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picksbigwagon

climber, ladder or hang on

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picksbigwagon

I am hunting new land this fall, on my own and I want to either invest in a couple hang ons or a climber. My problem is my size, 6' 7" 275+ in the winter with my cold stuff on. The land has one ladder stand on it already, and I plan putting in a couple ground blinds, Did I mention I don't like heights? Yeah, that throws a monkey wrench in it as well. Stable is a key thing

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Mark Christianson

I dont like heights either so quite simply ladder stands are the best option for that.

Hang ons and climbers, I just don't like that feeling of nothing but a chain or strap holding me to that tree.

A ladder stand gives me a much more comfortable and satisfying feeling knowing that the ladder is below me and holding that thing up!

They arent the easiest to be carrying around, so if moving frequently is something you plan to do, a ladderstand isnt the best bet for that.

I have 8 ladder stands now and just set them up in my go to areas and let them be all fall.

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jlm

I agree and I also think that ladder stands are much more safe. The only problem is that you are really limited with how high you can place the stand. Some of my hang-on's are 25 ft up (bow hunting). Most of the time you do not need that height, however, sometimes you will. If I were you, I would go with a ladder and hang-on if possible. Personally, if you have a good area, I would recommend that you have 10 or more stands to choose from depending on conditions. However, if you have only one stand, get something you can move easily. A climber would be ideal in this situation. Sorry, my response sure did not help much. Spend as much as you can on good, comfortable stands. The ability to sit for long periods will increase your odds of scoring dramatically! Good luck!

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jltimm

Ladder stands are nice, and actually not to bad to move, depending on your terrain. I moved mine twice last year during the season, and it was easy. I left it put together, layed it on the ground, stood inside of the bottom two rungs, grabbed the outside of the ladder and started dragging it with the heavier seat part laying on the ground so you don't have much weight.They are a little awkward to get leaned up to the tree by yourself though.

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Gus

I like to have a variety of options because you never know if one stand type will work where you want to hunt. Some trees just won't work with certian types of stands. I hate finding a perfect spot and not being able to make a stand work there. I'm big too... well more tubby than tall but I weigh in the same as you. For hang on stands I love the Gorrila Magnum line. Big platform, big comfy seat, and they sure seem very stable to me and quiet. I have a rivers edge hangon in the large or magunm size and it's ok. The seat is not nearly as comfortable as the Gorrila. I also only use climbing sticks with my hang ons. I hate screwing in those steps and I've had them pull out on me before. For lightweight and portablilty you can't beat the lone wolf climibing sticks. I LOVE mine. But I do have several sets of the cheaper rivers edge or whatever brand ladders and they do work just fine too. They just are not quite as portable. Ladder stands are great. But I don't want to be moving them. Stick one or two up in a place where you don't believe you'll be moving them. They are nice for sitting. I also have a climber. I really feel the most safe in a climber. They just seem to cradel you very well and are stable as well. Summit makes a great line and so does lone wolf. Lone wolfs are $$ but I think worth every penny in quality. You really can't beat a summit though. Whatever you do you may not be able to afford to go all out so just pick up a stand or two to get started while you learn the land and shop bargains to get that army put together. Pretty soon no deer will be safe! grin.gif

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uptracker

Look into the Tree Saddle! Love mine and they're strong enough for you. You only need one and then set up as many trees as you like with steps. It'll never get stolen, sat in, or rust etc!

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picksbigwagon

Did you read the part about my dislike of heights? Yeah, I researched those saddle things, but I would be only about 5 feet off the ground, I would do better standing on the ground than sling my backside to some rope and straps

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Mark Christianson

Couldnt agree more Picks.

Those saddles are out of the question for me too.

shocked.gif

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snapcrackpop

If you are going to only be about 5 feet off the ground any ladder stand should work. They are cheaper and with one or two sections, would be light and easy to move... so buy 2! wink.gif

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delmuts

picks! i've been a ground stand hunter for years!( i don't like heights either!) but have started using ladder stands. i'm always a little shakey at first, but feel comfortable once i get settled in. many stands are rated for 300# so you will be ok.one tip. don't buy the very cheap ones ! with soem , the distance from the platform to the seat is to short.( not comfortable, and you have to kind of lean forward when you want to stand up).i have modified mine! and buy the ones that have a flip up seat. this gets you closer to the tree.( better conceilment, and i feel better when i can lean against something!) you may be uncomfortable at first, but after sitting in one for a while , you will be ok! AND !! ALWAYS use a safety harness! you will feel more secure!del

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HateHumminbird

Gun or bow?

