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Lip'em

7-5-07 Report

8 posts in this topic

Started the day out on the north end Mud flats (6:00am). Caught one fish at about 9:30 (24"). Decided to make the trek to 7 mile where we had some success last week. The first hour of being there we watched one boat catch all the walleyes with everyone watching in amazement. The lake at this time was almost dead calm.

After being there a while the wind all of the sudden really started to blow. This little change of wind caused the walleyes to go from somewhat inactive to strapping on the feedbags and pretty soon everyone was catching walleyes. I have never seen such a suttle change in the weather affect fishing success in such a small time period; all we need was a little wind.

Ended up with about a dozen or so walleyes; 2 eaters with rest being your cookie cutter 22-24" Mille Lacs walleyes. A slow day turned into a great day on the water in a matter of minutes! Can't wait to come up again...in fact...it's all I can seem to think about...maybe I need a shrink who specializes in Mille Lacs fever.

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There's no cure for that. I'm the same way when I driving home from a day fishing up there. Always thinking how soon I can get back up there.

I have been on the lake many times either when the wind dies down, and the fish slow down, or the experience you had.

Sometimes when the wind kicks up, spinners turn them on also.

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We had a similar experience yesterday. Things were real slow until we found the combo the walleyes were looking for. Unfortunately we had to leave at 3:00 when the wind started to pick up again. Sounds like we missed the prime time. I can't wait to get back out there.

Witnessed a guy being towed back in from 8 mile flat too. A good samaritan in a Crestliner with a Yamaha volunteered.

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What time of the day were you at 7 Mile? We arrived there around 2pm. Had what felt like a good size walleye break my line just as the sinker was surfacing, but after that we only had some short biters that just wouldn't cooperate....

We were using 8-10' leaders with a red hook, and a chartruse bead, and a leach. My father-in-law tried the same combo with a crawler with no success. We drifted the west side of 7 mile, and worked the entire circumference of the flat. We talked to some other guys at the landing last eve. and they were using 14' leaders with chartruse, and orange hooks, and crawlers. They said they did well.

I guess I was so busy trying to keep the boat on the break, as well as navigating around everyone else that I didn't consider trying another color combination. Ah, the good ole' finicky walleye!!!! I'll have to store this one in the memory bank for future use!

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I would like to see how people land fish using 14' snells???

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Quote:

I would like to see how people land fish using 14' snells???


Long rods and a long net handle. But realy you dont need anything over 10feet.

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My wife and I were at the lake for the last 3 days. We didn't hit the mud till 11am every day and still caught fish. 14 over 20" and several slots. The big ones came on large chart. spinners and crawlers, slots came on lead with with blue shad raps. largest 27,26,2-25,5-24,5-22 These all came from the same flat. Most of the time we were the only boat there.

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We had a pretty good bite on Thursday. We started on the SE corner of Sherman's where we landed 6 fish (two were under the slot). Then about 9 we moved out to 7 mile and had consistent bite until we left. We had a 30 fish day and brought 9 nice eaters home. We were long lining, but we had different colors (orange w/orange bead, chart. w/chart. bead & red w/red bead). Nightcrawlers were the ticket.

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