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mnoutside

Ethanol

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Can anyone tell me if it is OK to use 10% ethanol gas in my 1995 Johnson 115HP 2-stroke engine.

Thanks

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Not a direct answer, but you don't have much choice in a lot of cases - and may not have any choice in the future.

In my neck of the woods, many places have dropped non-oxygenated premium in favor of E-85.

Unless the gas pump is specifically labeled as non-oxygenated (in Minnesota, anyway) you are getting an ethanol blend.

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It will be fine. I've run it in my '96 75 hp Merc for years with no issues.

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IT SHOULD RUN JUST FINE. I LIKE TO PUT A CAN OF SEAFOAM IN WHEN I FILL. IT GIVES IT THAT EXTRA.

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Seafoam, Seafoam, Seafoam! In every tank of gas.

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I DO AND MY PERFORMANCE IS MUCH BETTER. IT REALLY HELPS WHEN PULLING PLUGS OR IF YOU USE YOUR BOAT FOR TUBING AND SKIING.

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I don't mean to hyjack this thread but thought I'd pass along some related information.

Speaking of Seafoam, my 2001 F-150 with the 5.4L has consistenty given me 17.5mpg to 18mpg on the highway for years. A week ago before leaving for my annual trip to Lac Seul in Ontario I decided to add a can of Seafoam as an injector cleaner. I have never used Seafoam before. To my surprise my fuel economy jumped to 19mpg for my trip to Canada. The coincidence is too uncanny to be anything else. With this, I'm sold.

Bob

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I just don't know exactly why the seafoam thing works like that. I get the same effect in my 99 Silverado - typically 15.5 or 16 MPG, I get 17.5 or 18 w/ a can of seafoam in the tank. Blows me away - At $6 a can, I get another 40 miles from the same 20 gallons, and the 3 gallons of gas it normally takes for 40 miles costs more = $9! Since I fill twice/week, it would theoretically save me $6 a week to put seafoam in every tank. I've been thinking of buying it by the case to drive the per-can price down to $5.50. smile.gif

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Whoaru, we still have non-oxy in Buffalo. Holiday brought the E85 to town here, but thankfully, its a different station that has the non-oxy.

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I would stay away from it if you can. If you have a older built in gas tank that is fiberglass do not use any gas with ethanol the ethanol can dissolve the resin that in the gas tank and destroy it. Also if you do not use your boat a lot ethanol will absorb moisture and gum up your engine

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If you have built in tanks it is a good idea to install a fuel/water separator inline with your fuel line. The blended gas has more water in it then the non blended and it can cause issues with your high dollar outboard. I think you can pick up a separator for about $20 at most stores including WalMart.

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I just talked to the service people at Rapid Sport Marine Center, where I bought the boat, and they said never, ever use ethanol blended fuel. He said 92 octane or higher, non-oxy. Something about the high compression of this motor. Guess I'll be looking for stations that sell non-ethanol fuel.

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There should be a small plate on the motor, where the serial number is. I once owned a 1999 Johnson 115 that clearly stated 87 octane. My '94 175 efi is recommended for 87 too.

All of the motors I own are recommended for 87 octane, and that is what I run. Never had a problem with ethanol blend gas.

I have had situations where 92 octane did effect performance in a 87 octane recommended motor....negative performance.

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Funny you should mention that label as I recently discovered it on my '98 Johnson 90hp 2-stroke and it too recommends 87 octane fuel. As far as using ethanol, I doubt there are very many engines built in the last 15 to 20 years that are not compatable with 10% ethanol blended fuel. It would be marketing suicide not to.

After finding the label on my outboard I checked my ATV and it does recommend 91 octane or higher but it also is compatable with ethanol blend up to 10%.

Bob

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