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Anylakeanytime

We could just as well put a name to them?

38 posts in this topic

Alright, I really don't have a problem with people crashing into "my" fishing spots, I don't own the lake or the spot and I acknowledge that. But after the worse experience I have had (see below for the hunker down and avoid eye contact guy), I figured we might as well put a name to them. The following is a list and a brief explanation of fishing spot "crashers". This is solely for humor purposes so be sure to include a name and brief explanation if I have missed any.

THE BOUY CRASHER:

This, the most common species of all types of crashers, is particularly keen on noticing where bouys are located and once a bouy has been located, they have absolutely no quams about fishing as close as they can get to the thrown bouy. In some instances they have even been known to make the party that has thrown the bouy to relocate as they often become a navigational hazard.

THE DINE AND DASHER:

Although this is a close relative of the bouy crasher, this sub species has common knowledge of the etiquette of fishing and will not comlpetely take over the bouy designated location. Rather, this species will wait until the bouy throwing party is particularly far away from their bouy and will make a quick pass through the bouy location in hopes of not being noticed by the bouy throwing party. If successfully landing a fish in the bouy designated location, they will repeat this course of action throughout the day.

THE AGRESSIVE TROLLER:

In situations where there is not a bouy in the water (as is usually the case with modern day electronics.... that is GPS), the next species keeps a watchful eye out for rod bending and especially for netting activity. Once it has been established that the landed fish has gone in the livewell, this species changes their course of trolling and aggressively trolls toward the landed fish location only to slow down (and in some incredibly annoying circumstances drop anchor) when directly over the hot spot.

THE TAILGATOR:

Although much less common than the others, this sly creature has a keen eye for those that are catching fish and once they have established their prey, they follow them throughout the day. Gradually getting closer and closer as to get a peek at the successful anglers presentation and baiting method.

THE HUNKER DOWN AND AVIOD EYE CONTACT GUY:

This is a rare species and luckily so, as it the most most invasive species known to man. This species falls under the bouy crasher speices, but it is much more invasive than them. Once this species has located a bouy, they attempt to get as close to the bouy as possible (typically within 10 yards) and drop their anchor. The successful species in this category even make it near impossible for the bouy throwing party to fish the spot they have marked. In such circumstances the bouy throwing party often becomes rightfully disturbed and will likely get over their anger quickly so long as they are able to communicate to the bouy crasher/anchorer that they are disturbed. But, this is where the second half of their name comes in, once they have hunkered down this rare breed avoids eye contact by all means necessary and especially when the bouy throwing party attempts to retrieve their bouy without hitting their boat.

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The bouy crasher/ hey thats my bouy guy.

This much less common subspecies of the bouy crasher acts exactly like the bouy crasher but when the bouy owner comes back to retreive said bouy this unbeleivably clueless species will actually tell the bouy owner that the bouy is his own sometimes even when confronted with the owners name written on the bouy.

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I don't have a name for them, but I can practically bet my life that on any day on the water during summer at least one guy in a boat will come amazingly close to me while I'm clearly fishing. A couple of weeks ago I was fly fishing for bluegills while wading and at one point eight boats had moved to within 100 feet of me in a 400 acre lake with only about 12 boats on it. Last month I was clearly fishing, standing in my boat, and a boat full of guys trolled within four, yes FOUR, feet, yes FEET. I could have easily stepped into their boat.

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The Striped Whistler: The guy that has to do a complete circle around your boat to see if you have water flowing from your live well. Probably the same ones that used to circle your boat to see if you had a stringer hanging out.

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Dude!

Three letters: GPS

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You know, as I'm reading this thread (since I don't like people crowding someone while fisihing I was naturally interested), it occured to me that this whole concept of throwing out a bouy and expecting people to stay away from it, is just as obnoxious. Why should you be able to claim an area of public water just by throwing out a bouy? If someone is fishing "your area" when you come back to your bouy, that's your own fault for marking the spot for them and then leaving it.

