Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Boar

Whats your favored scent eliminator

22 posts in this topic

I usually use a baconsoda water spray, I think thats what scent killer actually is, I also like to shake some ash from the fire place on myself an keep my cloths in a tote with ash an leaves an brush from my hunting land, but what do you guys prefer to put on just before going to stand? I've wanted to try this stuff called Tru carbon by natural preditor but sheels an cabelas never heard of the stuff, might have to order straight from the manufaturer. Boar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use all the scent bathing products and wear scent lok clothes. If where I'm hunting there are cattle, I also walk through the cow pies for my boots to cover where I'm walking. Other than that, nothing. I do spray my bow and stand down with some carbon spray every so often.

I also rely heavely on the wind direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had pretty good luck with scent killer products from wildlife research and then like harvey stated watching the wind and my entry - exit paths. I am thinking about getting a pair of rubber boots as I see a lot of pros on tv wearing them.... Later into October I tend to have a smell of trails end 307 on my clothes. I'm not sure as too how it gets there but it does.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I reference to your post harvey, nothong actually helps? good, I dont like em either, very uncomfortable in stand I bet. hee hee. boar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

paceman, you said it. Rubber boats are the way to go. smile.gif They are wonderful for getting to and resturning from your stand with very little scent left. I have been wearing thewm for years now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like wildlife research scent killer. I have tried others and haven't like them too much. I had several smaller bucks circle me last year and come directly down wind at 15-20 yards and never knew I was there. Scent lock suit and spray down before going to stand with scent killer really seemed to work well for me last year. I do my very best to watch the wind also, but the big boys have a tendancy to circle ya, so that isn't always the only solution. Two of the spots I hunt are in a valley and the wind likes to swirl and carry scent everywhere. Scent killer is key in these spots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watch the wind is all I do, those scent eliminator clothes have been proven not to work, they're just have your $$$$$.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If one watches the wind and does all the other programs right, you will see more deer and will not be busted near as much.

Any product that you feel will help with your scent should be used. I know hunters that do twice what I do for scent control and also see twice the bucks I do.

From the scent lok clothes, to scent control spray or your homemade sprays, they all help. Anything one can do to minimize thier scent from the deers nose will benifit you afield.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really Trails End 307? Hmm... me too, along with Tinks #69 & whatever else I find on the shelf cheap come 11/1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dead Down Wind, I don't beleive in carbon spray or carbon clothing. I have used the carbon spray and I can smell it on my clothes. I use a tote and wash my clothes often and use rubber boots. I change out in the woods which can get cold sometimes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was'nt there a long topic on carbon cloths a couple years ago, some guy that had worked for the military or something had some data on what it actually takes to activate carbon to absorb scent? Dose anyone remember that? I dont own a carbon suit but if it gives others confidence, great. I used to work for Theif Lake WMA an one thing we used to controll outhouse oders on the public landing was to dump a coffe can of ash down the privey an it worked, I guesse thats why I use ash cause it basically carbon an its been activated by extreame heat. Boar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be interested in seeing any data on the ability of the carbon suits to absorb odor. I'm sure they work to some degree, and that how well they work is dependent on how much odor you are trying to cover. Heat will re-generate activated carbon, but it's a function of the temperature and the grade of carbon. Probably a dryer isn't hot enough to completely re-generate the absorptive pores, but still it probably also does some good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I talked with a rep from Scent Lok last week. Here what he stated about activating scent lok clothes. Place them in the dryer for approx 10 minutes. Now, one has to remember that with the dryers that control heat by moisture content, that some of these may not be ideal for re-activating the carbon.

One should run the dryer with the clothes in and feel and see if your dryer is throwing any heat. One may have to moisten the clothes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another member here on FM posted a recipe for a homemade scent killer awhile back. My dad, my brother, and I used it during bow season last year and none of us ever got busted but we also rely heavily on playing the wind. I don't remember right off hand what was in it but do a search and I'm sure you can find the original post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only 10 minutes? I have a ScentLok tag right here from a jacket and it states the following about using the dryer: "...set on a medium to high heat--for 40 minutes..."

