Guests - If You want access to member only forums on FM. You will gain access only when you Sign-in or Sign-Up on Fishing Minnesota.

It's easy - LOOK UPPER right menu.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
baldav

leak in aluminum boat

13 posts in this topic

I noticed my bildge pump working overtime last weekend and rightly assumed that I had a leak in my lund rebel. When I returned home i filled my boat with water and noticed a slow drip coming from 1 or 2 rivets near the bow.

Couple of questions for forum members:

1)While in the water last weekend, it seemed that my boat filled with water much more quickly then one would expect based on slow drip I observed while the boat was out of the water. Does this seem reasonable or should I be looking for another source for the leak?

2)If it is just the rivets, how much can I expect to pay to have a few rivets replaced?

3) Is it possible to weld the rivets myself with a propane torch and durafix? If so, what kind of consideration do I need to take into account when heating an aluminum boat with a propane torch?

Thanks for all your help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fixed a dozen leaks in my old lund boat before i sold it.Go to your local fleet store and get some 3/16 x 3/8 or 1/2 aluminum rivets and a 3/16 drill bit and carefully drill the leaky ones out and replace with new rivets.The center hole in the new rivets you can just fill with a little caulk or you could go to a boat dealer and get the rivets that are like a hat and leave no hole.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes thats probably your leak. Water has much more force being pushed up into the boat than water in the boat has dripping out. Its not a hard fix and the cost at a shop should be less than 100 dollars. If you attempt the repair yourself, don't drill those old rivets out as someone suggested. Better to chisel the head off and then punch them through. Oversized holes from drilling are good candidtes to be leakers. Then get the correct solid rivets from a boat shop and install them. You will need an air hammer with a correct head for the rivets and a bucking bar to hold against them. Its a two person job. Pop rivets arent strong enough and just installing pop rivets with caulk is sure to result in leaks in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just gooped up any leakers with silicone. Worked like a charm. If it happens again, i'll just goop em up some more. $5 and 5 minutes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guys,

Thanks for the tips and the confirmation of my leak. I'm going to take the boat to a local marina and see if they can replace the rivets for a reasonable price. The leak is located underneath the floor of the boat and the floor is riveted down too. Given my handiman skills and the fact that I have a tendency to pound my small boat on big water, I'm not all that comfortable drilling out or chisling off rivets without some expert guidance. Hopefully the price will be reasonable and I can get the job done this week.

On a related note, I'm still curious if that durafix product or similar aluminum welding rods could be used to fix the boat while in the middle of a semi remote trip. Any thoughts on that point???

Thanks again for the diagnosis and tips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem with the welding rods is first on a boat the heat disapation you will not be able to use just propane. It wont get hot enough. There is a hotter one that might get hot enough but the problem is in order to get that stuff to melt you need to get to about 5 degrees below the melting temp of aluminum and if you are not careful you will burn a hole in your boat. I have tried many times to make the weld sticks work and have only had sucess on welding aluminum cans. I busted two rivets two years ago and filled the holes with some type of epoxy resin that fleet farm sells. Just kneeded it like playdough and it hardens like a rock on aluminum in 7 minutes. I even fixed a hole in my prop with it and you cant even tell it was reworked. A tube of this stuff was like 10 dollars and worked for both my applications. Stay away from JB Weld. That stuff is junk on aluminum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I can post the experience I had with a style of brazing rod. I tried HTS-2000. It has a melting point far below aluminum, around 735 degrees, and propane works to heat the area needing to be fixed. The problem I ran into with the stuff was not that it didn't stick, or that the product doesn't work, rather the boat its self. Once I applied heat to the aluminum, it warped and bowed out. The aluminum sides are under tention, so when it got hot enough, it wanted to go back to straight.

Now, if I had a second person willing to spend an entire afternoon holding the boat straight while I filled 60 holes, it would have worked great. So, I'm going with epoxy putty, the same stuff Eurolarva decided to use. It's paintable, moldable, sandable, extremely hard and should work fine for filling the holes.

I would like to say that HTS-2000 is pretty sweet. It's easy to use, and really does brazy with propane, far better then the stuff you can buy at the home stores (tried them). It just isn't practical for my situation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't you guys even wonder why they put those rivets in the boat? One clue for you is that they arent for looks. They also dont put in extra ones at the factory. lol. So tell me how much strength do you suppose your putty is going to have? There's a reason those rivets loosened up. Silicone or putty is a temporary fix at best. If you think its permanent, well, youre entitled to fix your boat as you wish, but no marine shop would do it that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought LUND had a lifetime warranty on the hull. I would bring it to a dealer and check that out first. Just my 2 cents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing to check if you thought the boat filled quickly with water is if your livelwell hose has a cut in it - when you're in the lake turn your livewell on and watch in the back of your boat (in the bilge area) if you see a lot of water streaming toward the back of the boat it's likely livewell related. It wouldn't be the first time I've seen it, that's for sure.

marine_man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

Don't you guys even wonder why they put those rivets in the boat? One clue for you is that they arent for looks. They also dont put in extra ones at the factory. lol. So tell me how much strength do you suppose your putty is going to have? There's a reason those rivets loosened up. Silicone or putty is a temporary fix at best. If you think its permanent, well, youre entitled to fix your boat as you wish, but no marine shop would do it that way.