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Good point there Lawdog. I agree.

Marking is ok.

Claiming is not.

I really feel bad when I throw out a marker and it ends up being the navigational point for all boat traffic going on and off the lake -- those things are like boat MAGNETS!

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I have found the best way is mark an "X" on the side of the boat where the fish have been caught. Nobody else can find that spot again, only me. Is it selfish of me to continue with this practice?

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the pole bender

these selectivly social creatures tend to only be seen on memorial, fourth of july, and labor day weekends. while quiet the rest of the year they will loudly announce their presence with a brightly colored cooler, loud radio, and build a shinny structure from empty cans. you can see them comming by the rods constantly doubled over while in storage. often the hook at the end of a steel leader will be in the securely place in the nearest guide, leaving the red and white softball sized bobber, secured on the original 10 pound test, to dance on every bump hit. the mode of transportaion is usually a four door sedan, often times a model no longer made. a cavalier or celebrity, or in the case of over reproduction, a chevy asto or ford aerostar will work. either case, it will be rusty. they are easily tracked as they tend to leave a trail of empty bait containers, snelled hook packages, and beverage cans wherever they go

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LOL That's pretty good! Over reproduction is a problem for some...

Back to the bouys. On the lake I normally fish there are maybe 4 to 5 hot spots. Now depending on time of year and wind direction, that really narrows down the choices. A couple of gentleman were fishing for panfish about 75-100 yards from where I wanted to fish. I've dropped my camera down and found some structure in a tight area that produces walleyes when conditions are correct. Initially I intentionally avoided that area as I saw they were there. But after trying other spots for 2 hours or so I used my GPS to bring me to the exact spot I wanted to fish. I came in slow, dropped the electric to be quiet and dropped anchor on the far side of them.

If looks could kill, I would have been dead. They lasted two minutes, made some comments to each other, and gruffly left for home. People do need to lighten up a little bit out there and remember we are all just trying to enjoy ourselves. In this case they was no bouy, but clearly they felt ownership of that area. Apparently they felt that this ownership extended to the entire evening. What are you going to do?

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I'm from the old school before GPS when you had to line up landmarks to find your spot again, and it's amazing how often there are boats on "my" spots now. I know these guys aren't looking at shore to find their spots. Fishing hasn't changed a lot in the last 20 years, but fisherman sure have.

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C,mon guys public water is public water.

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good stuff

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That does not address why someone should park on top of someone else? It can even be a safety hazard being that close. If someone is fishing a spot and they got there before you then give them room! (public water or not!) Perhaps someone is fishing to get a little break away from the grind. Give them room.

Keith, if a couple has a blanket stretched out at a park for a little "relaxing" time. They are the only ones in the park besides you. Would you open your picnic basket 10 feet away from them?

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This is a touchy subject. I was annoyed a couple weeks ago when a bass boat crowded my 10 year old's canoe, they caught a fish right next too him. I was watching from shore. They could've cast into his canoe. Later they came back and threw some casts under the dock the other kids were fishing on. I know docks are public fishing spots, but the kids were there...give'em some space.

On the other hand, if a lake has one small reef, and you throw out a buoy, is it yours even if everybody has known about it for decades? How many boats fit there is a matter of opinion: 1, 2-3, 4-5? Someone who fishes in Canada, use to having the whole lake to themself would say you're crowding him. Someone who fishes Mille Lacs on opening day might tell you 6 boats could fish there.

This will always be a source of conflict.

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9Note from Admin, Please read forum policy before posting again, Thank-You.)

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Lawdog:

Ha! Ha! Ha! Your comment about the markers really strikes a chord with me. I too have found that markers are boat magnets. One thing about putting out markers is that if you do it, others should realize you'll probably be back soon. So why go near it? I put markers out to give me visual references for trolling not to mark a productive spot. I'll put out a line of markers and then troll in their vicinity. It's amazing how often people go to them. Last week a guy even trolled along my line of markers. That, of course, was OK with me. He didn't affect me a bit and I don't begrudge anyone from using my markers as references.