I think you'd be doing yourself a disservice, either way, by not looking into a portable ground blind, especially given the scenarios/circumstances you've outlined.

Your height problem is swiftly solved, and it's much more portable than even a climber, as you're not limited to certain trees/areas.

Some disadvantages are that you'll have to brush-in your blind, depending on cover. Use Double-Bull's 50/100 rule. If the first time a deer sees your blind will be inside of 50 yards, brush it in. If it will see your blind the first time from beyond 100 yards, there's no need.

Also, a Double Bull or other blind is more costly than many premium stand options.

That said, some advantages are:

-Maximum portability

-Cost savings from reduced # of stands

-Enclosed weather-resistant shell

-Concealed movement within blind

Ultimately, I use mine as a tool amongst many other tools (like climbers, ladder stands, etc.), but I find myself using it more and more. Bring a pair of ratcheting brush cutters to help conceal the blind when no other material is available.

Give it some consideration.

Joel

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fishermn

I have the same issue with height, and I am not quite your height and about the same weight, so I understand your dilemma grin.gif I personally use a Summit Goliath climber. Its relatively light, easy to use, very solid, and if you wear a harness (especially while climbing) its extremely safe.

Even in December with full Winter gear on, it is still roomy enough that you dont feel cramped.

However, I hunt in the northern part of the state where there are plenty of moderate sized aspen, maple, and oak that will work well with a climber. If you are hunting in such an area, a climber would likely be a good choice. But if you area is full of really big diameter or small diameter trees, you might be better off with a good quality ladder stand.

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picksbigwagon

Slug gun area, so basically it is the same as bow hunting, and I will probably get two or three ladder stands this summer. there is already one if not two on the property already. A little ground blind construction and I should be set. only 240 acres, maybe 90 are woods....

Joel is that a "smoothie" in your hand? (avatar picture that is)

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Tenpoint

I hated heights, when I started bow hunting, but my desire to get a deer was greater then my fear. I would suggest you buy a good quaity climber, most if not all come with a full body harness. You will be just fine. When I got mine, I didn't climb very high at first. As I got more comfortable, I would climb a little higher, and so on. I still don't climb to nosebleed heights, but I have somewhat gotten over my fear. If it is a new area, I would want a climber, just for the portablity. If you continue to hunt the property, and learn the deer patterns, then place some ladder stands in good locations. Keep the climber for times when the wind won't cooperate.

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huntmup

Joel, I have a number of late season spots where a ground blind would benefit. Do you use your D-B late season bow with snow on the ground?

What I have been doing is white camo, but there's not much to conceal movement.

Dan

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bigbucks

I would agree that the ladder stand is probably your best choice. With your size I don't think it will be much for you to handle moving them around as you need to. I would recommend at least a 15' ladder, make sure it's not too narrow for you. They're pretty easy to move. I rarely disassemble them on the same property as that's noisy. I've found I can grab it approximately in the middle of the ladder, wherever it balances, & carry it put together. It's easy enough to set it down & rest a bit when you get too tired. The ladder stands maybe are quite as flexible as a hangon, but they're much quicker to setup or move & they'll tolerate a little smaller tree.

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HateHumminbird

Dan:

I haven't used the DB late season. However, I would imagine that deer would spook from the blind without some sort of white camo cover. They came out with a product this year that's basically like a gunsock.....for your Double Bull. Fairly simple to use cover-up that I'd recommend with any snow on the ground.

Picks - You bet, that's the Limit Creek ML rod. Works great!

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harvey lee

I would agree with Joel on the ground blind. I have dozens of stands, including climbers, hang-ons and ladder along with built stands on stilts. I purchased a couple Double Bull blinds a few years back for a handicapped hunt I guide for every year in North Dakota. I questioned these ground blinds at first but, just about every year my hunter shoots a deer out of them. I always brush them in fairly well and you need to watch your scent very close.

They are also very helpful with keeping your small movements from the deer and will keep you dry for awhile in the rain. One can sit on a chair inside and be pretty comfortable for hours.

I know this has been discussed many times before but I will state it again, buy a good one as the cheaper are probably not what you are looking for. I have had three different makes and the Double Bull is in my opinion, hands down the cream of the crop.

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