You're right, and I would never use epoxy putty to replace a rivet. What I'm using it for is to fill holes drilled into the side of the boat for various accessories and such. I have something like 40-60 holes to fill from various things. In my case, the epoxy will do just fine. All of them are above the water line, and none of them are load baring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

3) Is it possible to weld the rivets myself with a propane torch and durafix? If so, what kind of consideration do I need to take into account when heating an aluminum boat with a propane torch?


Why would you want to weld a rivet??? confused.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't have an air hammer or the correct bit, not to worry. The rivets are a fairly soft metal. Occasionally, at our shop, we run into a situation where, for whatever reason, we can't use an air chisel on them. These rivets can be set easily by hand with a dolly on one side and a several good blows with a hammer on the other. We've fixed dozens of leaky boats this way over the years and haven't had any come back. Like I said, it's not the ideal way, but it will seal, just the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0



  • Posts

    • AlwaysFishing23
    • Cobber
      Selling a 2004 Lund Fisherman, Fully Loaded
      The boat is in excellent shape- has always been kept in a BoatHouse, never spent a night outside.
      Reason for selling is purchased a new Lund.   2004 Lund 1800 Fisherman, IPS Hull
      2004 Yamaha VZ150TLRC V-Max / 150 HP (Electric Start, Tilt & Trim) (Top Speed 52-54mph)
      2012 Yamaha T9 (9.9HP)- T9.9LPA, 4-Stroke Kicker w/ Tilt & Trim & Electric Start   The Boat Features:
      * Top Speed of Boat Generally- 52-54 MPH
      * Humminbird 959CI HD DI (Down Imaging & GPS Combo)- Internal GPS Antenna Unit
      * Humminbird comes with a Navionics MN Mapping Chip
      * Stainless Steel Prop for Yamaha VMAX 150
      * (Spare) Aluminum Prop for Yamaha VMAX 150
      * Transom Saver Included
      * Trolling Motor (Minn Kota 65PD)- 65lb Thrust & Foot Control
      * Hydraulic Steering for the 150 HP Main Motor
      * Tilt Steering Wheel for Outboard Motors
      * 4 Lund Seats (Great Condition)
      * 2 Jump Seats in AFT
      * Aft Casting Deck (when Jump Seats fold down)
      * Ski Bar
      * Vinyl Floor
      * OEM (LUND) Snap-in Marine Carpet (hardly used)
      * Full Set of Batteries for Boat (2 for 24v Trolling System, Starting Battery)
      * Onboard Charger for Trolling Motor 24v System (Single Plug-in Point to charge both)
      * Two (2) Boat Covers- One is LUND brand, second is Cabelas Brand
      * Rod Storage: 7'6" Port Side (5 Tubes, Lockable)
      * In-Floor Storage in Lower Level (batteries)
      * Dual Livewells (Aft/Bow)- Auto-Timed Aerated, with Lighting
      * Stereo/CD with Speakers- Equipped   Boat Specifications:
      * Boat Hull is the IPS Hull, from Marine-grade 5052 H34 aluminum
      * Boat Length: 18' 6"
      * Boat Beam: 96"
      * Transom: 20" (OB)
      * Fuel Tank: 40Gal Capacity, with ProPlus Reserve
      * Bilge Pump
      * Interior Lighting (switched)
      * Navigation Lights
      * Deep, Full-width Splash Pan (rear)
      * Double-Riveted Seams
      * Solid Metal Seat Hinges   Trailer:
      * Karavan Roller Trailer
      * Galvanized Trailer
      * Extremely low miles on trailer (Boat sat in a Boat House at the Cabin)
      * Trailer features Surge Brakes Equipped
      * Trailer has a spare tire included   Please call, text or email with any questions.
      I'll remove the ad as soon as the boat is sold.   Thanks-
      Cary @ 651-775-2646
    • buzz1ng
      Public water is the Surface of the Water, not the land beneath it.  So even if you can access the river through an easement the actual land that youre standing on could be private property. Everything on the DNR Website says "Surface of Water" in the trespassing section.  I agree this is unfortunate,  but as usual, the 3 drunk morons that don't care ruin it for the 1000 that do..... standard procedure these days.  1 idiot doesn't clean his boat, and wrecks a lake for thousands of people.
    • Cliff Wagenbach
      I just returned from the hatchery and got a few stats on this springs catch. Total eggs taken this spring is 708 quarts which was their quota wanted this year. Normal yearly quota is 850 qts. to 900 qts. Nets were pulled as soon as their quota was met, but the walleyes were still running well and probably spawned below the dam naturally. There are about 100,000 eggs per quart and the average fry hatch rate in the hatchery is 75% to 80%!  Natural hatch rate for eggs is only about 2% to 3% in the lake! Actual survival rate of all fry is highly dependent on water temps during the spring and summer, (the warmer-the better)! Predators also play a huge role in survival rate. Predators of the fry range from zooplankton to any thing else that wants to eat them! There were 5,500 male walleyes trapped and 2,000 female walleyes trapped before the trap nets were pulled. The eggs are hatching much slower this spring because the water temps have dropped from 53 degrees at the start of the trapping to 39 degrees this morning. Fry release into Vermilion is estimated to happen at around the walleye fishing opener this year because of the late hatch and water temps. Largest female trapped this spring was 32 inches! Cliff    
    • Knowknot
      That sounds encouraging. Did you notice all the dead carp on shore? I wonder what's up with that, a virus or something maybe?