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crop

Muskies

35 posts in this topic

Hey looking to see if anybody is having any luck on the muskie hunting.

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Water temps are in the 80's please fish for something else for a while till the water temp goes down. Mortality is almost certain in these high water temps.

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No thanks

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good comeback crop!

Try at night, after sunset and reeeeaaaal early in the morning. smirk.gif

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Boy i do not know where the Muskies dissapeared to on this lake but it is really bad the last couple of years.

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The high water temps that we're seeing right now are not good for healthy releases. For the good of our resources, I wish more people would take Pistol Pete's advice. None of us are going to lose any sleep over putting the musky gear away for a week or two a year. Luckily, that's all we typically have to do here in MN.

States in the southern part of the country see water temps this high for 3+ months a year. That's why not many people musky fish in those states in the summer months. Because we don't see water temps this high every year, we aren't educated on the dangers to high water temps like those that live in the southern states.

Although I don't enjoy not having the option to musky fish. That's what these water temps do to my fishing. And I'm more than happy to fish for bass or something else for a week or two, knowing that I'll still be able to catch those fish when the water cools. If I go out now and stress out a musky due to the conditions, chances are much higher that I'll have a dead fish on my hands. Dead fish equals no chance to catch that fish again.

Everyone has the right to fish for muskies if they want right now, the season isn't closed. But depending on the conditions of the lake you're on, please consider what's best for the resource.

Aaron

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That is correct but they still have to eat by catching them with high temps does not mean that we are going to kill them. If you guys have a problem with other people fishing for them maybe you should be a part of the PETA orginization. We all have a right to fish for them without other people complaning about it.

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Crop, the part that hurts is that a bunch of us have fought a battle with a bunch of guys called "no more muskies". Stocking programs were cut on Miltona because of this group. It is not the fishery it once was. And now one of our own does not care, or seems to not care much if a fish dies because of high water temps and the greatly increased, and I do mean greatly increased mortality rates. Some of us are just more passionate about what we do and how we do it. Do not throw crap in our face about peta. Nothing could be further from the truth. We are just concerned about the musky fishery and how to inprove it. I did not like it when they changed the law to close the muskie season Dec 1st. I didn't see you gripe about that. I did but then got some information about why. Now I understand why and I'm ok with it. No one here is saying you can't fish, we were asking people do help the muskie fishery out by giving the fish a break for a couple of weeks. For all the enjoyment I get out of catching them that's not to much to ask. Just my opinion, and you are entitled to yours.

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Crop,

As I mentioned in my previous post, everyone has the right to fish for muskies right now no matter what the water temps. When we only have 6 months to target muskies, sometimes it’s hard to put the gear down when we have the opportunity to fish for them. I get that. But…we also have to consider what’s best for the resource if we care about the future.

Let me ask you this, what are your intentions when you go musky fishing? Are your intentions to release the muskies that you catch? If so, why? So that they can live? I’m not being sarcastic with these questions. I think sometimes we have to step back and think about what we are doing and what our intentions are. If I am go fishing and know that the fish that I release are going to have a far greater chance to die due to high water temps, it’s time to step back and reconsider what I’m doing. You are right when you say that just because you fish for them in high water temps doesn’t mean you’re going to kill them. But why would you want to so dramatically increase the odds of a dead fish when our musky fisheries can be as fragile as they are if we don’t take care of them.

I equate this debate to the sucker fishing debate. Quick strike rigs or single hook swallow rigs? You pretty much can’t find a single hook swallow rig on store shelves anymore. This is a great thing! Using swallow rigs doesn’t mean you are going to kill the fish, but chances are so much greater than a quick strike rig that people just don’t use them anymore. Why? For the good of the resource.

This isn’t a matter of just wanting people to stay off the water to make it less pressured. This is about how detrimental musky fishing can be to the resource during abnormally high water temps. This is a real concern. Muskies exist in very low densities the way it is. This is a huge reason why they are so difficult to catch. You have expressed these frustrations in this thread about not being able to catch them. By fishing for them in these conditions and dramatically increasing the odds of delayed mortality if we do hook into one, we are our own worst enemy.

Minnesota has a lot of out of state guides in the summer. Lots of them from Illinois, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana. Talk to some of them and ask them why they don’t fish their home waters during June, July and August.