I do an hour, just because. Longer can't hurt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just checked on thier website and they state there to place in dryer at 150 degrees for 20-30 minutes. I also saw other places where they stated different timnes and temps. I guess I will go with their suggestion and not the 10 minutes at high. Seems like the same heat would get to the clothes either way.

It might be that over the years that the different clothes made have different temps. Your tag says one thing, I was told another and thier website states another.

maybe just get some heat to it for a little while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done some reading on the effectiveness of acivated carbon suits and I guess I am one of the last hold outs that they are not the golden bullet we all desire. All the "pro" write-ups are from guys who harvested a buck or elk while wearing the suit... sounds great! but would they have gotten the same animal without it. I gotta believe YES! Look to the 'old days', with hunters like Myles Keller, Otis 'Toad' Smith, Chuck Adams and the Wenzel brothers, they all harvested many book animals w/o the use of these suits and they did so consistantly. Some may wear them now, I guess I don't know for sure... but is that because of their effectiveness or because they are paid staff members... remember, for many of these guys, hunting is their source of livelihood. None of the articles that are 'pro' suit use scientific data to support that the suits work. Most every "con" article uses scientific data and the reasoning why it cannot work. Here is an example of the articles available on carbon suits...

The extreme commercialization of bow hunting has, in my opinion, resulted instances where hunters have been duped. In fact, I can think of several products that are down right gimmicks and obviously seek to play upon consumer ignorance and slob hunters looking for success shortcuts.

The question has been raised: Can activated-carbon scent elimination clothing really give you an edge against the nose of this animal?

I was once asked, “What do you think is the biggest gimmick on the (outdoors equipment) market is today?” I will warn you up front that my response to the question, which follows, may be a bit painful. Furthermore, I will say that if you do find my response painful, it’s likely that you spent your hard earned wages on the product that I’m about to scrutinize.

Here goes: I believe the biggest gimmick on the outdoors equipment market today is activated-carbon scent elimination clothing that are being marketed under various brand names. You know the ones I’m talking about, so I won’t name names. I’m talking about all of them.

If you’re a bow hunter and believe in the effectiveness of these special garments, hopefully you aren't so angry that you stop reading this article. Because if you read this in its entirety, I promise that you will learn something.

There is a difference between ignorance and stupidity, and I would never dream of calling my fellow bow hunters stupid. It’s the ignorance (i.e. the lack of knowledge) factor that has led many quality and even professional bow hunters to be fooled by the claims made by the manufacturers of scent elimination clothing.

I plan to educate you, not point fingers or spit propaganda. Before I do though, I’ll tell you a bit about myself. I am a biologist by education and received my Bachelor of Science degree from Florida State University. I’ve worked in the environmental protection field for more than ten years.

I have worked with various forms of activated-carbon, the same material that is used in the many brands of scent elimination clothing. Many of you have read articles by authors that claim their scent elimination clothing was pinnacle in helping them tag the biggest buck; without it, the hunt would not have been successful.

What’s new? That is a common marketing strategy used to push new equipment. Bow hunters, despite what gear they choose, are a traditional bunch. Many of us have gained knowledge on how to hunt our query and what equipment to use through word of mouth and testimonials of other perceived more knowledgeable bow hunters.

When Chuck Adam, for instance, talks or writes, I listen and pay attention. I’d be crazy if I didn’t. He is without question a knowledgeable bow hunter and we all stand to learn a lot from an experienced bow hunter like him.

The problem with these scent elimination garments is, unless you have a science background and to an even greater extent, have worked in the environmental protection / remediation profession, you simply cannot posses a clear understanding of how activated-carbon works.

So, as I promised, I am going to tell you how activated-carbon works and why it is my opinion that activated-carbon scent elimination garments are ineffective. Then you can take the information presented here and make an educated decision for yourself.

activated-carbon comes in several forms and is used in many applications as a filtering or cleansing media. activated-carbon can be manufactured from carbonaceous material, including coal (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite), peat, wood, or nutshells (i.e., coconut shells or walnut shells).

