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Weed Shark

True Bear/Fishing Stories

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Weed Shark

I was young and at a fishing outpost camp. The shack had two large patch jobs; one where a black bear ripped in, and new hole for his exit. One morning, a black bear tries to tear into our shack. My dad and his friend each grab two pots, run out the door in tandem, banging the pots and hollering. The bear ran off, but returns. They repeated the process, and the bear never returned.

So, about fifteen years ago, I’m at an outpost with two friends and bears are everywhere. One morning I say, “I’ll show you how you do this...” I grab two pots and run out the door in my white briefs. The very first time I bang the pots together the handle breaks off…

There I stand, all 6 foot 5 inches, lily white in my underwear, broken handle in hand, the bear just looking at me...

Anybody got an amusing bear story to share?

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Muskycrazy

Mid 80's taking a pee early morning on Afognak Island just off Kodiak Island in AK and got charged ( within 10 feet) by a 8' Sow Kodiak Brown Bear . Talk about shrinkage . blush.gif

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Wish-I-Were-Fishn

Crazy female...

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BobT

Here's one.

One of my mother's favorite summer projects was berry picking. Although we kids didn't care for it too much we didn't complain about the syrups, pies, jams, jellies, and such during the winter. Anyway, my dad was always one who preferred to go off on his own and find his own berry patch. He never failed to return with a full bucket.

One day, mom was picking blueberries in an area that included a lot of hazelnut and tag alder. Dad had done his dissappearing act as usual so she was more or less alone. For some reason we kids weren't with her that day.

After a while she heard someone coming through the brush and she figured it was dad returning. She was busy picking berries and yaking at my dad only to get an occasional grunt once in a while from the other side of the brush. She figured it was my dad until she decided to move to a new position and discovered she was sharing her blueberry patch with a black bear. It was so busy stuffing its face it paid her no second thought. She decided it would be best to just leave the rest of the berries for the bear.

I suppose it was lucky for her that she was making enough noise talking and such that the bear was fully aware of her presence and so it wasn't startled by her. This was one time it paid off for my mother to be a chatter box. laugh.gif

Bob

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Weed Shark

Quote:

Mid 80's taking a pee early morning on Afognak Island just off Kodiak Island in AK and got charged ( within 10 feet) by a 8' Sow Kodiak Brown Bear . Talk about shrinkage .
blush.gif


Incredible...the stuff that re-occurring nightmares are made of.

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fishing tech

We would go to the BWCA with our church group some 20 years ago. We had 40 people/ 4 campsites. We would play tricks on each others camps, like tying their conaes toghther and anchoring them out in the lake in the middle of the night. One night we decided to pretend we were a couple of bears and scare one of the groups. Well one of the campers jumps out of his tent with the pot and laddle banging so hard he breaks the laddle. The look on his face when the flash from the camera went off was priceless. The next night the same group but at a differant campsite and lake had a real bear come into their camp. Well the big brave guy with the broken laddle thought it was us again. So he get up and starts throwing stuff in the direction of the noise and soon finds out that it is a real bear. He runs to the lake, jumps in a conae, pushes off and doesn't have any paddles. I think he woke everyone on the lake that night when he had to get in that cold water and swim the conae back.

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ocf1

My church goes to the bwca for a mens retreat each year. They all have names because of experiences, my dads canoe man because he tipped the canoe before he got going and dumped another guy and all the gear out. anyways dangerous animal bill gets chased by a bear that went through the mesh tent and so what does he do? he runs into the porta potty 1/2 a mile away.

one with me. We were staying at sawbill lake 2 summers ago (we got spot #5, woohoo)2nd night we hear banging of pots 2 sites down, im in a tent by myself. next night nothin. Then the next night it circles my tent and im shaking for an hour before i hear pots banging 2-3 sites down. So... the next night i sit in front of the fire sharpening my pocket knives, pots ready, the bear never came for all we know, needless to say the bear was shot 2 weeks later.