As mentioned, it’s everyone’s right to fish for muskies in these high water temps. But let’s not take our resources for granted. Let’s do our part to take care of them. If you’re going to fish for them in these conditions, consider fishing at night when water temps are at their coolest and consider water releases only, no need for a photo. The odds of delayed mortality are still higher under these circumstances than they would be if we wait for the water to cool. But if you must fish for them, this can help.

Aaron

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I couldnt agree more. the fish do have a way higher deathrate. Crop you dont bite the hand that feeds you so why mabey kill a fish that you or somebody else could have the chance to catch again.

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This is a really tough argument to take sides on. I am embarrassed to say that I have truly only fished for muskies once this year.

Having said that, I have a hard time telling someone what they can and cannot fish for and when.

No offense, but because of responses like this musky anglers in general get the perception of elitists and how they are better than anyone else.

Is this warm water any easier on any other fish? Hardly. Why promote not fishing for muskies when the same could be said for walleyes etc? To me that is hypocritical.

I think musky anglers in general are the most conservation and educated of them all. We do more to promote our sport than anyone else, the last thing we want to do is alienate anyone because they get a handful of times to fish a year and it just happens to be when the water is warmer than optimum.

I worry more about people handling fish with inferior equipment than someone who has proper equipment handling a fish in 80 degree water.

I think successful releases can be the norm with short battles with the fish, water releases, no photos and NOT TROLLING!

As musky anglers we need everyone to be advocates for the sport, let's not alienate someone because of when they get an opportunity to fish.

Enough with the rant. I think everyone's heart is in the right place, but I don't think everyone needs to be preached to when asking for information about how to find fish or something.

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CaptainMusky,

Good points and I agree completely with everything except for one point. I do believe that muskies are more fragile than most, if not all other game fish species in MN when water temps get this warm. I think any fish is fragile if you're taking them out of deep water (not necessarily over deep water, but deep in the water column), especially now when water temps are as high as they are.

But if you're fishing for shallow water fish, I have never had a walleye, bass or pike that struggled to be released when fishing in very warm water. Maybe it's just that they "appear" to be more resiliant? Not sure. But I've seen many muskies take much longer to release in these types of temps and you sure see a lot more floaters in these conditions as well.

I don't think anyone is trying to jump down anyone's throat here by telling them they can't fish. Personally, I just think it's a very important subject for people to be educated on. Ten years ago, I would have been out there pounding the water from sun up 'til sun down in these kinds of conditions. I had no idea of the potential problems that there might be when fishing muskies in high water temps. I wish someone would have told me back then what I've learned over the years. Luckily, I was never very successful catching muskies in the heat of the summer back then!

Aaron

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What water temps are considered dangerous? Water over 75, 80, 85??? I haven't been up to Alex in over a month so I'm not up to speed on the current water temps. Is the water too warm right now? With an incredibly warm summer, like this year, there is a good chance you will have 2 months of very warm water, not just two weeks like someone stated earlier. When can we get back out there with a reasonable chance that the fish will make it?

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The water temps on Miltona were high 70's to low 80's when i was out there last week. these are to what are considered dangerous temps. They say low to mid 70's preferably lower 70's before you're not putting tremendous stress on the fish. I haven't been on Lobster lately to say what the temps are out there, anyone know about Lobster?

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If Miltona is that high Lobster will be as high or higher. Reason being that it is not as deep and the wind can not stir it up as much. Smaller bays that really heat up, just like in the spring time. Smaller lakes heat up quicker.

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I believe everything you said but the problem with not sucessfully releasing a muskie is the stocking program. They are not releasing as many fish if any in these lakes anymore because of all the bickering going on that they are hard or they ruin the lake. We got to preserve what we have and not hurt them. We have are future to think about.

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Always wondered about the NO TROLLING thing...What is it about trolling that makes it so taboo with Musky fisherman?

I personally have no education on this so I'm not on one side or the other. Just looking for wisdom. What's bad about trolling?

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Quote:

Water temps are in the 80's please fish for something else for a while till the water temp goes down. Mortality is almost certain in these high water temps.


Definately not the way to get someone to lay off 'em for awhile.

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Trolling on Miltona is very good i have had good luck trolling over the deep water following the bait fish i am trying it this weekend and hope to catch a trophy. i will let you know how i did.

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Quote:

Always wondered about the NO TROLLING thing...What is it about trolling that makes it so taboo with Musky fisherman?