The manufacturing process consists of two phases: carbonization and activation. The carbonization process includes drying and then heating to separate by-products, including tars and other hydrocarbons, from the raw material, as well as to drive off any gases generated. Heating the material at 400–600°C (752-1472°F) in an oxygen-deficient atmosphere that cannot support combustion completes the carbonization process.

activated-carbon comes in the form of a very fine powder, which is impregnated or weaved into the textile fibers of garments. It also comes in a granular form. Both forms are used in various applications including to purify both water and air. Some of the popular drinking water filters and mechanical air filters on the market use activated-carbon as a filter media.

activated-carbon is an extremely porous material with high ratios of surface area to unit weight. One pound of activated-carbon contains up to 100 acres of surface area!

activated-carbon has a particular affinity to organic materials such as volatile organic compounds or VOC’s. Human odor is composed of different gaseous molecules of VOC’s and other chemicals such as hydrogen sulfides, which are absorbed by activated-carbon.

Think of activated-carbon as a common sponge that you would use to wash dishes with. Take a sponge and place it in a cup of water. What happens? It soaks up the water. The sponge, like activated-carbon, has thousands of little pores and channels running through it. When activated-carbon soaks up human “stink” odors, it does so through a process called adsorption.

Stinky gasses (i.e. human odors) are adsorbed into the many micro pores on and within the activated-carbon and are retained there. Now, what happens when a sponge becomes saturated?

A sponge that is saturated with water cannot adsorb any more. Hold a saturated sponge full of water in your hand and you will observe water dripping from it. When activated-carbon in a water or air filter becomes saturated it is called breakthrough.

In short, when a water’s or air filter’s filter media (i.e. activated-carbon) becomes saturated with contaminants, the filter is rendered useless and the contaminants contained in the water or air stream pass through the filter. After a while, you will be drinking dirty water or breathing stinky air until the filter is replaced. Makes sense right?

Think of activated-carbon as a molecular sponge. As is the case with any sponge, activated-carbon can only hold or adsorb so much stinky stuff. Once activated-carbon becomes saturated with contaminants, it must be reactivated or replaced entirely.

What do you do with a sponge that is saturated with water? You squeeze it to release the adsorbed water so you can reuse it. Or, you simply get a new dry sponge. Like the sponge analogy, activated-carbon must be “squeezed out” so to speak, in order to reactivate it for reuse.

Now you know how activated-carbon works. Most of the information I just provided can be found on some of the more popular scent elimination garment manufacturers’ web sites.

So far you might be thinking to yourself “Wow, activated-carbon really works”. Well, it does work, sort of.

activated-carbon is a fine filter media, but using activated-carbon as the key component in a scent elimination garment is not a practical application.

Unlike a common kitchen sponge, you can’t just leave it on the counter and let it dry out. In order to re-activate activated-carbon, it must undergo a process called Pyrolysis. To fully re-activate saturated activated-carbon, you must heat it to approximately 800 °C or 1,472 °F, in a controlled atmosphere of low oxygen concentration to reduce the possibility of combustion.

This is scientific fact and is even stated in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Engineering and Design, Adsorption Design Guide, Design Guide No. DG1110-1-2, if you’d like to check it out for yourself. This fact is not however mentioned on any of the popular scent elimination clothing manufacturers’ websites.

One of the most popular scent elimination clothing manufactures instructs consumers to simply place worn garments in a common household clothes dryer for 20 to 30 minutes to re-active the carbon in the garment. The average temperature generated by a clothes dryer does not even come close to being able to generate the extreme temperatures necessary to drive out contaminants absorbed in the many micropores and channels of activated-carbon. In fact, most residential clothes dryers only heat up to a temperature that is well under 200°F.

Those of you, whom use water filters or air filters in your homes, think about it. Why can’t you just boil your filters in hot water or throw them in the oven or microwave for a few minutes to re-activate the carbon filter media. You can’t; that’s why. You don’t own special multi million-dollar pyrolysis thermal regeneration equipment that produces enough heat to re-activate carbon. Therefore, you have to buy new filters every now and then.

Re-activating carbon for industrial uses is big business. Type in the words “activated-carbon” in your favorite Internet search engine and you will see what I’m talking about here. In order to fully reactivate the activated-carbon in one of the many scent elimination garments on the market, you might as well just throw the garment in your campfire, because the extreme heat necessary to re-activate the carbon would likely destroy the garment anyway.