One of these days I just might put out a marker on a really nasty piece of shallow hump that's designed by nature to wreck lower units. Tee hee! Or maybe mark some spots that are in about five inches of water. Or just put a marker out in the middle of the lake at no particular spot. I bet any of those will draw boats.

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When trolling plugs on the Oahe I get hung up in a submerged tree once in a while. After I retrieve my lure I put out a marker so I can avoid the tree on the next pass. It's amazing how many people pull in on the marker and get hung up in the tree. Kinda fun to watch though.

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I had this happen to me this spring and early summer by the same person over and over again. There was a guy on shore geared up with a spotting-scope and a cell-phone up as soon as we would pull up to our spot around 4:30a.m.. There he would be watching us with his kitchen light on. As soon as his neighbor would crawl out of bed, he would get a call on his cell-phone while on his way out to "join" us instructing him of what we had pulled up so far, ect. More than enough times he was within feet of our boat. I finally decided the next time he gets so close I will just tell him to bring his boat back to shore and just hop in with me. mad.gif Over the whole spring/summer we probly boated 200-250 eye's. They caught a whopping 2! grin.gif So I guess what comes around goes around. smirk.gif

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Funny topic! I love buoys! I can't believe how FAR away they can be seen.. just amazing.. and really helpful... and hurtful at the same time!

I only use them when the lake is devoid of traffic. I plan on making some of the stealth ones one of these days.. film cans.. black... etc.... smile.gif But my GPS works pretty darn good too when there's a whole lot of people around.

I myself NEVER go near buoys.. I try to respect someones space.. there is SO much space out there.. even on a crowded day... and I have enough skill to find my own fish.

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In the spirit of recycling, use empty detergent bottles as a "sucker" marker. You mark a spot that is a considerable distance from any descent fishing. The benefit of this approach is three fold: 1 - The detergent bottle is highly visible from a distance. 2 - It will draw most every sub species of the "hole hogger" family to a spot out of your way. 3 - If one of the members of these deviant subcultures steals this marker, you really aren't out anything. You may want to keep this with-in your sight just to watch how many suckers will decoy!

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I think I am "skill" challenged so I sometimes use someone else's marker.

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Quote:

I plan on making some of the stealth ones one of these days.. film cans.. black... etc....
smile.gif


I've told this once before, but several years ago on Mille Lacs we threw out the stealth black buoy in no-mans land and it was so stealthy when we drifed away from it we couldn't find it again. grin.gifgrin.gifgrin.gif The hilarious part came the next day when we went back out to the general area and there was 13-14 boats out there and lo and behold they were all fishing around a black bouy in the middle of no where! shocked.gif I still laugh about that to this day.

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Law D

I don't disagree with the premise of your comment as the lake is public water, but I always keep on moving if a spot is occupied by another fisherman. I think its the courteous and ethical thing to do.

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Ha Ha!

But what the confused.gifconfused.gifconfused.gif is a guy supposed to do?????

Opening weekend we fished a group of 16 boats on one point that had 3 spots on the spot. Hardly 150 yards of contour around it.

Last weekend, different lake but same area, hardly 6 boats on the lake but 4 decided they wanted to fish the same 200 yards. Coincidently the weather and seasonal pattern pointed to that being the most likely spot to get bit.

So we weren't the first boat in either spot or the last one. With 16 boats nobody gave a rip as people came and went. Most people were catching some too. With 4 boats in a bigger spot and not much biting, the tension was thicker.

Its gotta be a mood thing.

I'm not saying if there were any bouys out or not because that shouldn't matter. They're a personal reference aid. If they show ownership, then I'm gonna dump all mine at the access so I get the whole lake to myself! grin.gifgrin.gif

Just be quiet or maybe even ask if you're getting too close. It could help.

Lable this: Euphorian

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