a substantial effect on Minnesota’s hibernating bat population. Neighboring states have reported declines of 70 to 95 percent in specific locations, as we recorded this year at Soudan Mine.” Although the disease is transmitted primarily from bat to bat, people can inadvertently carry fungal spores to other caves on clothing and caving gear. For several years, public tours of Soudan Underground Mine and Mystery Cave have begun with a brief lesson on how to prevent the spread of WNS. Both before and after tours, visitors are required to walk across special mats designed to remove spores from footwear, and they are advised not to wear the same clothing, footwear or gear when visiting other caves or mines where bats may be present. Multiple washings in a standard washing machine will not provide sufficient decontamination. Tours will continue at Soudan Underground Mine and Mystery Cave, where the DNR will continue to follow recommended national decontamination protocols to prevent human transport of fungal spores. The DNR urges owners of private caves to learn about WNS and take similar visitor precautions as outlined in the protocols. The DNR is working with federal and state officials to consider a variety of treatment trials, to test new fungicides that may kill WNS spores. Treatments are unlikely to eradicate WNS, but could slow the spread and reduce the number of bat deaths. DNR biologists conduct winter bat counts in several Minnesota hibernacula each year. “We use these counts to compare the number of bats in a site from year to year. Although we count all of the bats that we see, more are likely in areas we can’t reach,” said DNR mammalogist Gerda Nordquist. WNS was first documented in North America in 2007 in eastern New York and has since spread to 30 states and five Canadian provinces, killing more than 5.7 million bats. Nordquist encourages anyone who sees a sick or dead bat to submit a Bat Observation Report. DNR staff reviews these reports and additional follow-up or testing is conducted as needed. To learn more about WNS and Minnesota’s bats, visit mndnr.gov/wns. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Tom Sawyer

            Can't fix stupid! That crack, now forming a pressure ridge, about mid-lake, is plenty reason not to drive even a car out there. Won't take much to break that lake apart soon the way it was chuckin ice, especially rain. Some areas had 12". Hopefully the heavy rain stays away.
    • Neutz68
      Thinking about heading up to the Backus - Hackensack area this weekend.. How did the ice survive this week up there??