Forgive my sarcasm, but I tend to get irritated when I see good folks getting duped. And as a class, I think bow hunters are a pretty good bunch. So as a product, I think all the activated-carbon scent elimination clothing products on the market are nothing more than gimmicks.

I do not believe, based on sound science, these garments are even effective the first time you use it. Think about it. Each garment would have to be manufactured and placed in a sealed, scent proof bag when shipped and remain sealed on the shelf at retail stores. This is not the case, however.

From the minute the clothing is manufactured, it begins to adsorb “stink” and continues to adsorb “stink” while awaiting an ignorant, misinformed consumer to purchase it. It is likely that the activated-carbon contained in the garment is already completely saturated with “stink” upon being purchased.

Many of the scent proof garment manufacturers somewhat acknowledge this, in an attempt to bring some legitimacy to their product. They recommend that you immediately wash and re-activate garments by placing them in a clothes dryer as soon as the product is purchased. Funny, they also happen to recommend their own brand of laundry detergent that is special made for these special garments.

As I explained above, washing and drying the garment is merely an exercise in futility. At best, the only way these garments could be manufactured and utilized effectively would be if they were designed for one time use. In other words, they would have to be disposable.

The military actually uses activated-carbon suits as a kind of chemical protection garment, but they’re a single-use, disposable garment and not intended for multiple washings.

Here is something else you should consider before purchasing one of these products: activated-carbon’s adsorption effectiveness when used in an air filter application becomes greatly reduced when it is wet. So what happens when you sweat during those humid early season bow hunts? That’s right, your clothing gets wet and becomes even less effective.

A leading manufacturer of activated-carbon garments admits that no laboratory testing has been conducted to determine the effectiveness of the clothing when it is wet from hunter’s perspiration.

So why the craze? Why are so many hunters rushing out to purchase these garments, when the science-based fact is that they don’t work?

As I mentioned earlier, consumer ignorance is one reason. I think another reason is that many hunters so badly want to believe that they can purchase something that will render them invisible to a whitetail’s or elk’s nose.

As I said earlier, many of you have read articles by authors that claim their scent elimination clothing was pinnacle in helping them tag the biggest buck; with out it, the hunt would not have been successful. I truly believe the fact that these hunters who wore these garments while achieving success, can be chalked up to being merely a coincidence. Many of the authors who wrote these type articles failed to mention they were wearing their lucky hat and that their lucky rabbits foot was in their pocket at the time.

All sarcasm aside, I think many successful hunters who wear these special garments fail to recognize that they have been consciously paying closer attention to personal hygiene techniques before every hunt.

You must understand that none of the success story articles that push these special garments are based on science studies. They are opinions; misinformed ones at that.

I’ve talked to a few technical representatives with some of the more popular scent elimination clothing manufacturers and none of them have performed controlled scientific studies to demonstrate the true effectiveness of these garments. However, they claim to have “field tested” the garments. Come on folks. How do you field-test these garments?

It is said that a deer can smell nearly 1,000 times better than humans. You cannot legitimately observe the effectiveness of these garments or read a whitetail’s mind. No one, to the best of my knowledge, has contracted a non-biased independent laboratory or university to demonstrate the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of this clothing.

It is my belief that the manufacturers of these specialty garments know what the results of such a study would show; therefore it would not behoove them to undertake such an exercise. So they just claim the garments are field tested by the product-pushing pros.

As stated earlier: This is just my opinion, but it’s one based on sound science, education and a realistic view of product marketing techniques.

Now you can form your own opinion. Good Hunting.

Biologist and environmentalist Michael Corrigan is an avid bow hunter and enjoys educating other bow hunters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I don't disagree scientifically with anything you've stated LABS4ME I do see a lack of data in your response. Technically, you're correct and I too know a thing or two about activated carbon. But what both the manufacturers and the detractors fail to provide is data.