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tunrevir

Was up in Canada a few years back and we were fishing and having a great time. We decided to pull up on an island to have a bit of shore lunch and relieve ourselves. The guy and his son with us were pretty green and we tell them ,"You don't want to hike to far into the bush because there are alot of bears in the area." The father snorts,"If there is a bear stupid enough to swim this far out just to watch me take a leak then he deserves my fish." We heat up the oil clean the fish, get the taters just about right next to the kettle of beans and off goes Mr. Smug to take a leak. We are tending the lunch fixins and not thirty feet from the guy a bear comes out of the bush between him and the shorelunch. We hollered, "BEAR BEHIND YOU!!!" He replied, "You guys are so full of --it" but began to turn around midstream just to see the bear heading out of the brush. The look on his face was priceless, pasty white and raw fear took hold and he darted for the water. I think he made the first twenty or so feet running still on top of the water! We dragged him into the boat and watched as the bear ate a mighty fine lunch. His son never let him live that down and neither do we. The real fun now is just getting up occassionally and banging the pots and pans just to flip him out! We always tell him we'll never yell bear unless there is one there, and to date that is the rule for safety reasons. Bang a few pots and pans in the middle of the night and it does make for some good fun. He, by the way, now sleeps with pepper spray. We just have to conjure a good story about how bears are really attracted to the smell of pepper. Keep fishing guys!

Tunrevir~ grin.gif

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Sandmannd

Back when I was 14 and in Boy Scouts we made a trip to the bwca. It was the last night out. Everyone went out from camp to fish except myself and one other dude. We were getting supper going. I had to go to the bathroom and at the time that consisted of a square box about a hundred yards from camp. I walked up the trail and thought I heard the bushes rustling. Figured it was just a squirrel so dropped the pants and started to go. A few seconds go by and I hear a grunt. I look over my left shoulder and there sits a black bear. I went screaming like a ten year old girl down the trail with my shorts around my ankles yelling that there was a bear. Everyone fishing came in and looked for it but found nothing. None of them believed me.

Later that night the bear came to visit and got our food pack. He ate our entire breakfast for the next morning. I was the only one who slept through it. All I could say was "Told ya so" the next morning.

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Harmonica Bear

One of our earlier BWCA trips (mid 80's) we were camped on Fourtown and did the dumb idea of picking fresh blueberries and making blueberry pancakes with fried fish (in camp, duh!). Oh' my it was good though. Unfortunately, a bear thought it smelled pretty good, too. After breakfast I was napping in a hammock when one of guys starts muttering "b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b-bearrrrr, b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b-bear...". Of course, dork-head me, having the nickname Bear, only assume they are trying to wake me up. I slowly lift the hat off my face, turn my head in their direction and scream "WHAT!" ...right into a face of a bear 3 feet away. The bruin and I freaked in unison. The bear ran. I, with steel-like nerves and cat-like athletic prowess, fell out of the hammock! We still laugh about that incident years later.

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The Grebe

On a warm day in late September, a few years back, my son and a friend were hunting grouse up near McGregor.

My son finds this hole behind a windfall and for whatever reason, curiosity of youth or something, he squats down and looks into it, I don't know what he expected to find, but once his eyes adjusted to the darkness, what he did find, was a black bear, about a foot in front of his face, looking back at him.

Although he was armed and dangerous, he said it took him about 4 seconds to cover about a hundred yards, through the grouse woods, back to the truck, leaving some of the forest floor smoldering behind him! grin.gif

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Weed Shark

There is a story in the news. A boy was pulled from his tent in Utah and killed by a black bear. Officials tracked and killed the bear, now proven to be the offender.

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The Grebe

My niece from Wisc. sent me some pictures of bears that come into her yard...they were featured on T.V. a week or so ago, big suckers!

She was telling me how tame they are and that they wouldn't bite anyone...! I told her she is delusional and to stay the he11 away from those things, no matter how tame they seem!

They get a chance and she would be dinner, or dessert, or maybe they would just knock her from pillar to post and kill her a little bit, just because they can!

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Weed Shark

There is a story on page A7 of today's Star-Trib, if you want to point it out to her.

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irvingdog

I was in Canada one year, squatting across a blow-down, "negotiating a hostage release", when a sow and cub came around the trail towards me.

My brother says it's the first time a man with his pants at his ankles jumped off an 8 foot black granite rock face and landed in his boat. He also says he hopes it's the last time.

/True story

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