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toddb

good and bad day on the pond

15 posts in this topic

Yesterday was one of the nicest days of the year to be on the pond. Pulled a couple big ones and fairly steady action. One side note- we had a 29.5" go belly up on us yesterday. It was a hard fighting fish and it went back fine after a couple pics. We found her struggling on the surface about 20 minutes later. I try to think that we did a good job at getting her back asap, but with the warm water temps and the fight/ handling stress was just too much for her. Please try to minimize time out of the water if you can.

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Todd what depth were you in gong to be heading up there on wensday and have no idea where to find them at this time of the year usually get up there early spring.

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Pulling fish out of deep water with down riggers is hard on them..........I was out there today and seen a good number of fish on the surface, not blaming down riggers for all of them, but if I were a betting man, I would say a good portion of them met there match becuase of downrigging.........

Bucks-n-ducks

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B&D- FYI, I wasn't downrigging when the fish in question went belly up. As far as floaters, I saw enough on last Friday also. As far as which technique is to blame, I don't think you can blame it on any single fishing technique. It may play a part, but it is not the deciding factor, as successful releases are obtainable with all techniques used. One thing I have seen on a several occasions the last couple weeks is some very poor handling of fish (one on Arnesens Reef on Friday was absolutely ridiculous). I could be specific right down to the boats in question, but that is not why I posted the fact that I had a fish go belly up. I just wanted to raise the awareness to the fact that excessive handling does play a part in the mortality (IMO the greatest part). I know I'm not perfect in everything I do when I'm on the water, nor do I expect everyone else to be. I just wanted to put out a little bug that you might not need hold a fish vertically above your head for 30 seconds so everyone on the reef can see it, take pictures, then throw it back in the net hoping it would revive and go back sucessfully. Deep water, warm water, and hooking will kill fish, its a fact of life. I just wan't to try to minimize. Sorry for the rant.

later,

toddb

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Well Said!!

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Quote:

Yesterday was one of the nicest days of the year to be on the pond. Pulled a couple big ones and fairly steady action. One side note- we had a 29.5" go belly up on us yesterday. It was a hard fighting fish and it went back fine after a couple pics. We found her struggling on the surface about 20 minutes later. I try to think that we did a good job at getting her back asap, but with the warm water temps and the fight/ handling stress was just too much for her. Please try to minimize time out of the water if you can.

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DSC00135.jpg


Regardless, nice walleye. What were you using for bait??

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patrat,

You can find fish anywhere from the tops of the reefs to out on the flats surrounding them. I am not a live bait guy so I can't give you any specifics, but the bait guys have been pounding them pretty good on the rocks. My best luck has been 28' to 34'. We got the 2 picture fish in the same general area and depth along with a couple other smaller fish in the span of an hour the other day but that spot faded fast, much like all the other times this year when you think you have them pinned down. Last couple trips I have found fish very scattered and more out deeper than past trips. Usually there are some fish in all areas with some days having them more concentrated in specific depth/structure locations. You just have to find a school and start catching them. Right now it seems that the community spots are being pounded pretty good. Did get a report from a buddy that it was tough fishing this weekend, but I don't know if it was the fish or the fishermen who were the problem tongue.gif. I will find out tomorrow firsthand if the bite is still on.

later,

toddb

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capn,

800 reef runners

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We to were out where Todd was And we too had a fish roll over on us as well we re-captured her and swished her back and forth back and forth until she swam off on her own...we were lucky she was 26 inches not legal to keep. I have to say we catch dozens of these big fish every year and when the water is warm you have to be dilligent about how you bring the fish to the boat and how long you handle it or you will kill it. frown.gif

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Quote:

We to were out where Todd was And we too had a fish roll over on us as well we re-captured her and swished her back and forth back and forth until she swam off on her own...we were lucky she was 26 inches not legal to keep. I have to say we catch dozens of these big fish every year and when the water is warm you have to be dilligent about how you bring the fish to the boat and how long you handle it or you will kill it.
frown.gif


When you say dilligent about how you bring them you to boat you are talking slow and easy right?? Then get them back in the water asap.

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Bandit,

How would you do it, lets say if you were fishing 25-35 FOW using live bait, downrigging, longlining cranks, or pulling leadcore? I'm always looking for tips from experts.

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First of all if you are looking for input from an expert, your talking to the wrong guy. I do fish with all the methods you mentioned. It seems to me that if you want to release a fish, large or small, that you should try to bring them up slow so the pressure and temp change affects them as little as possible. On the other hand I don't think a person should keep them on the line until they are exhausted. I guess I try to bring them up slow, and once they are up, get them in and out of the boat as fast as I can. I usually don't take any fish home with me so I try my best to keep them in good shape so they can be caught again. Maybe I am going about this all wrong, I guess I have never talked to anybody about the best way to bring these deep fish up. I would be happy to hear what you guys think.

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To me there is no perfect answer. Each technique is so different. Most of the time, you will fight the fish the way the fish wants(needs)to be fought, or you will lose it. Small fish are the exception. Even when they come from the depths, I have rarely seen air bladders popping out of a fishes gullet in the summer, like you do sometimes with small fish in the winter out of deeper water. As far as the fight, I like to try to keep even pressure during the fight. To much or too little and you will lose alot if fish. The bigger ones will almost always let you know how fast you can bring em in. I am by no means an expert in this area and hate to admit it, but I have released some fish that didn't make it. I'm sure more than I personally care to believe. I don't know if any particular studies have been done in this area, and if it would make a difference. Would be a tough one to accomplish with any degree of accuracy. I do know one thing that works for sure, that the quickest release possible greatly increases the chance that the fish will be caught again.

later,

toddb

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One thing that has bothered me is the fish that went over on us, and then recaptured, and then revived a second time...does that fish roll over a few minutes later? after we have moved on trolling? I really want to think they are fine, and they survive. but when I hear guys saying they are seeing floaters it really bothers me! frown.gif

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I think alot of it depends on the fish. A couple of us fish a tourny at mobridge every year and we always have at least one fish go belly up on us right after he is put in the box, No extra handling, no bad hooks, the other eyes swim in there all day without a problem. This year the first fish [19" out of 8 fow] was put in the box at 7:30 and was belly up in 15 min. The other 7 eyes will be bigger next year. I have like a 45 gal live well, I just don't get it.

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