Fundamentally, it is a function of the capacity of the garment to absorb, verses the rate it absorbs certain types of scent molecules, verses the concentration of those specific things that need to be absorbed. I don't know of any published studies that provide this data in a real life situation. Without that data, you can argue it either way and neither side can be sure they are right. I personally feel that the garments have some effect, but are not a cure all. Without specific data, it is all just theory from both sides.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, when using bath products and the scent lok products, it gives me the confidence I need to hunt harder as I believe that I'm more protected. Maybe a sub conscious thing but I do sit more still and hunt harder when I believe I have went that extra mile, which in the end helps.

It all helps to some degree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats the article I was wondring about. What ever gives a guy confidence in the feild works for me. I use the bath products also an especially the underarm antiperspirant an using it on all exposed skin areas, I really try to cut back on the caffine an any spicy foods well before a hunt, that all runs out your pours when you sweat. Anyway good luck this year guys. Boar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Labs, thanks for the input. I have not put faith in the scentlok suits, but I go the extra mile with soaps, sprays, rubber boots and of course play the wind....

Spend the extra cash on some more deer stands...

gl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I rigged up a pully system under the awning of my shed. My hunting clothes are outside all the time once hunting season begins and are still protected from the elements. Other wise they are in a plastic tote to and from my hunting locations. I will only change clothes in the field to minimize my time in them. I also perodically wash them with scent killer laundry soap, I use scentless soap before hunting when at all possible and douse my self with eaither a carbon spray or scent killer. If im hunting in pines i will cut some branchs and rub those on my clothes as well. Cow pies work great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • Hoey
      Here is a photo of the foot.  Looks like a toothy gator.  
    • BringAnExtension
      http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2017/07/21/fish-injury-island-lake/   DULUTH, Minn. (AP) — An 11-year-old girl has undergone surgery to repair damage to her foot which might have been caused by a fish in a northeastern Minnesota lake. Maren Kesselhon suffered nine deep lacerations and tendon damage when she was injured while sitting on a paddleboard on Island Lake north of Duluth Wednesday. Maren’s dad, Ryan Kesselhorn, says his daughter told him she could feel her foot in the mouth of a fish and kicked at it with her other foot to free herself. The Dickinson Press reports doctors at Essentia Health, where Maren had surgery, say the razor-sharp cuts, some down to the bone, probably were caused by a fish. Island Lake is home to large muskies and northern pike. A Duluth fisherman caught and released a 47-inch long muskie Wednesday.
    • RoosterMan
      Captain Acorn, I fish Jiggin Raps quite a bit on Vermilion, have for several years now.  I Cast em, fish them vertical and move around and cover ground at a good pace with them.  I am not sure there is any key to getting snagged less, other than knowing your spots. They are certainly an effective and a great way to catch fish.  I personally do not remove either the front or the back hook.  Believe me if you fish these your going to donate a few to the depths, just part of the game.    Good luck! - Roosterman
    • Rick
      Walleye fishing on Mille Lacs Lake will remain closed until Aug. 11 to protect the walleye fishery, and ensure its long-term health and sustainability into the future To extend the walleye fishing season through Labor Day, the state will allow for an additional 11,000 pounds of walleye harvest on Mille Lacs New solutions are being sought to rebuild and sustain a healthy Mille Lacs walleye fishery New fisheries data collected by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources show the total safe harvest allocation for walleyes on Mille Lacs Lake (44,800 pounds) has already been exceeded this season. To protect the fishery and ensure the long-term sustainability of Mille Lacs Lake’s walleye population, the DNR announced today that walleye fishing will remain closed until Friday, Aug. 11. In order to extend the walleye fishing season through Labor Day, the state will allow for an additional 11,000 pounds of walleye harvest. Catch-and-release walleye fishing will run from Friday, Aug. 11, through Monday, Sept. 4, for the Labor Day weekend. Walleye fishing will then be closed from Tuesday, Sept. 5, through Thursday, Nov. 30. As these regulation changes were announced, Minnesota DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr reiterated the state’s commitment to rebuilding and