I personally have no education on this so I'm not on one side or the other. Just looking for wisdom. What's bad about trolling?


I don't see trolling as taboo, just when the water is this warm. When you are trolling at 5mph and a fish hits a lure and gets hooked the boat keeps moving essentially pulling the fish along. This essentially drowns the fish. The postman on Mille Lacs is known for this, he won't even slow the boat down for fear of "tangling the lines".

I think everyone here is genuinely concerned about the well being of muskies. My only frustration was that a guy asked a question, it was never even answered just people started preaching to him about not fishing because of the heat.

I don't think anyone would argue that heat is an enemy here, but that isn't what was asked.

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Im lucky if I can get out to fish muskies 5 times a year, and really lucky if I catch one. Im gonna do it when ever the heck I get the chance. If its so bad for the fish why dont they close the season? I still take the best care possible of the fish, but I wanna catch one!?!

I am a stong supporter of Quality Deer Management, and I HATE mad.gif when hunters shoot little, young bucks! But they bought a license..... They can kill what they want! Have any of you on this site killed a small buck? If you have then I dont like it! But its the same deall as this muskie thing... all you can do is your best to educate people and try to persuade them to feel the same as you. BUT They are not breaking any laws, just trying to enjoy their free time doing what they love.

Good luck crop! wink.gifand please dont kill any little bucks this fall or ill may have to write a bunch of "hate mail"! grin.gif

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Quote:

If its so bad for the fish why dont they close the season?


Not really a viable option in Minnesota. Some years we never see water temps this high. When we do, it’s typically for only a short period (a week or two). Some years it might be in early July, others in mid August. Some lakes might be considered to be “too warm” while another down the road has cooler temps that are considered to be more suitable. So a closed season? I don’t think you would find anyone in favor of that, including people like myself that simply want to educate people on the subject.

As you said, no one is breaking any laws. That’s not where anyone has issues. Personally, I think education is a huge issue. Some people simply don’t know. How can anyone fault that person? As responsible sportsmen, it’s our job to help educate others when we care about our resources. It’s not a matter of wanting to make someone feel like I do. I simply want people to be educated. If someone knows and understands the dangers of musky fishing in high water temps, that’s all I ask for. It’s their decision what to do from there.

What bothers me and others is when you try to educate someone on something (whether it’s this topic or anything else), and you get a response that is basically one of “who cares?” or “not true”.

Some people choose not to fish in high water temps. Some people choose to fish. Neither choice makes one person better than the other. I completely understand that when you finally have the chance to get out, you’re going to take advantage of it. Some people plan a vacation months in advance. Does anyone expect them to cancel their vacation or maybe a reservation at a resort because of high water temps? Doubtful.

The only thing I ask is that people be willing to be educated, no matter what the subject. What you do with that education is up to you.

Aaron

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Well said AWH. I never told anybody to quit fishing. I asked them if they could hold off. Sometimes you just can't. I go on vacation in a couple weeks and hope the water is cooled off by them. Just help that fish out by a water release if you can. Ya, they don't quite look as nice as holding them up but better than a floater. Does look as though the weather is not going to get so hot. Hope for a good rain and things will cool down a lot.

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This evening I came across a freshly dead 45" muskie on Miltona. I think this may hammer home the point about stress.

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Quote:

What bothers me and others is when you try to educate someone on something (whether it’s this topic or anything else), and you get a response that is basically one of “who cares?” or “not true”.


Aaron, I don't think anyone here disagrees with you. What bothers me is when someone asks a question, then someone proceeds to "educate" them and not even address what the original question was.

I think everyone knows what high water temps can do, it isn't rocket science, but we don't have to preach to everyone as if they didn't know. That's what gets frustrating.

I find it funny that you mentioned Southern lakes like in Kentucky. Where do you suppose all those guides spend the rest of their time? MILLE LACS. The water there is 80 degrees right now. Do you see them packing up and leaving? Heck no. They are out there fishing right now, making big bucks and then head back home in the Fall. They care enough about "their" fish to not fish them in high water temps, yet they come up here and do exactly what they are against in their home state? Hypocracy.

I am NOT discounting what you guys have been saying about the heat's effect on fish. I just don't agree with the methods for bringing them up. If you take this as "don't care" or "not true" you couldn't be farther from the truth.

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