sustaining a healthy walleye fishery in Mille Lacs Lake. “Improving the walleye population in Mille Lacs is a top priority for the DNR,” Landwehr said. “We deeply regret the hardships these new regulations will cause for anglers and business owners. But they are essential to protect and enhance the future of walleye fishing in the lake for future generations. We will continue doing everything we can to understand the challenges facing the walleye fishery, and take whatever actions we can to resolve this very difficult situation.” Landwehr and DNR fisheries chief Don Pereira noted that allowing for additional catch-and-release fishing in August is essential for area anglers, businesses, and Mille Lacs area communities. The decision to allow for this additional harvest was made with input from the Mille Lacs Fisheries Advisory Committee. “We want to allow as much walleye fishing on Mille Lacs as possible,” Pereira said. “So even though state anglers already have caught their quota of fish, the DNR will dip into the allowed conservation overage to reopen the season on Aug. 11.” Through the closure, anglers on Mille Lacs Lake may fish for all other species in the lake including bass, muskellunge and northern pike. When fishing for other species, only artificial baits and lures will be allowed in possession, except for anglers targeting northern pike or muskie, who may fish with sucker minnows longer than 8 inches. A prohibition on night fishing will remain in place from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. through Nov. 30. However, anglers may fish for muskie and northern pike at night, but may only use artificial lures longer than 8 inches or sucker minnows longer than 8 inches. Bowfishing for rough fish also is allowed at night but possession of angling equipment is not allowed and only rough fish may be in possession. Understanding walleye fishing quotas on Mille Lacs this year, and why that quota was reached earlier than predicted
      The DNR and the Chippewa bands that cooperatively manage Mille Lacs Lake agreed this year to harvest quotas of 44,800 pounds for state anglers and 19,200 pounds for tribal fishing. They also agreed that up to 75,000 pounds of walleye could be harvested from the lake from Dec. 1, 2016 to Nov. 30, 2017. That agreement allows the state to use a built-in buffer – the 11,000 pounds difference between the 75,000 pounds conservation cap and the 64,000 pounds combined harvest quotas – in an attempt to allow catch-and-release walleye fishing through Labor Day, following the mid-summer closure. Bi-weekly creel surveys show that state anglers already have reached their quota. “The DNR is using its full allotment to maximize opportunities to fish for walleye on Mille Lacs without violating our agreement,” Pereira said. “The DNR, just like area businesses, would greatly prefer to not have fishing restrictions in place. But sustaining and stabilizing Mille Lacs’ walleye population is our primary obligation and public responsibility.” Continuing the walleye fishing closure will reduce the number of fish that die after being caught and released, a condition known as hooking mortality. The likelihood of fish suffering hooking mortality increases as water temperatures warm. High walleye catch rates on Mille Lacs have increased DNR fishing projections. A hot walleye bite attracted more anglers to the lake, resulting in angler effort that is about double what it was in 2016. “Cooler than normal temperatures kept hooking mortality rates low, but more anglers fished Mille Lacs, particularly catching walleye longer than 20 inches,” Pereira said. “That increased the poundage of fish caught and put us over our walleye quota.” According to the DNR, bigger fish are biting, in part, because there is a shortage of food for larger walleye. Last fall’s assessment showed that larger walleye were thinner than average. Mille Lacs’ hot bite also reflects the findings of studies done in many other fisheries that show catchability actually increases when fish population drops. In Mille Lacs, walleye congregate in preferred spots rather than disperse evenly throughout the lake. Fewer fish in the lake means there is more room in the preferred spots for fish to gather, creating a situation where a larger percentage of the population is in position to be caught rather than gathering in a less preferred but less fished area. More information about Mille Lacs Lake, the regulation adjustments and management of the fishery is available on the DNR website at www.mndnr.gov/millelacslake. New solutions are being sought to improve and sustain a healthy walleye fishery
      The DNR announced in June that a new external review team of scientists will take a fresh look at Mille Lacs Lake’s walleye fishery, using all of the best science available to gain a better understanding of the lake. This new review, led by walleye expert Dr. Chris Vandergoot of the U.S. Geological Survey, will provide additional recommendations to improve fisheries management of the lake, and contribute to a long-term solution to improving and sustaining a healthy walleye fishery for future generations. The group’s report is expected in time to help guide and inform fisheries management decisions for the 2018 season. DNR encourages Minnesotans to fish for other abundant species on Mille Lacs Lake
      As today’s walleye fishing regulation changes were announced, the DNR encouraged all Minnesotans to visit Mille Lacs Lake to fish the other abundant species that the lake has to offer. Mille Lacs Lake’s other opportunities for top-notch fishing will not be affected by the regulation adjustment. Bassmaster Magazine named Mille Lacs the nation’s best bass lake in June and will send 50 of the country’s best anglers to the lake In September for its Angler of the Year tournament. Northern pike abound in Mille Lacs, along with muskellunge. In early July, a woman from southern Minnesota caught and released in Mille Lacs what may have been Minnesota’s largest-ever muskellunge. To learn more about Mille Lacs Lake and its many great fishing opportunities, visit the DNR website. To plan visit to the Mille Lacs area, visit the Mille Lacs Area Tourism Council website. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • Rick
      Q: What is happening with the walleye season this summer on Mille Lacs Lake? A: The closure that began July 8 and was set to end July 28 is being extended by two weeks. That means walleye fishing will reopen at 6:01 a.m. on Aug. 11 for catch-and-release only through Labor Day. A night fishing closure also will remain in place from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. through Nov. 30. Q: How does this affect fishing for other species? A: Fishing regulations for other species such as smallmouth bass, muskie and northern pike remain the same. During the night closure, there is an exception for muskie and northern pike anglers using artificial lures and sucker minnows longer than 8 inches. Q: Why did the DNR extend the closure? A: While the DNR wants to allow as much walleye fishing on Mille Lacs as possible, the state is also required to abide by cooperative agreements made with eight American Indian Chippewa bands. The two weeks of additional closure allows the state to abide by a harvest quota set earlier this year with the bands. The DNR and the bands agreed to harvest quotas of 44,800 pounds for state anglers and 19,200 pounds for tribal fishing. They also agreed that up to 75,000 pounds of walleye could be sustainably harvested from the lake from Dec. 1, 2016 to Nov. 30, 2017 in order to conserve the population That agreement allows the state to use a built-in buffer – the 11,000 pounds difference between the conservation cap of 75,000 pounds and the combined harvest quota of 64,000 pounds – in an attempt to allow catch-and-release walleye fishing through Labor Day, following the mid-summer closure. The latest creel survey data shows that state anglers reached their quota of 44,800 pounds of walleye caught from Mille Lacs in early July. Even though state anglers already have caught their quota of fish, the DNR is dipping into the allowed conservation reserve in order to reopen the season on Aug. 11. Q: Why has the walleye population in Mille Lacs declined? What is the DNR doing in the long-term to try to conserve the population? A: The vast majority of walleye that hatch do not survive to their third autumn in the lake. Walleye numbers have declined to the point that it has become important to protect spawning-sized walleye, particularly the class of walleye that hatched in 2013. It is important to protect the large 2013 year class to replenish aging spawning stock. Most males from the 2013 class are now mature, but females will not start to contribute in large numbers until next spring. The state is committed to conserving the population of walleyes born in 2013 to improve and rebuild a sustainable population for the future. Q: Why do we count hooking mortality during a closed walleye season? A: The amount that state anglers can kill (as spelled out in state-bands agreements) also must include fish that die as a result of hooking mortality, the fish that die after being caught and then released back into the water. During the closure, some anglers still catch walleye incidentally and some of those fish die after being released. Under the state-band agreements, those dead fish must be calculated and counted against the state’s allocation. Q: How did this cooperative management between the state and the bands of Mille Lacs Lake come to be? A: Recall that in 1999, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld lower-court decisions that allowed the Mille Lacs band and seven other Chippewa bands to exercise off-reservation fishing and hunting rights. The lower federal court also set up guidelines, known as stipulations and protocols, for both sides to follow. These stipulations and protocols provide a framework for how the bands and the state must work cooperatively to manage shared natural resources, including Mille Lacs fish. In their agreements, the DNR and the bands are required to annually establish the number of walleye that can safely be harvested from Mille Lacs while ensuring sufficient remaining walleye in the lake for a healthy fishery. Q: If the walleye population is in decline, why are anglers catching so many? A: Fish are biting for two reasons. First, there is a shortage of food for larger walleye. Last fall’s assessment showed that larger walleye were thinner than average. Second, studies in many fisheries show that catchability actually increases when fish population decline. In Mille Lacs, walleye congregate in preferred spots rather than disperse evenly throughout the lake. Fewer fish in the lake means there’s more room in the preferred spots for fish to gather, and anglers find these spots where they can catch a larger portion of fish. Finally, while the walleye population has decreased considerably (by half or more), the amount of fishing pressure has declined by a lot more. This means that there are more walleye per angler fishing Mille Lacs today. Q: How is the DNR using science and research to help the walleye population? A: Mille Lacs Lake is the most studied lake in Minnesota. It is also a complex and changing system. The agency conducts a large number of surveys on the lake annually. These surveys include assessing the abundance of young walleye; setting 52 nets to assess adult abundance; using fine-mesh nets each summer to determine abundance of food (prey fish) for walleye; and using interviews with anglers around the lake (called creel surveys) to estimate the number of fish anglers are catching. The DNR also periodically tags walleye and other species to provide actual population estimates. We are tagging bass this year in cooperation with angling groups, and will be tagging walleye in 2018 and 2019 when the 2013 year class will be reaching full maturity. Q: What is the purpose of the external review the DNR has initiated? A: The DNR has asked Dr. Chris Vandergoot to lead an independent review of the DNR’s scientific approaches to manage Mille Lacs Lake. Vandergoot is a key member of the international team that co-manages a very significant walleye fishery in Lake Erie. He works for the U.S. Geological Survey in the Sandusky Lake Erie Biological station in Ohio. His review report will be available to the public in early 2018 and will help inform fisheries management decisions for the 2018 season. Q: What does the future look like for Mille Lacs walleye? A: It is unlikely that Mille Lacs walleye production will return to the levels that state anglers enjoyed over 20 years ago. The ecosystem of Mille Lacs is going through extreme change, starting with increased water clarity in the mid-1990s, to impacts today from aquatic invasive species such as spiny water flea and zebra mussels. Longer growing seasons are also helping some species such as smallmouth bass but may be hurting others. While walleye will still be abundant, the future fishery will be more diverse, offering angling opportunities for a greater variety of fish. Discuss below - to view set the hook here.
    • bucketmouth64
      Thanks for the suggestions. I believe I'll be going with the 150 hp. My next question is trolling motor, 24/36 volt? I have a 24 volt now with a MK maxxum. I would like to get the MK Ultrex, but that has a 80lb thrust and the 36 volt comes at 112 lb. Is there a noticeable difference between the two? I noticed they come in ipilot and ipilot link. What's the difference? Not sure if I would utilize ipilot since I don't walleye fish. I use the trolling motor a lot while fishing.
    • guideman
      Maybe you need some new spots. Raised 9 fish last night in 3 hours. Hooked two boated one.   "Ace" "It's just fishing man"
    • ANYFISH2
      7/19 Day 5   Day 5 was spent celebrating my Isaacs 11th birthday!  Lots of cake and catering to him.  The exciting typical swimmimg and paddling ruled the day.  Grandma and grandpa DeZurik came up to celebrate his birthday as well.  Always nice to get both sets of grandparents together at the same time.   Fishing continued slow even more.  Still a successful night though. The birthday boy conceded his seat in the boat so grandma and grandpa cpuld join me for the evening fish trip.  My folks in all truth haven't been fishing for 2 years or more.  It was just nice to get them in the boat.   I struggled as the acting to put them on a consistent bite.  Mom as able to scratch out the biggest walleye at 17".  Dad brought home the honors of most fish caught landing a 14" and 15" walleye, 8.5" bluegill, and 2 perch as big aa his leech! I mustered up 1 small pumpkinseed.
    • ANYFISH2
      no doubt aboit the hooks, they are lottle stickers.
    • DLD24
      I like drifting with them and snap jigging them with a controlled fall...Almost every time you'll feel that tick just as it's hitting bottom... Last time I was on mille lacs that's all I could get them to go on. As far as colors I'd just match the forage Tullies in the lake use blue,purples,silvers....Perch use perch colors.. I think the jiggin rap is my new favorite way to fish, but it gets scary with them little hooks when you got a big eye on lol.